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Thread: Threads and Cold Weather...

  1. #1
    Super Member sak658's Avatar
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    Threads and Cold Weather...

    I want to know if anyone else has this problem...I'm piecing away at the machine and clipping my threads and there is so much electricity in the air...my cut threads won't come off my fingers..to put in the thread catchers or trash...I've seen my hair do strange things when I brush it when the weather is cool..but these threads are driving me crazy...If I lick my fingers before I grab the ends that helps some...but I get tired of licking my fingers...each time...I figure someone out there has this problem...hopefully you have some good answers...would really appreciate solutions...thanks and Happy Quilting..

  2. #2
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    I have this problem, too. Licking my fingers is the solution I use also. I think it's because there isn't enough humidity in the house with the furnace on.
    Sue

  3. #3
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    I put a couple of drops of glycerin on my hands when I am sewing. It gives me some grip and I don't have to keep licking my fingers. I learned that from Betty New in a free motion quilting class I took with her. The glycerin is about $4 at Walmart in the pharmacy area. It will last forever.

  4. #4
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    Fill your crockpot with water, leave the lid OFF, and leave it on high in your sewing room while you are in there. Be sure to turn a kitchen chair upside down in the middle of the floor as a reminder to turn it off or refill it!
    ~Laura

  5. #5
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Keep a dryer sheet nearby. Wipe your hands with it occasionally. This will help with the static electricity. You can also wipe your hair with the dryer sheet to tame those flyaways, also.

  6. #6
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    When I FMQ I wear gloves and the threads stick to them. I wrap a piece of masking tape into a circle, sticky side out and stick it to the right side of the machine. When I have threads on my gloves I just stick them to the tape.

  7. #7
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    you are all so clever!!!
    Nancy in western NY
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    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?


  8. #8
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    sounds like you need some humidity in your house- we have had to have all 3 of our humidifiers going this year- it's been a cold/dry air season.
    also, if you place a cap-full of fabric softener (like downey) in a spray bottle -then fill with water---go about spritzing your carpeting----not only does it smell good-but it greatly cuts down on static electricity.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  9. #9
    Super Member Mary O's Avatar
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    A can of Static Cling spray is always handy to have.(I think they still make it)Add moisture in your house,much heathier.......
    Mary

  10. #10
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Hang few wet towels to dry in the house.
    Got fabric?

  11. #11
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    Buy a free-standing humidifier. Mine has been running almost constantly this winter.

  12. #12
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    Keep a small piece of cotton batting next to your machine & the threads will transfer from your fingers to the batting & stick there. Replace with a new scrap of batting as needed.

  13. #13
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    Your air is dry, there are alot of ways to put moisture into the house, boil a pot of water on the stove, dry some of your clothes in the house rather than the dryer. We run a humidifier, I hang dry damp clothes on a rack (my nice sweaters, cotton tee shirts, flannel wear), I use hand cream, wipe my palms on my sweats and sew.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltyfeelings View Post
    Fill your crockpot with water, leave the lid OFF, and leave it on high in your sewing room while you are in there. Be sure to turn a kitchen chair upside down in the middle of the floor as a reminder to turn it off or refill it!
    Great idea!

  15. #15
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    If I am using any thread with poly in it the static this time of year can be miserable... the thread just wants to jump and stay on everything else but where it supposed to be. It helps if I take the thread I am going to use and lay a damp ( emphasis on damp) washcloth around the thread for a few hours before using.. It helps alot... I use big cones of thread and this time of year I even use some damp batting scraps and wrap before shutting down for the night..next day all is well.

  16. #16
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    ditto....run your needle with thread thru it before hand stitching works as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Keep a dryer sheet nearby. Wipe your hands with it occasionally. This will help with the static electricity. You can also wipe your hair with the dryer sheet to tame those flyaways, also.
    Kate

  17. #17
    Junior Member DixieLee's Avatar
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    You need more humidity in the house. It is not just threads that are reacting to this lack of humidity. I use a vaporizer in my house all day and the difference is amazing. Not a huge expense for a lot less frustration.

  18. #18
    Super Member sak658's Avatar
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    Thanks you guys for all the advice...I will try all of them...LOL never thought about the humidity in my house..great ideas for that...

  19. #19
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Color me uninformed.... when I was in Houston in October, it felt very humid to me. Is that a seasonal thing, or has it dried up quite a bit since then? Are you further inland?

  20. #20
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    Kudos to all of you. Static electricity was driving me crazy! Most of these hints helped.

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