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Thread: What is Bottom Line thread for and what is it made from? Do you like it?

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Tails View Post
    I really hate to sound dumb, but when you say bottom line thread, are you referring to the prewound bobbins?
    Bottom Line is a 60 wt poly thread from Superior Threads. It comes in spools, cones and pre-wound bobbins.

  2. #27
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    I use it in my bobbin for FMQ. I just blends into the background fabric so beautifully.

  3. #28
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GemState View Post
    I use it in my bobbin for FMQ. I just blends into the background fabric so beautifully.
    Sorry, I meant to say BACKING FABRIC.

  4. #29
    Junior Member An Arm Long's Avatar
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    I use it with King Tut on the top for quilting on my longarm.
    Beth in Maryland

  5. #30
    Super Member carslo's Avatar
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    I just pushed my like button for this comment. I, too, have been sewing since the 70s and mixing top and bottom threads with no problems with wear and tear - only problem I ever had was using 100 % cotton thread on top and bottom and the quilt is giving way in places after 8 years of use.

    Quote Originally Posted by gollytwo View Post
    It is old, outdated quilting lore that top and bottom threads must be the same.
    I've been quilting for 30+ years, often using different threads, quilts have been well used and washed alot - no problems.
    We really need to put to rest a lot of the old rules.
    A bed without a quilt is like the night sky without stars.

    http://californiaquilting.blogspot.com/

  6. #31
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    Love it !! I use it in the bobbin for everything . I just bought a larger cone. Didn't know about it melting I haven't had any problems with it at all.

  7. #32
    Senior Member Gabrielle's Mimi's Avatar
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    Bob Purcell of Superior Threads spoke at our LQS several times in the last 4 years. He is the one who convinced me to try Bottom Line and So Fine not only in the bobbin but as a TOP thread for piecing. I have used those two threads almost exclusively for the past 4 years. I teach the Learn to Quilt series at my LQS and get the newbies started on them because it helps them to sew that scant 1/4" seam allowance. No bulky thread! As far as the idea that it melts with an iron or cuts through other thread has not been my experience. I also love how long my bobbins last before running out of thread. Give it a try!
    Create with joy in your heart!

  8. #33
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    Superior Info

    Quote Originally Posted by snipforfun View Post
    Bottom Line can be sensitive to ironing and therefore could melt. Not recommended for piecing per Superiors website
    Bottom Line is a 60 wt. lint-free filament polyester. Bottom Line is a very versatile thread which can be used in many applications.
    •Available in 55 colors.
    •Ideal for hand and machine appliqué, detail quilting, embroidery, stitch-in-the-ditch, bobbin thread, trapunto, binding, free standing lace, heirloom sewing, serger thread, and garment construction.
    •Several colors blend into fabrics so well that they appear invisible.
    •Wonderful thread choice for micro stippling.
    •Available in cones and spools.
    •SuperBOBs are The Bottom Line thread wound on cardboard-sided bobbins available in L-style (118 yds.) and M-style (215 yds.) prewound bobbins.
    •BOB's are The Bottom Line thread wound onto plastic-sided bobbins and are ideal for hand appliqué.
    •SuperBOBs Donut is a collection of 35 SuperBOBs set into a BobbinSaver

  9. #34
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    I think so also.I think people like to make up stuff so it sounds like they are in the know.If it works,do it.I'm not always popular at the guild meetings.So many quilt police.I don't always share info either.I usually use "So-Fine"in my bobbin.Just my personal favorite.I use this for piecing also.The finer weight gives me more accuracy.It's complete nonsense that one thread "cuts"the other over time.Who decided that?If they were looking at an old quilt pieced with cotton thread,then maybe the cotton just deteroited.Well maybe.But no one knows.They are just guessing and presenting their thoughts as fact.

  10. #35
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by damaquilts View Post
    Love it !! I use it in the bobbin for everything . I just bought a larger cone. Didn't know about it melting I haven't had any problems with it at all.
    That's interesting. I've had poly melt before and it can ruin the quilt.

  11. #36
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    Where did you find that on the Website? I looked and couldn't find it. froggyintexas

    Quote Originally Posted by snipforfun View Post
    Bottom Line can be sensitive to ironing and therefore could melt. Not recommended for piecing per Superiors website

  12. #37
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    Just another yes vote! I personally love how long my bobbin lasts with this thread.
    Carol

  13. #38
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    Where did you find that on the Website? I looked and couldn't find it. froggyintexas


    Originally Posted by snipforfun
    Bottom Line can be sensitive to ironing and therefore could melt. Not recommended for piecing per Superiors website.




