Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36

Thread: What Sewing Machine gave you problems

  1. #1
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,721
    I am trying to decide which sewing machine to buy. This gets really confusing. I thought if I get a lot of no :!: no :!: for certain brands I wouldn't buy them. :oops: help me

  2. #2
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,851
    My last commercial Singer ( I think it was C390) just did not hold up well. Cost around $450, and just as much in repairs over four years. What looked like metal was spray painted plastic. It was made in Brazil. I never will get another.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    57
    Oh gosh! Lol* It's hard to buy a sewing machine isn't it?? Lol*

    I don't have a very expensive machine. I have a Simplicity Quilter's Classic. I believe Simplicity machines owned/made by White. I love it! It was $159, but I traded in two older machines at my local sewing center and they gave it to me for $100 out the door. It does everything I need. It came with a dozen or more feet (zipper, darning, (2) 1/4 inch feet, zig zag, quilt bar, walking foot, and more. Some that I really honestly have no idea what they do yet!). It has about 20 different stitches, even an LCD screen. I have been using it for about a year now, and for a low cost basic machine I am very pleased. It even came with a 25 year warranty.

    My Mom has a Pfaff and loves it! (I love it too!) She bought it used, and if I remember correctly she paid somewhere around $1,000. It's wonderful, and she has used that particular machine for more than 10 years now. She still hasn't used all of it's functions. It has something like 1000 little embroidery patterns that come with it, and maybe, 100 different stitches. She is now talking about an upgrade, to a machine with full embroidery, however she's not had to take the Pfaff in for any repairs as far as I know in the time she's had it. The only thing that has burned out on it is the sensor that beeps to let you know your bobbin thread is low. I'm not sure if she's going to get another Pfaff though, because she mentioned to me that the company a few years back started making the machines in a different country and she feels the quality has suffered.

    I personally like the Viking machines you can get at some of the bigger Jo-Anns! They do a lot for a reasonable price, and you can take classes there to learn how to use different functions.

    The best place to go, in my opinion, would be to an indpenedent sew/vac shop, or sewing center if you have one in reasonable driving distance. We have one here, it's a Father & Son run business, their main focus is machines. They of course are going to want you to buy from them, but if they have refurbished used machines, they will be very knowledgeable about many brands. You may just find a used machine at a great price, or be able to trade your old machine in and get a discount. Of course Juki, Bernina, Viking, Pfaff, Singer, all those are very trusted respected name brands, and really, in my opinion, you can't go wrong with any well known brand. You may want to take into consideration where you must go for service/repairs, but honestly there is always someone no matter what brand you buy who has had an issue. I hear a lot about timing/tension issues with every brand - I even know a girl via blogging who's had a brand new Bernina for less than a year and had to take it in for tension problems. Go figure.

    I'm no epxert by any means, if anything I'm pretty inexperienced at purchasing machines! But I hope my super long post might help you out!!! :) Good luck, be sure to let us know what you end up going with! :)

  4. #4
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    Well, you know my answer, don'tcha!? I've only had brothers and they have both gave me trouble. (ironic for an only child).
    I guess I got my new one fixed. It's a refurbished one, and it hasn't acted up, yet, but I haven't used it too much.

    Which way you leaning so far???? Going with a combo or sewing only?

  5. #5
    marieg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    125
    Well I learned on a Singer treadle, ten Siger electric, the old black one, Still have it big and heavy. In my 20's I got my first machine a Singer Futurama, a piece of doodoo.
    Stuck with Singers until the 80's when I fially threw up my hands and got a used Pfaff. I now have a Pfaff 2056 and love it.
    So I guess I'm a Pfaff person.

  6. #6
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    Quote Originally Posted by marieg
    Well I learned on a Singer treadle, ten Siger electric, the old black one, Still have it big and heavy. In my 20's I got my first machine a Singer Futurama, a piece of doodoo.
    Stuck with Singers until the 80's when I fially threw up my hands and got a used Pfaff. I now have a Pfaff 2056 and love it.
    So I guess I'm a Pfaff person.
    I have an old Singer Treadle. It's a 1905 model (if I remember correctly).
    I have heard a lot of positive feedback on Pfaff machines. I've never used one, though.

  7. #7
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,721
    While I have been searching sewing machine I found a Janome tredle. Just think we could set up shop in a tent or porch......weather permitting
    :D

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bluphrog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Porter, TX
    Posts
    530
    I learned on a Sears Kenmore that my mom bought in 1955. We never had any problems with that. I bought a Singer in 1971 and used it until 2004. It was really heavy, the only thing plastic was the base it sat in and the case that latched on. Everything else was metal. It had a straight and zigzag stitch. The only reason I replaced it was because I couldn't wind bobbins on it any more. I loved it, but I've been told that the new Singers just don't hold up -- too much plastic, I guess. I got a Bernina Bernette, which I have since given to my son, and that was a nice little machine. Very portable, with a few decorative stitches, for a reasonable price. I now have a Bernina 440QE, which I love.

