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Thread: What kind of quilter are you?

  1. #76
    Super Member mhansen6's Avatar
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    I only do quilt as you go. I don't have the room or the nerves to quilt my own. I love to piece. I ususally take my quilt tops to my LQS.

    Some LQS rent out their long arm quilting machines so you can quilt your own at their stores. Ask your local store.

  2. #77
    Super Member Melinda in Tulsa's Avatar
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    This is a suggestion I haven't seen mentioned here for those have trouble with puckers when SITD. If your machine has adjustable presser foot tension, you might try loosening that some so you presser foot isn't putting so much pressure on the extra layers. Just a thought.

  3. #78

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    thanks for the tip - I am sure that it is a case of finally hitting upon the correct tension number. there sure was a lot of good ideas here and I will definitely try them the next time I am brave enough to try once again. :lol:

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melinda in Tulsa
    This is a suggestion I haven't seen mentioned here for those have trouble with puckers when SITD. If your machine has adjustable presser foot tension, you might try loosening that some so you presser foot isn't putting so much pressure on the extra layers. Just a thought.
    I used to have few puckers on the cross seams after I had SIDed all of the lines in one direction and then quilted the other direction. The only thing that prevents those is if the sandwich is really taut and has no wiggle room to shift side to side.

    If you pucker on the initial seams, then your idea might work.

  5. #80
    Super Member Friendly Quilter's Avatar
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    I love your Avatar, I enjoy all sorts of quilting, Longarm, my reg. machine both SID and FM I have also done hand quilting. I am not really good at hand quilting but when people see your quilting they will love whatever you do. I think quilts sholuld be made with the person you are making it for not what prize you may get.

  6. #81
    Junior Member Derla's Avatar
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    I used to hand quilt and loved doing it, but it was way too slow. I'm in my 70s and have a lot more stash to use up. So now, when I get a couple of quilt tops pieced, I drive to a city about 90 miles away, and rent time on a computerized long arm quilting machine - love using those. I'm able to stay overnight with my son and his family and I have a mini-vacation.

    I've been reading about people's stash. How many yards of a fabric does one buy when there are no immediate plans for it's use?

  7. #82
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    Yep, I could see myself in your post. SID and straight line works for me. I will never enter my quilts in a show but they will pass the loved and warmth test every night for my friends and family.
    I think I fit right here also. I tried hand quilting on a frame. It went very slow and sometimes not so well. I've done it following near the seam and I've tried it 1/4 inch away from the seam using quilters' marking tape (whatever it's called). It looks alright to someone who hasn't quilted.

    Now I do machine quilting -- SID or cross-hatching. I also do hand lap quilting with or without a hoop. I've had a stroke on my right side and I'm right-handed. I'm fine but a bit clumbsy. So at times it goes well and at times kinda shaky. It took over 6 months for me to do my last attic windows (Can be seen before quilting on a thread MY ATTIC WINDOWS) The graduate (DGD) loves being wrapped in it. That's good enough for me.
    I'm doing a machine lap D9P quilt right now by cross-hatching. My next move is to sandwich my kaleidoscope quilt top that I made a few years ago. I can have it ready to stitch during those long "football-watching" months. [Can you tell I don't like football?] So just feel free to do what you can do and enjoy the process. Skill and confidence comes with practice. I could never win a contest, but as far as my grandchildren and relatives are concerned, the quilts are winners. Just do what you like and learn as you can. Good luck.

  8. #83
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    Yep, I could see myself in your post. SID and straight line works for me. I will never enter my quilts in a show but they will pass the loved and warmth test every night for my friends and family.
    I think I fit right here also. I tried hand quilting on a frame. It went very slow and sometimes not so well. I've stitched following near the seam and I've stitched 1/4 inch away from the seam using quilters' marking tape (whatever it's called). It looks alright to someone who hasn't quilted.

