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Thread: What kind of quilter are you?

  1. #26
    Senior Member freezeframe03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janRN
    When I want a design or something other than straight lines, I draw or trace a stencil and then just stitch on the lines. I don't drop the feed dogs (that terrifies me!!) and I can do circles, leaves, etc.I don't know if what I do qualifies as a technique or what but it works for me!
    Oh, janRN, me too, me too, that's how I do simple designs as well.

  2. #27
    Super Member quilttiludrop's Avatar
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    I've done a little FMQ, however my main suite is Pantographs currently. The stippling I have done was around frames or appliqued objects. That was fairly easy! I've decided to work on mastering a variety of techniques! I'm very comfortable and adapted to outlining and using a ruler also! I'll try (almost) anything at least once!

  3. #28

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    I have tried machine quilting in the ditch on my Janome but I always seem to get it puckery and I can't figure out why. I tried making the stitch longer but it was too loose. I ended p ripping it all out and doing my hand quilting thing on a standing hoop frame. What am I doing wrong????

  4. #29
    Member egagnon291's Avatar
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    I'm like you. Have just started machine quilting and the free motion makes me so tense it's not enjoyable. But people keep saying practice, practice, practice. So, I do most of my design quilting by hand. Like you, I refuse to send out a quilt for someone else to do because I like to know that the quilt was made entirely by me. And I really prefer hand quilting. It takes longer, but it is somehow much more satisfying when it's done. But, I do understand the advantages of the machine. More quilts get finished that way.

  5. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by egagnon291
    I'm like you. Have just started machine quilting and the free motion makes me so tense it's not enjoyable. But people keep saying practice, practice, practice. So, I do most of my design quilting by hand. Like you, I refuse to send out a quilt for someone else to do because I like to know that the quilt was made entirely by me. And I really prefer hand quilting. It takes longer, but it is somehow much more satisfying when it's done. But, I do understand the advantages of the machine. More quilts get finished that way.
    How true! I just like the way hand quilting shows up on a quilt but I do want to get the work done faster but machine quilting is becoming more frustrating than ever. I am OK on small pieces, but anything bigger than a lap quilt is a challenge. I have tried everything bt the stitches still pucker on me.

  6. #31
    Super Member quiltmaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRenea
    I'm a little-bit-of-everything quilter! I really like to do FMQ, but sometimes a quilt calls for SID or straight-line designs like grids. I don't think any one method is better than the other, it just depends on the project and the look you are going for.

    I am also a bit of everything quilter....depends on the quilt....what it's for...what design would look best...and sometimes just what I'm in the mood to do. Love the challenge and possibilities on each and every quilt.

  7. #32
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I do both machine and hand quilting. The quilt will tell me what it needs to complete the look I want for it.

  8. #33
    Senior Member diannemc's Avatar
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    I hand quilt and love it..only thing it takes to long..wish I could afford to pay someone to do the larger quilts..or wish I could buy a quilting machine...!

  9. #34
    Senior Member freezeframe03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Late Bloomer
    I have tried machine quilting in the ditch on my Janome but I always seem to get it puckery and I can't figure out why. I tried making the stitch longer but it was too loose. I ended p ripping it all out and doing my hand quilting thing on a standing hoop frame. What am I doing wrong????
    Do you have your feed dogs up and are you using a walking foot? Just guessing.

  10. #35
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    I've done stitch in the ditch, use my walking foot a lot and also fmq. As fas as fmq goes, you just need to practice a lot, first by drawing the design on paper or a dry mark board (less paper waste). Then when you are comfortable with the design, try stitching it on your machine. Puddle the quilt top around the needle, spread out your fingers around the needle and try to keep an even speed and fabric movement. Wearing gloves with sticky dots or a coating on the fingers is very helpful, since your fingers won't slide on the fabric or you might try placing a 4" X 6" piece of sticky shelf liner under each hand. Watching someone else do fmq might help. Go to : http://www.daystyledesigns.com Also start on fairly small projects like table runners, placemats or just scrap sandwiches.

  11. #36
    Super Member Joeysnana's Avatar
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    I have always been a hand quilter, but am now learning to machine quilt. I do SID and straight line quilting using painters tape. When I get brave, I will attempt FMQ. I just love all aspects of the quilting process! My machine attemps sure look like a newbie's efforts, but my family thinks they are awesome!

  12. #37
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxxigrani
    I also am a SID person. I have tried FM, it looks like a 4 yr olds attempt at writing, PATHETIC let me tell you, so if I am doing it by machine, its SID or by hand, no machine for me lol..
    This tickled me, LOL! I Zc tually found that if I *did* write names, messages in the quilting, it went much more smoothly for me. Guess my eye/hand was used to the motion and I could maintain the rhythm. I FM letters about 1" - 1.5" high when I do it.

