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Thread: tilting your sewing machine

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cagey's Avatar
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    Talked to a woman at the quilt expo and she was telling me that tilting the sewing machine toward you helps with back and eye strain. How many of you do this and what do you use? Is this harder on the machine?

  2. #2
    Super Member luv-e's Avatar
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    I have used the rubber door stoppers you buy @ the $ Store...
    I know it helps me to see better......

  3. #3
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    I have an old, non computerized machine that I do this with. I like it tilted for FMQ work because it's more comfortable. But I have not tried it with a computerized machine.

  4. #4
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    I use a book about an inch thick or so. Don't know how I was able to sew before doing this

  5. #5
    Super Member TFquilter's Avatar
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    Interesting...so by tilting your machine, it makes that much of a difference? I have a computerized machine...I wonder if it would do damage after awhile...does anyone know?

  6. #6
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I did it long ago. My machines are all computerized. It doesn't hurt them in the least. Nancy's Notions actually sells a tilt board that is adustable and has cut outs for your knee lift bar, cords etc. The only thing that bothers me sometimes is seeing in the bobbin case when I am changing bobbins or cleaning etc. I have my whole sewing table set up at just the right height where my arms are level with my sewing machine surface when they are bent at the elbow. It does help with fatigue and neck strain. You can accomplish the same thing with door stops under the back of the machine. The tilt table is just more stable and I love gadgets. I don't remember what I paid for it but it has been well worth whatever it was.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I read this before but, have forgotten to try it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member fabrichore's Avatar
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    I am going to try this.....thanks

  9. #9
    Senior Member Cagey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luv-e
    I have used the rubber door stoppers you buy @ the $ Store...
    I know it helps me to see better......
    That's a great idea. I would think using the rubber door stoppers also keeps the machine from sliding. thanks!

  10. #10
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    I tried this..but I am too vertically challenged..could never see my needle area...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cagey
    Talked to a woman at the quilt expo and she was telling me that tilting the sewing machine toward you helps with back and eye strain. How many of you do this and what do you use? Is this harder on the machine?
    Wow. Never thought of doing that and after years of ER Nursing believe me my back can use all the help it can get. I will try that today!!!! Thanks

  12. #12
    Senior Member traumaRN's Avatar
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    I bought a tilt board at the Houston international quilt festival many years ago and used it for years. It does help with back and neck strain and if your table is not the best height for your machine.

  13. #13
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I tried this..but I am too vertically challenged..could never see my needle area...
    Seems if you are short, tipping the machine would be ideal. No???????

  14. #14
    Senior Member ChrisB's Avatar
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    Sounds like a great idea.

  15. #15
    MTS
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    Wasn't someone making them and selling them here?

    Here it is:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-54134-1.htm
    It's closed but I saw more recent posts listing the lifters for sale.
    You could PM to see if they're still making them.

  16. #16
    Super Member QuiltQtrs's Avatar
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    Most economical would be using the rubber "door stoppers": simply
    prop two of them at the rear of your sewing machine.

  17. #17
    Super Member fabric whisperer's Avatar
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    I haven't tried the lifters, but I may just have to try it, as these old bones get more and more sore nowadays...

  18. #18
    Senior Member Sunflower Girl's Avatar
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    Will have to try this.

  19. #19
    Senior Member pinecone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I tried this..but I am too vertically challenged..could never see my needle area...
    Seems if you are short, tipping the machine would be ideal. No???????
    That went rattling through my noggin too. I put the door stoppers in the back so the machine tilts toward me. It doesn't lift it very much. I like to vary the angle, easier on the neck too.

    piney

  20. #20
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Why would tilting a computerized machine damage it?

  21. #21
    Super Member Becky Crafts's Avatar
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    My husband made me a tilt tray for my computerized machine and I love it! It's set at 45 degree angle & it's great! I use it all the time because I sew in my recliner on a TV tray & I have a real bad back, but haven't had any issues with this.

  22. #22
    Junior Member Old hen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I tried this..but I am too vertically challenged..could never see my needle area...
    Seems if you are short, tipping the machine would be ideal. No???????
    If you're tipping the machine towards you, the area in question would be more visible. If you're tipping the machine in the other direction, you have more than one problem! LOL:)

  23. #23
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by traumaRN
    I bought a tilt board at the Houston international quilt festival many years ago and used it for years. It does help with back and neck strain and if your table is not the best height for your machine.
    your avatar.....that is a twin to my 301A in its very own cardtable.....love that slant needle...no need to tip, but i do have bed lifts under each table leg

  24. #24
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    It makes a world of difference to me to have my machine tilted. We have small blocks, one inch thick, under the back legs of the table. Besides that, I have a foam wrist support under the back of my machine. This is a long foam piece about an inch thick meant to rest your wrists on when working at a computer.

    All this helps me because I am short and it is easier to see this way and less strain on my upper back, neck, etc.

  25. #25
    Senior Member pippi65's Avatar
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    That sounds like a great idea...I will definitely try that one. Thanks.

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