    Now I do machine quilting -- SID or cross-hatching. I also do hand lap quilting with or without a hoop. I've had a stroke on my right side and I'm right-handed. I'm fine now but a bit clumbsy. So at times it goes well and at times kinda shaky. (OH, and I cant' used a thimble. {{{shame on me}}} It took over 6 months for me to do my last attic windows (Can be seen before quilting on a thread MY ATTIC WINDOWS) The graduate (DGD) loves being wrapped in it. That's good enough for me.
    I'm doing a machine lap D9P quilt right now by cross-hatching. My next move is to sandwich my kaleidoscope quilt top that I made a few years ago. I can have it ready to stitch during those long "football-watching" months. [Can you tell I don't like football?] So just feel free to do what you can do and enjoy the process. Skill and confidence comes with practice. I could never win a contest, but as far as my grandchildren and relatives are concerned, the quilts are winners. Just do what you like and learn as you can. Good luck

    EDIT: And as you can see, I'm a klutz with the computer. Don't have a clue what happened here. I tried to edit, but the first one is the one I needed to make corrections. I suppose you get my gist. :lol:

  9. #84
    Senior Member kclausing's Avatar
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    I like the challenge of a free motion but only on smaller quilts. don't think I could do full or queeen size with free motion. For larger quilts, I also am a straight line quilter.

  10. #85
    Super Member Monika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    I signed up for a series of quilting-specific classes at my local dealer. The first one starts next week. So far, I have done OK with SID on my own but that is where the honeymoon ends. Figured that I have too much invested in my machines to not at least give it a shot.

    If it tenses you up (which is the worst thing to do when quilting) then no wonder that you don't enjoy it. I wonder: Do you not do well because you tense up, or do you set yourself up by tensing before you even start?

    Do you have an LQS in the area or somewhere that teaches machine quilting on the home sewing machine from start to finish?
    Where are you taking your class?

  11. #86
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I am not above drawing quilting stitches with a marker on my quilt, or using floss to handquilt big 4 stitches to an inch. I am whatever I like type of quilter.

  12. #87
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I do mostly FMQ and I love it, if you tense up it will show in your quilting. Just relax, wear gloves with rubber nubs and do it, the more you do the better you should be, when the binding is sewn on, wash and dry it, it will look great.

  13. #88
    Senior Member yellowsnow55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingleberry
    I do mostly FMQ and I love it, if you tense up it will show in your quilting. Just relax, wear gloves with rubber nubs and do it, the more you do the better you should be, when the binding is sewn on, wash and dry it, it will look great.
    What is the best batting to use for FMQ, I have been trying bamboo, but I don't find it fluffy enough after washing, great for baby quilts as its not so hot and great for our Australian climate.

  14. #89
    Senior Member yellowsnow55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingleberry
    I do mostly FMQ and I love it, if you tense up it will show in your quilting. Just relax, wear gloves with rubber nubs and do it, the more you do the better you should be, when the binding is sewn on, wash and dry it, it will look great.
    What is the best batting to use for FMQ, I have been trying bamboo, but I don't find it fluffy enough after washing, great for baby quilts as its not so hot and great for our Australian climate.

  15. #90
    Super Member mshawii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drivingsusan
    Although the fancy swirls and feathers are truly beautiful and amazing on other's quilts, I do believe that I will be a straight line quilter for the rest of my life---for all of the reasons stated above!!
    Straight line quilt the blocks and then go back and quilt the inside of the blocks. Just remember to sew one way to the left and the next row( side to side), go to the right, otherwise your quilt will want to angle that way. Then turn and go the other way (Top to bottom) There is a well known quilter that started doing her own quilts that way till she got more comfortable doing freehand in each block, then she started doing real freehand quilting. I have started doing small wall handings and table runners and I am working into larger items very slowly.

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monika

    Where are you taking your class?
    Meissner's at the main store in Sacramento. It's a whole series of 8 classes that starts with basic straight stitch quilting and the walking foot. It is 2 Thursdays in September, October, November, and December - all dedicated to quilting. The instructor is Florence Fong. First class is this Thursday.