    But I prefer handquilting and use a "big stitch" technique that resembles Japanese Sashiko. The thread is slightly thicker, the needle a bit larger (which helps me to hang onto the needle) and I use thread colors other than just white/ecru to add another dimension to the design of the quilt. These stitches are NOT toe-catchers; they are about 1/8" long. The look is quite attractive and I've had commission requests for the work and been in shows, so somebody must be loving it!

    Jan in VA

  13. #38
    joan_quilts's Avatar
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    I would rather hand stitch my top than try to use the machine. I get so nervous and I don't have the control I do with hand quilting.

  14. #39
    Senior Member Sewflower's Avatar
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    SID, HQ, no FMQ yet but looking 4 adventure

  15. #40
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    I hand quilt straight line - love the look of hand-stitching vs machine. Straight line doesn't require marking the fabric (so you don't have to worry about stencils or removing pencil/chalk,etc. marks. If the line is especially long, I use masking tape as a guide.

  16. #41
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    I took a class in FMQ with Frieda Anderson whose best piece of advice was to sit on a pillow or two to ease your back and to be able to see what you are doing. It really works.

    Quilting in sections works best for me if I want to FMQ. I have tried pre-printed backing for crib-sized quilts, and I also like the quilting on a roll for borders. Practice helps, as does a big glass of wine before starting!

  17. #42
    Junior Member Ann S.'s Avatar
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    I saw a Fons and Porter program this morning on Long Arm Quilting. They suggested using a dry erasable board to practice drawing free motion designs (loops, hearts, and size of stippling). They suggested that the repetition on the erasable board makes for confidence building. Since I don't have a free arm and have to move the fabric quilt instead, wonder if I can someway mount an erasable marker and move the board to practice like I would move the fabric.

  18. #43
    michlowe's Avatar
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    You might try putting door stops under the back of your machine if you do not have a built in. The tilted position of the machine takes the stress out of your shoulders.
    I am currently setting up my quilting room in the back side of my garage. 11oo square feet of house, 3 boys, and one DH, sent me to the garage. I hope to make a quilting area that is large enough to support the entire quilt while I am quilting.
    You might want to read through this web site. http://www.daystyledesigns.com/confirm.htm
    There are great tips for quilting. I have spent hours on this site, but of course not quite as much time as I spend right here!
    Happy Quilting!

  19. #44
    community benefactor Parrothead's Avatar
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    Hand, straight line mostly. I have one quilt where I will need to do a pattern on a large block but my DD and I are talking about embroidery on those blocks.

  20. #45
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    I do some free-motion, but the majority of what I do is SID to stabilize, and then echo quilting. I really like the way echo quilting looks, and I've found you can do gentle curves with a walking foot, no problem.

  21. #46
    ganny's Avatar
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    I have hand quilted for years. Never really cared for the look of machine quilting, but thought I would learn anyway. I tried it on my machine and it was such an ordeal that it made me really appreciate my hand quilting. I don't quilt for any reason except to quilt, therefore, time is of no essence. I enjoy the relaxation of hand quilting and will continue this method. I turn on either my Christian music or Bible CD's and just quilt away. Hand quilting also allows me to sit in the living room with my husband when he is home. My quilts always look nice and have the old-time quilting look.

  22. #47
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    You did not say how you were setting up to do the free motion. I struggled for years until I figured this out. First I lower the presser foot pressure to zero. I have invested in a free motion slider, [cost is about $15) which is a Teflon sheet that goes down on the sewing bed, it makes the quilt slide over the sewing bed so reduces drag. I got some latex palm gardening gloves from the box store. It helps me keep a grip on the fabric. I make sure my sandwich is well basted, I use safety pins. But most of all, practice, practice, practice. I started on small things, bags, pot holders etc. I also do the stitch in the ditch and if you use a gently curved pattern like a cable you can do it with a straight stitch. Also no matter what free motion or stitch in the ditch start in the middle and work to the edge, reverse the quilt and again start in the middle and go to the other edge. That way you never have more than half the quilt under the harp. Also if you have a machine that sits on a table and you have a quilt dropping off the sides of the machine bed the drag will make things harder. If you don't have a set up to make a flat surface then work on some way you can. You would not think that would make a difference but it really does....gravity is a b***h

  23. #48
    Super Member Surfergirl's Avatar
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    I use a walking foot when I SID and never have a problem with "puckering".

  24. #49
    Senior Member kat13's Avatar
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    Here is a site that really helped me with FMQ and so much fun to watch the videos and practice, practice, practice! Good luck.
    http://www.daystyledesigns.com

  25. #50
    Super Member klgreene's Avatar
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    If I didn't' know better, I'd say that you wrote exactly "ME". I always thought I needed the squiggly lines. But I'm finding, that I can straight stitch and have it look really nice. I find myself looking at everything everywhere to see what I can come up with. I did a lot of stich-in-the-ditch, but that just doesn't make it on some quilts. So I've challenged myself to find more shapes I can quilt that are just straight lines.

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