    For straight sewing, I've been told that the Singer Featherweights are the best, and they are great travel machines, since they only weigh 11 lbs.

    FYI, I was told by a salesperson in JoAnn's that the Whites are made by Husqvarna.

  9. #9
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruth Camp
    While I have been searching sewing machine I found a Janome tredle. Just think we could set up shop in a tent or porch......weather permitting
    :D
    Sounds fun to me.

  10. #10
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,282
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluphrog
    I learned on a Sears Kenmore that my mom bought in 1955. We never had any problems with that. I bought a Singer in 1971 and used it until 2004. It was really heavy, the only thing plastic was the base it sat in and the case that latched on. Everything else was metal. It had a straight and zigzag stitch. The only reason I replaced it was because I couldn't wind bobbins on it any more. I loved it, but I've been told that the new Singers just don't hold up -- too much plastic, I guess. I got a Bernina Bernette, which I have since given to my son, and that was a nice little machine. Very portable, with a few decorative stitches, for a reasonable price. I now have a Bernina 440QE, which I love.

    For straight sewing, I've been told that the Singer Featherweights are the best, and they are great travel machines, since they only weigh 11 lbs.

    FYI, I was told by a salesperson in JoAnn's that the Whites are made by Husqvarna.
    Things just aren't made the way they use to be...I guess they can't make them to last forever or they'd all go bankrupt instead of the purchasers...

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    1,907
    Personaly I think that any brand can have its ups and downs. I have Three Brothers right now, embroidery that sews also, sewing machine, and serger. I have never had to have one serviced. But then again I have a Kenmore that is from the eightys and as good as new. Just does not have all the newbies on it. I have in the past had Singer and had problems, but I found out at the time that Singer no longer owned it that White did and it was there lower end machine. But like I said in the beginning, it is like a car. It is a hit and miss thing. :D

  12. #12
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,721
    Wow this is crazy new whites are made in Asia Not all Kenmores are Janome...........Janome is Asia.........You can not mail order a Viking they don't allow it......... some sites say simplicity is from white........ :roll: :roll: :roll:

    I did find a nice simplicity called American Quilter SA2400........any comments these are hard to find.....a lot of good reviews when i could find them of simplicity machines

  13. #13
    Senior Member Caroltee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Somewhere "N" Time
    Posts
    597
    I don't mean to offend anyone by this remark but……….. YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR.

  14. #14
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,721
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&Item=200077362100&Category=3118&_trksid=p3907.m29

    This is the one i am looking at......from what i have read in reviews price doesn't have much to do with it. A top machine in one brand was 79 dollars............others complained about a 1400 dollar one. You just have to look and read...and find just what you need and then cross your fingers :D :D :D :D

  15. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    56
    Hi Ruth...excellent question. I've been sewing for 46 years. My first machine was a 1949 Necchi. Superb machine. Second machine was a 1985 Singer..very good machine. Third machine is a Pfaff..also excellent machine.

    Lots of folks have told me they would love to sew if their machine just worked. I ask about their machine and it almost always turns out they or their mom or sister got the machine at some discount store or department store..the $199 to $349 kind. Bottom line; cheap machines aren't worth it.
    If your aim is to just run up a hem now and then, or make a pair of curtains...it's ok. But even half-way serious sewing needs a good machine.
    So don't skimp...it's a waste of money.

  16. #16
    Love2Quilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Manitoba
    Posts
    112
    Hi Ruth. I have a pfaff and love love love it. I have had no problems with it other then the odd adjustment due to my running over pins.

    I love the IDT. Its great.

    When looking for a machine, I made a list of what I wanted. did I want needle up/down, auto cut off. One touch reverse. among other things.
    I'm sure your in for many answer to this question. I found the list really helped me in my decision. My Pfaff is now 8 years old, and I still love it.

    I did have an Elna, lets just say, I'm glad its gone, and I will never purchase another.

    But like everyone, some machine are good for you and some arn't

    Good luck in your search and the final decision.

    Karen

  17. #17
    robbijmorris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Amarillo,TX
    Posts
    112
    I learned as a child on my mom's old singer. I love the older singers, and will go out of my way to buy one, or to let mom know where one is. I bought a singer when we lived overseas, because the one my mom gave me siezed up (probably high humidity). It was a piece of do-do. I got to where I wouldn't even sew, because it was giving me trouble. I finally let my husband know I really hate it, and that is when I got my refurbished Bernina. I absolutely love it. It is a little bernette, and I still sew all sorts of stuff on it all the time. Hope this helps!