  17. #92
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    I love FMQ. One tip that I got from leah Day's web site was to use a "supreme slider." It's a fantastic tool.. It's a sheet about 8 1/2" x 11" of a rubbery material that has a teflon coating on top. The rubbery side clings to your machine's flatbed and the teflon side is under your fabric. There is even a premade hole for the needle to go through. This little gadget reduces the friction from the weight of your quilt. It was a life saver for me.
    That, and practise. For practise, I use small quilt sandwiches that I make out of scrap. Then I just practise writing my name with thread! after a while the shoulders relax because after all, it's only my name - how intimidating can that be! My avatar is a quilt that I did micro stippling in every block on the cream part. The leaf and heart are minimally stitched.

  18. #93
    Dee
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    I do very little free motion. The feathers are beautiful, but haven't ventured into that yet.

  19. #94
    Super Member Monika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    Quote Originally Posted by Monika

    Where are you taking your class?
    Meissner's at the main store in Sacramento. It's a whole series of 8 classes that starts with basic straight stitch quilting and the walking foot. It is 2 Thursdays in September, October, November, and December - all dedicated to quilting. The instructor is Florence Fong. First class is this Thursday.
    I would love to hear how that is. I almost signed up for it myself!

  20. #95
    Senior Member yellowsnow55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjradj
    I love FMQ. One tip that I got from leah Day's web site was to use a "supreme slider." It's a fantastic tool.. It's a sheet about 8 1/2" x 11" of a rubbery material that has a teflon coating on top. The rubbery side clings to your machine's flatbed and the teflon side is under your fabric. There is even a premade hole for the needle to go through. This little gadget reduces the friction from the weight of your quilt. It was a life saver for me.
    That, and practise. For practise, I use small quilt sandwiches that I make out of scrap. Then I just practise writing my name with thread! after a while the shoulders relax because after all, it's only my name - how intimidating can that be! My avatar is a quilt that I did micro stippling in every block on the cream part. The leaf and heart are minimally stitched.
    Forgot to mention the supreme slider, great help to me

    :thumbup:

  21. #96
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    I am a straight line quilter and use various stitches to stitch in the ditch. For example, the scallop stitch creates a great quilted look when the quilt is complete. I think the large quilting machines are great, but I prefer the quilted, coverlet look. If you are new at quilting, make a kid's quilt in squares using a kid's pattern with a solid square in between. It's a great start! Make one large enough, 40 inches by 50, so that the child can use it in day care, napping, and wrapping up. The double stitching, basic and quilting, creates a LASTING one until the child grows out of it. God bless your new adventure. Joan

  22. #97
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    i'm pretty new and self taught. i enjoy hand quilting and like to stencil on designs or draw them myself.

  23. #98
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    Most of the time, I just bow to the inevitable and SID everywhere. But every so often I get a wild hair and do some simple stippling.

    As long as I remember to wear my quilter's gloves (the ones with the little sticky dots on the palm-sides), to look ahead of where I'm stitching (rather than where the needle is), and to move the foot pedal a tiny bit faster than I might think comfortable for me -- it works! Just be sure that there's nothing for your quilt to snag on, that you've got good ergonomics (neck and shoulders relaxed, forearms level, jaw unclenched). Then you can just let your mind "zone out" -- i.e., do a "zen" thing and get in touch with the stitching. Sounds kooky, but it helps!

    And most of all -- don't sweat it. It's just a quilt after all! :lol:

    Oh, yeah -- that slick slider doohicky is fabulous!! Well worth the money..........

  24. #99

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    I like to do my own quilting so I can say I did that quilt! So I have been anchoring the quilt with some SID and then meandering. As a result, I have had to have my Elna 6003 worked on and the timing fixed three times in about 10 months. As a result, I've decided to do only SID on my Elna using the walking foot. I think I'll look for an older machine on which the feed dogs will lower so I don't risk messing up my good machine any more. I think I'll look for an older machine that does straight stiches, will use a darning foot and is not computerized. This is my plan now. Who knows what I'll do a month or two down the road? I ordered the pattern for the home-built quilting table. Now I just need to get DH to built it and to convince him I need a mid or long arm machine. I'll sleep on these ideas a few nights and then see what happens.

  25. #100
    RST
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    Free motion improv -- you could not pay me to stitch in the ditch.

    RST

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