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Thread: Tilting a sewing machine

  1. #1
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    Tilting a sewing machine

    I just did this and boy, what a difference! Hubster cut me a piece of trim to go under the back of my machine and another piece a little thicker to place the back of my extension table and it's great! I would highly recommend it.
    aka Gale

  2. #2
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    I had forgotten about the 'tilt'. I used it with my old sewing cabinet but discontinued when my DH built my new cabinet. It makes it much easier to see.
    Carolyn

  3. #3
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    I've seen this, but I don't understand the benefit.

    oops, never mind 2011wanna answered my question. thanks.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  4. #4
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    A Board member's husband makes a wooden tilt. I bought two of them, use with both my machines. Not only can you see better, I find it's less back strain. I think her name is Debbie Umpress

  5. #5
    Super Member KarenK's Avatar
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    I use rubber door stoppers found at the $ Store.

  6. #6
    Super Member jemma's Avatar
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    i use rubber door stoppers too+i mark on them with a line so i get them even on both ends of the machine---i was not a believer until i tried it help +++with shoulder strain

  7. #7
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    All the years (decades) I've been quilting and I never thought to tilt any of my machines. going to try now.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  8. #8
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    I have a paperback book under the front of mine!
    If you don't work on it you'll never finish it.

  9. #9
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    do you tilt the machine back or foward? Does it "hurt" the machine to run if it is not level?

  10. #10
    Super Member Glenda m's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsister63 View Post
    do you tilt the machine back or foward? Does it "hurt" the machine to run if it is not level?
    Yeah...what she said. LOL
    You can get older, but you never have to grow up! Tomorrow's just a future yesterday!-Greg Fergerson

  11. #11
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
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    You put the door stops or tilt on the back to tilt the bed of the machine towards you. It drops your shoulders and you can see easier. No it doesn't hurt the machine at all.

  12. #12
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    Definitely going to try this. Just finished piecing a top and my upper back hurts. Maybe this will help.
    Quilting in the Desert

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarenK View Post
    I use rubber door stoppers found at the $ Store.
    Me too - until I got an insert for my cabinet to bring the machine bed down level with the cabinet, and now the machine sits differently in the cabinet. I really like the machine tilted, it helps a lot to see what you're doing. I kind of miss it. Maybe I'll try it again even though I have an insert. It could work!

  14. #14
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    This makes so much sense to me. I would never have thought of this on my own. Thank you for the suggestion. I am going to go try it right now. I'm not going to do very big a tilt, just an inch.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  15. #15
    Super Member OKLAHOMA PEACH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigi712 View Post
    I just did this and boy, what a difference! Hubster cut me a piece of trim to go under the back of my machine and another piece a little thicker to place the back of my extension table and it's great! I would highly recommend it.
    How high??

  16. #16
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    Don't know if backward or forward tilt...but DON"T do it to an embroidery machine! It has to be level for the arm to move correctly, and even a towel under one foot (or 2) will throw the calibration off!
    Would like to try it for quilting tho, seems like it would be best to tilt it from the front, so visiblity is better???

  17. #17
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    Try it both ways if you're in doubt. It works for me tilted to the front (board or whatever on back). I'd read about it here at the QB and forgot about it 'til my shoulders started hurting after a short time at the machine. It makes a big difference.
    aka Gale

  18. #18
    Super Member busy fingers's Avatar
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    I am going to give this a try. It would have never occurred to me. Thinking about it makes sense- it would tilt the stitching closer to your eye as you looked at it and you would not have to be lifting your neck higher to peer at the stitches or where you are going if stippling.

  19. #19
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    Sounds like a great idea. Especially when going to a class and sewing with the machine on a folding table and my body on a folding chair.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  20. #20
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    This is the member whose husband makes them. If he is no longer making them, please send me a PM.
    debbieumphress

  21. #21
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    I found it was OK as well but prefer to have a taller chair - works better for me.

  22. #22
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    A friend from our quilt group puts a couple rubber door stops under the back of her machine and it really does make a big difference. I got to get a couple of them for my machine.

  23. #23
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    The tilt tables are great, but the rubber door stops just drop very easily into my sewing box when I go to a class or retreat. The tilt makes a huge difference to me. Try different size of door stops to get the tilt you need.

  24. #24
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarenK View Post
    I use rubber door stoppers found at the $ Store.
    Me too, on the old Frister Rossman I recently bought it was missing one foot so I put 2 on the rear, kept the odd one as a spare and sit it on a PC Mouse mat, it really helps to see the stitching.

  25. #25
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    Me too I use rubber door stops, they work great!
    llweezie

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