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Thread: Want to use two tops to make a quilt. How do you do this?

  1. #1
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    Want to use two tops to make a quilt. How do you do this?

    I'm making several quilts and want to use pieced tops for both the front and the back of the quilts. Those of you that have done this...any advice on getting both front and back to line up. Any help would be appreciated. Also, what type of design did you use for the quilting? Looking forward to any and all suggestions. Thank you, my unseen quilting friends!
    SEW MUCH FUN!

  2. #2
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    how do you plan to quilt them? If on your machine, then you can pin or spray baste very carefully to line them up--if spray basting I'd suggest you first pin to get them lined up. If you are long arming, it 's going to be trickier cause of the rolling on the take-up roller. You will need to work with your LA quilter on this, but will likely need to add extra fabric on all 4 sides for LA quilter to clamp on and frankly, it may be about impossible to get it exactly lined up going top to bottom (or side to side if loaded that way).

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    Thanks for your reply quiltingshortimer. I will be quilting them on my domestic machine.
    SEW MUCH FUN!

  4. #4
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    My advice would be to match them up size wise and not worry about the patterns lining up. I would do a generic all over pattern like a large meander so it looks good on both sides.

  5. #5
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    My advice would be to match them up size wise and not worry about the patterns lining up. I would do a generic all over pattern like a large meander so it looks good on both sides.
    That's what I'd do, too.

  6. #6
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    I use Sharon Schamber's board method with pins. I didn't worry about anything except that all the edges were lined up. To quilt it, I did most of it in a meander, but there was a panel that needed outlining on the front. I just went ahead and did it. The outlined flowers just look like a design feature on the back. There was a post about this recently. My quilt is in there. https://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f...s-t294919.html

  7. #7
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Here's a video on making reversible quilts.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K1GbQFbhug

  8. #8
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    Thank you all so much. I am soaking up the information. This will all be put to good use!
    SEW MUCH FUN!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    My advice would be to match them up size wise and not worry about the patterns lining up. I would do a generic all over pattern like a large meander so it looks good on both sides.
    That would be my advice, too. I'm afraid trying to line them up would be the way to madness,lol.

  10. #10
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KwiltyKahy View Post
    That would be my advice, too. I'm afraid trying to line them up would be the way to madness,lol.
    It's easy with the boards because you only see the section you are working with.

  11. #11
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
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    From my limited experience in doing this, I think the board method would work well. You really don’t want the blocks to line up exactly on the front and back, unless you do QAYG. The bulk from the seams can become an issue. If you pick which quilt will be sandwiched as the backing ahead of time, you can add an extra wide border to give you a little fudge room, just in case one or the other quilt isn’t perfectly square. An all over quilting pattern works well. I learned a lot in this process, and the next time I will plan ahead.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

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  12. #12
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    The last few quilts I have been reversible, and I love them so much, the next few will be too!

    The way I do it is that I first lay out the batting with just one of the floppies on top. I usually use spray glue to baste it down. Then, I use a long doll needle and dark thread and do a really long running stitch about every 12" or so, horizontally and vertically, and around the edge to create a grid to use as a guide on the reverse side.

    Once I have the grid stitched down, I flip it over and use the stitches as a guide to lay out the reverse quilt top. I'm able to line everything up all the way around pretty accurately.

    As for the actual quilting, I am barely learning to FMQ, and the only stitch I can do somewhat adequately is all all-over loopy meander. So far, I haven't had any trouble with bulky seams, although I have to admit I skirt around the intersections of blocks where that might be a problem.

    I hope that made sense, lol. Good luck with your reversible quilt!

  13. #13
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    JJBlaine - This is a wonderful suggestion! Thanks.
    SEW MUCH FUN!

  14. #14
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    I agree with Tartan; forget about lining them up on both sides. Just line them up and start quilting.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJBlaine View Post
    The last few quilts I have been reversible, and I love them so much, the next few will be too!

    The way I do it is that I first lay out the batting with just one of the floppies on top. I usually use spray glue to baste it down. Then, I use a long doll needle and dark thread and do a really long running stitch about every 12" or so, horizontally and vertically, and around the edge to create a grid to use as a guide on the reverse side.

    Once I have the grid stitched down, I flip it over and use the stitches as a guide to lay out the reverse quilt top. I'm able to line everything up all the way around pretty accurately.

    As for the actual quilting, I am barely learning to FMQ, and the only stitch I can do somewhat adequately is all all-over loopy meander. So far, I haven't had any trouble with bulky seams, although I have to admit I skirt around the intersections of blocks where that might be a problem.

    I hope that made sense, lol. Good luck with your reversible quilt!
    Excellent!!!!

  16. #16
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
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    I tried doing this and my mistake, I realized was not really thinking it through (isn't that always the problem?) you have to be sure that the quilting will work for both sides and since I was using 2 panels, one per side, I got myself into a no win situation...I finally decided to take it apart and make two quilts...good decision...
    Now, for ideas here I love the one from JJ Blaine and will follow that method going forward.

  17. #17
    Junior Member eyes's Avatar
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    I am making a double sided t shirt quilt for someone and my plan is to sew one top to the batiste which is the batting as it's a summer quilt using the stitch in the ditch. For the other side I am sewing it with wide straight lines on the diagonal. Hope it works. Yes, I am using 880F interfacing.
    Linda Lee

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  18. #18
    Super Member MarionsQuilts's Avatar
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    If you want different quilting on both the back and the front ... you can put flannel on the back of each and quilt the top and then quilt the back ... then put the two together, and do some "block" quilting to quilt all four together. It would depend on how heavy you want the quilt to be as well. If you want it heavier, you could put batting on the back of one, and flannel on the back of the other.

  19. #19
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    Another good idea. When i start the quilting process I'll give this some consideration. Thanks Marion!
    SEW MUCH FUN!

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