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Thread: What do you use for stabilizer for applique?

  1. #1
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    Experience tells me using a stabilizer makes a world of difference for applique, whats the best and most reasonable?

  2. #2
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Depends on what i am applique-ing.

    Sometimes freezer paper and sometimes wash-away stabilizer. I have even used another piece of the fabric.

    If I use freezer paper, after I have done my sewing I spritz the paper with water and let it sit then tear it out. Mind, I have used a shorter stitch length when doing it this way.

    ali

  3. #3
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    When I machine applique, I use stitch-n-tear on the backside and most of the time do a blanket stitch on the applique. It makes such a difference in the quality of stitches using a stabilizer. When it's all done, I tear away the stabilizer. I'm thinking of trying a wash away stabilizer sometime. Hopefully someone will have experience with that and share their thoughts.

  4. #4
    Senior Member PiecesinMn's Avatar
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    I use a stitch and tear product. Makes a big difference in the smoothness of the appliquing. I haven't tried the wash away ones but might be worth a try. Good Luck.

  5. #5
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    It depends. I have used coffee filters and just wet it a bit to remove, I have use a tear away stabilizer, and if it is a small enough project and I can leave it in place, I will use Ricky Tims Stable Stuff. If is an amazing stabilizer and if you leave it in place, when it gets wet if becomes very soft and flexible without adding extra puff to the quilt.

  6. #6
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    I'm following this thread with great interest. I have sooooooo much to learn.

  7. #7
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I use stitch and tear! I won't applique without it, it does make a huge difference. I have used wash away , but for the price , I stay with stitch and tear. The wash away is too pricey for the amount I use.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sushi
    I'm following this thread with great interest. I have sooooooo much to learn.
    Me, too! I know it makes the applique look way better using it.

  9. #9
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    I've used fuseable interfacing. Sew it to what needs to be appliqued. Cut around the excess. Put slit in the interfacing so you can turn it. Poke out all corners and run a knitting needle around the curves. Fuse into place (no pinning, and no need to remove the interfacing.)

  10. #10
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I just use notebook paper. It works fine and tears away.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonnieLoree
    I've used fuseable interfacing. Sew it to what needs to be appliqued. Cut around the excess. Put slit in the interfacing so you can turn it. Poke out all corners and run a knitting needle around the curves. Fuse into place (no pinning, and no need to remove the interfacing.)
    This is what I'm trying now to avoid the two steps of basting the fabric edges under the freezer paper and basting or gluing the piece to the background. Exactly what interfacing works well for this?

  12. #12
    Super Member TonnieLoree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maia B
    Quote Originally Posted by TonnieLoree
    I've used fuseable interfacing. Sew it to what needs to be appliqued. Cut around the excess. Put slit in the interfacing so you can turn it. Poke out all corners and run a knitting needle around the curves. Fuse into place (no pinning, and no need to remove the interfacing.)
    This is what I'm trying now to avoid the two steps of basting the fabric edges under the freezer paper and basting or gluing the piece to the background. Exactly what interfacing works well for this?
    Iron on stuff. Determine just how stiff you want your applique to be. Some might have too many curves to make this even possible. Simple curves or circles can handle a very stiff interfacing. Leaves and smaller items would take the kind you put into knits. I guess it would be your call since I don't know what kind of fabric you are using or what your design is. Very small branches or long and thin items might require a needle-turn application with no interfacing at all . Good luck, and keep me posted! I almost forgot to mention that you still need to clip or trim your curves. :lol:

  13. #13
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I starch the background fabric super stiff and then use the Eleanor Burns method of turning the edges under with fusible interfacing. Of course, I only do machine work so it probably wouldn't work for anyone who wants to do it by hand.

  14. #14
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I use tear away...lite...I get at Joann's by the yd

  15. #15
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TonnieLoree
    I've used fuseable interfacing. Sew it to what needs to be appliqued. Cut around the excess. Put slit in the interfacing so you can turn it. Poke out all corners and run a knitting needle around the curves. Fuse into place (no pinning, and no need to remove the interfacing.)
    this is an interesting idea. i'll have to give it a try.

  16. #16
    Super Member LindaR's Avatar
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    depending how dense, sometimes I just starch heavily...

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