  18. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    57
    Ruth - that is very similar to the machine I have. I think the one you were looking at might be a step or two up from mine even. Here's a link to the exact machine I have:

    http://www.sewshop.com/Simplicity-quilters_classic_sw240.htm

    My machine also came with the table attatchment. Like I said I've had it for a year now and I love it. I have two small children, so I'm on a budget, and this was what I could afford at this point int my life. I'm so happy, I can't complain one bit, so far I've had no problems. When I first brought the machine home my 1/4 inch foot broke, and I went online to Simplicity.com and within three days I recieved a replacement at no cost to me. The service was excellent, all they required was a serial number and my address.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Missi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kansas - north west corner
    Posts
    550
    I learned to sew on her Viking and always felt like the machine would take me with it when I sewed, I joked about the cha-chunk noises it made when it sewed. It died and she bought a Janome that she didn't like, said it wasn't heavy enough to mend my dad's jeans. So I got it, and love, love, love it for quilting. It is one of the first memory craft machines that they made. Mom got a new viking and HATES it for quilting. She has a heck of a time with the 1/4" foot.
    Don't forget about the extra feet. Some brands will cost you an arm and a leg for the walking foot or their special 1/4" foot.

  20. #20
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    North East Lower peninsula of Michigan
    Posts
    6,230
    My first machine was a Brother that my husband bought me for our 1st christmas in 71, It still works but was very basic, straight stitch. A few years later I bought a used Kenmore with cams for $25.00 that I used up until a few months ago (it works great but is very heavy, I bought a Brother from a resale shop for $40.00 with a cabinent it is pretty basic straight and zig zag but works great. I have a treadle machine but need a belt. I have never had any of them in for repairs. Maybe I was just lucky.

  21. #21
    Super Member Baren*eh*ked_canadian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    1,960
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruth Camp
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&Item=200077362100&Category=3118&_trksid=p3907.m29

    This is the one i am looking at......from what i have read in reviews price doesn't have much to do with it. A top machine in one brand was 79 dollars............others complained about a 1400 dollar one. You just have to look and read...and find just what you need and then cross your fingers :D :D :D :D

    I think that's the one I want also :)

  22. #22
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Wichita KS
    Posts
    753
    any kind of Brother brand from Walmart...I had to take it back twice and finally just got my Janome Memorycraft 4800...it is a dream machine, I don't regret the extra cost. The quality is well worth it.

  23. #23
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,087
    I bought a nice new Elna computerized machine (retail $1500 but I got it on sale for under $1000) in 1992. It was a piece of JUNK. Every plastic piece on it eventually broke off. Now I drive a 35 yo Viking Turissa and love it.

  24. #24
    Junior Member imaquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    243
    Used to own a top of the line Bernina (at the time I bought it - they just keep getting better and more and more expensive ALL BRANDS) and loved it! But we then became an authorized Pfaff dealer at our quilt shop and I sold the Bernina. Started using a Pfaff and fell in deeper love. For a quilter, you absolutely CAN NOT beat the IDT! Accurate piecing, even top and bottom fabric feed whether you are sewing the top together or quilting the quilt itself. I will never buy another brand now. I believe that Janome now has a similar mechanism on some of their machines. But, Pfaff owned the patent on it for over 20 years. They have worked out all the kinks in the IDT. Pfaff is the original.

    All of that being said, what we used to tell all of our customers is this: "Buy the most expensive and nicest machine you can afford now. You can always grow into a machine that has functions and capabilities you may not think you need. But, when you outgrow one, all you can do is suffer through it or get a minimal return on your investment and upgrade."

    I could go on and on. Hubby being a service tech for all brands of sewing machines knows all the "inner workings" of all brands. You really do get what you pay for. I can tell you that the most well made brands out there are Bernina and Pfaff. Stitches and functions, bells and whistles aside we did the least amount of repairs on those brands and they are just simply better built.

    Good Luck! I know it is a huge decision.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Roben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SW IA
    Posts
    900
    Ruth, you've gotten some really great advice. I can only add that in my experience, where you get it is just as important than what you get, especially as the machines move up the money ladder. When I wanted to really get into sewing, I went to a Viking Dealer. I want to be able to pick up the phone, or grab a machine and project and go for help, classes and an excuse to be around other sewers. I've been fortunate in that I was able to get a Scandinavia 400 and a used Designer 1. The 400 was new and I love her to death; I relied on the dealer for the D1 and have had many problems with it. I'm doing all my quilting on the 400.

    I've been told many things by dealers and their employees; my best advice is to ask for recommendations, visit and learn who you feel comfortable with. If something doesn't sound quite right; trust your instincts and walk away until you can check it out with others who have that brand of machine. Its a lot of money, even for a smaller machine. I've found a new dealer who didn't balk at my having the service manual for my D1 (I've been that desperate!), who has classes and teachers I can learn from, who doesn't let 'user error' be the first words out and is happy when I walk in the door. I went in the other day and within the first minute of looking at the Babylock Quest I was asked if I'd like to sew on it (some dealers I've been to won't let you actually sit at a machine and sew - they don't get my money.)

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.