    https://www.superiorthreads.com/foru...c/bottom-line/

    Bob from Superior Threads also gives this caution on his Thread Therapy DVD. I'm not sure they are correct about how hot an iron gets, though. My Rowenta on its hottest setting could not make a dent in 60wt polyester bobbin thread when I tested it for melting. I'm waiting on the spool of Bottom Line that I ordered to test it with my iron. I'm just not sure who irons enough for the thread to attain 510 degrees Fahrenheit.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by damaquilts View Post
    Love it !! I use it in the bobbin for everything . I just bought a larger cone. Didn't know about it melting I haven't had any problems with it at all.
    Ditto. It's all I use in the bobbin. Because it's so fine, a bobbin lasts so much longer than other threads. I've used it with King Tut, with all kinds of metallics, and lots of variagated threads for FMQ, and I also use it for piecing. THe finer your thread is for piecing, the less bulk it adds to the seams.
    Cathy

  15. #40
    Junior Member Old hen's Avatar
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    I'm with you, gollytwo! It not only works perfectly well with other threads, it makes a flatter seam when pressed to one side because of it's lighter weight. I have washed it, ironed over it, and tested it's strength. Winners in all categories. I have also quilted for many years, and by process of elimination have changed my ideas many times. When something new comes out, try it, then make up your own mind about using it, whether it's thread, fabric, machines, etc! Bottom Line does work better in some of my machines, but not so well in my older ones. I love not having to wind a bobbin so often.
    Husker Barb

  16. #41
    Super Member Fraew's Avatar
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    I use it for English Paper piecing and hand applique. Love it!
    Fraew

    "I don't buy vintage quilts. By the time I finish the quilts I've started they've already become antiques." ~ Mark Lipinski
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  17. #42
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    As a relative new quilter, I have followed this discussion with interest. My question is how do I wind a bobbin from a cone? I have just picked up sewing after a 30 year absence and am only familiar with winding bobbins from small spools of thread. Thanks very much.

  18. #43
    Super Member LyndaOH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FabricHeaven View Post
    As a relative new quilter, I have followed this discussion with interest. My question is how do I wind a bobbin from a cone? I have just picked up sewing after a 30 year absence and am only familiar with winding bobbins from small spools of thread. Thanks very much.
    It depends on the sewing machine, but on mine you do it exactly the same way. Place the cone on the spool holder and thread it the same way you would if you were winding from a spool. If your machine can't use a cone, you can set the cone behind the machine (usually on a cone holder), thread it through the top of the cone holder and if your machine has one, through the little loop on your machine and then through the usual patch for winding a bobbin.

    If your machine doesn't have a little loop built in, you can tape a safety pin to the machine and use the little loop in the pin as your first spot in the path.

    I know I haven't explained this very well; maybe someone else will come along with a diagram. Actually, here's a much better explanation: http://www.ehow.com/how_7689581_use-...g-machine.html

  19. #44
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I use a thread holder (my favorite is this one: https://www.superiorthreads.com/shop...thread-holder/ Nancy Notions has it on sale sometimes) to wind bobbins from big cones. It can be used horizontal or vertical.
    Got fabric?

  20. #45
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    Thank you both so much. You have been very helpful.

  21. #46
    Senior Member luvstoquilt301's Avatar
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    I USED to use it for piecing. I like to put a hot iron on my blocks. When a top went onto a long arm quilting machine, the seams were popping open. I am using up what I have left for machine stitching the binding on.

  22. #47
    Senior Member ghquilter53's Avatar
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    Bottom line in polyester and works very well in my bobbin for machine quilting. My machine doesn't like it for the top thread. I also use this thread for hand applique. I purchased a couple of the selections of prewound bobbins and put them in a round bobbin holder for easy carrying.

  23. #48
    Senior Member stchenfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by An Arm Long View Post
    I use bottom line in my bobbins alot. It is 60wt - very fine and strong. ( I think nylon or blend - my label does not say) Because it is so fine, I don't have to change the bobbin so often. At first I was afraid the stitches would not show because it is so thin, but I find that is not the case.
    So good to know - always learn something new! Thank you all!
    Love 4 stchen

  24. #49
    Senior Member maryfrang's Avatar
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    My APQS long arm just loves Bottom Line for the bobbin. I use in all the time.

  25. #50
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
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    I have used bottom line quite a lot for quilting and piecing. It does hold a great deal more per bobbin than a spool wound with a 'regular' thread. Many years ago I made some heirloom machine clothes. The very fine bobbin thread (which is the same/similar ) as bottom line. I think you either love it or hate it. I ran out of the color of bottom line while quilting and went and bought a similar product. Not the same--as far as tension. Yes when you use bottom line in quilting you have to monkey around with the tension. But that is nothing new, we all have had threads that needs adjustment.
    When I used the bottom line in the quilt, once I got the right tension-maybe 2 adjustments, it continued to sew perfectly. When I used (aurafil I think) I had many adjustments, and was blessing out the thread. If you like what you use, then use it. I think bottom line is a poly or a nylon, which is very strong.
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

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