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Thread: What would be the easiest way to......?

  1. #1
    Super Member Central Ohio Quilter's Avatar
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    I have some "redwork" designs that I printed off a web site that I would like to embroider for inserting into a quilt.

    What would be the easiest way to transfer these redwork designs onto a piece of fabric to embroider?

    Looking for ideas! Thanks!

  2. #2
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    Tape the pattern with fabric on top to a piece of glass with a light underneath or to a window & then trace your pattern onto the fabric. A lamp under a glass top table works great.

  3. #3
    Super Member Theresa's Avatar
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    When you trace it, be sure to use something that will easily wash out.

  4. #4
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    DOn't use fade-away pen either though. Ask me why I know that. ggggggg

  5. #5
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I would do like adonnajean said and use a pin point blue wash out pen

  6. #6
    Super Member Central Ohio Quilter's Avatar
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    Great idea! Thanks!

    Any recommendations for what kind of marking pen that you like best, that washes out easily, but will stay on the fabric for as long as you need it to?

  7. #7
    Power Poster sharon b's Avatar
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    The blue fabric washable pen ? Not sure what the name is , sorry

  8. #8
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    for me (and my granddaughter and i both are always working on embroideries) always use a fine point pencil. the lines can be seen, do not rub off, but do wash out. i've tried dozens of different products out there, but always go back to a good ole pencil. and you can use a white pencil on dark fabrics.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    for me (and my granddaughter and i both are always working on embroideries) always use a fine point pencil. the lines can be seen, do not rub off, but do wash out. i've tried dozens of different products out there, but always go back to a good ole pencil. and you can use a white pencil on dark fabrics.
    Sounds like the best idea. Just keep the lines as light as possible.

  10. #10
    Super Member Darlene's Avatar
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    I use a light box now but I was taping the design to the fabric and holding it up to the window or sliding door and tracing with a #2 pencil. The light box is much faster and my arms don't get tired. I got the light box at Joann's for $14.99 minus a 50% off coupon. It was in the scrapbooking dept.

  11. #11
    Senior Member PiecesinMn's Avatar
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    I am finishing the last block on a redwork quilt, the instructions were to use double thickness muslin or what you want to trace on. Baste the two thicknesses together. Put the pattern down on a counter or table top (I taped in down). Put the basted fabric on top of that and trace with a fine tip ink fabric pen. I used black ink to trace and two strands of thread to outline. The pattern I traced from was very dark lines so I didn't need a light box. The lines I traced were thin so that the 2 strands of floss covered them up. It worked great. Of course, if you are going to use a dark fabric to trace on, this isn't going to work. Hope this makes sense.

  12. #12
    Super Member Central Ohio Quilter's Avatar
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    PiecesinMN - what was the purpose of using the two pieces of muslin? For greater stability?

    Did embroidering through 2 layers of fabric make it more difficult to embroider?

    Did you like using the double layers, or was it more of a hassle?

    Sorry so many questions, but I just never heard of that before!

  13. #13
    Super Member Central Ohio Quilter's Avatar
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    I don't have a light box, but I do have a glass topped table in my living room. I can put some kind of light under the table and that should work great!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Central Ohio Quilter
    PiecesinMN - what was the purpose of using the two pieces of muslin? For greater stability?

    Did embroidering through 2 layers of fabric make it more difficult to embroider?

    Did you like using the double layers, or was it more of a hassle?

    Sorry so many questions, but I just never heard of that before!
    I would like to know, too.

  15. #15
    Super Member Janetlmt's Avatar
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    I saw this little trick on a quilting show. Turn a clear plastic sweater box over with the bottom up. Then use a light underneath it to illuminate it. I saw those little round push top dome lights at the dollar store. They would work great. I have a light box and I use it for my redwork and other embroidery projects. I also use two layers of muslin or other fabric for the embroidery also. I use a fine point Mark B Gone pen to draw the design. It washes out easily.
    Peace and Blessings

  16. #16
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
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    I was lucky enough to find a light box on a garage sale but up until then I used a transluscent storage tube, a window or sometimes even my computer screen. You can also use a tv screen. Just go to a channel that's all snow and mute the tv. The only thing you have to do then is remember to use removable tape.

  17. #17
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Central Ohio Quilter
    PiecesinMN - what was the purpose of using the two pieces of muslin? For greater stability?

    Did embroidering through 2 layers of fabric make it more difficult to embroider?

    Did you like using the double layers, or was it more of a hassle?

    Sorry so many questions, but I just never heard of that before!
    I'm not Pieces, but I would think the reason to use two layers is so that the embroidery therad on the wrong side doesn't "shadow" through to the right side later on. Muslin can be fairly sheer, and you might not notice the shadowing effect until you make the quilt sandwich, at which point it would be too late.

  18. #18
    Super Member marymm's Avatar
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    I've taken a couple of classes on redwork. One instructor had us use a very thin permanent marker (RED) (available at quilt shops or JoAnn's in my area) to trace the patterns. The two pieces of fabric really do help avoid the shadows.
    Also, if you ever get a chance, try the Premium Sulky 300 mm, 100 percent cotton thread. It comes on a big spool, is machine washable or dry cleanable and comes in a beautiful dark red. It is a bit pricier than than DMC or whatever, but a spool goes a long way. I get it at one of our local quilt shops I have always hated separating out the different strands of embroidery thread. Silly, I know.

  19. #19
    Senior Member PiecesinMn's Avatar
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    Sorry it took so long to respond. No access to computer. The purpose of two layers is exactly what someone answered, your knots and stitches don't shadow through. It's not more difficult to embroider but you do need to baste the two pieces together before you trace your pattern. I didn't think it would really be all that great, but it really worked for me. Using a thin point fabric pen (which I think in permanent and stitching over it is much better than using those blue wash out pens. I have had a bad experience with them and don't care to use them. Give it a try, hope you like it to.
    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by Central Ohio Quilter
    PiecesinMN - what was the purpose of using the two pieces of muslin? For greater stability?

    Did embroidering through 2 layers of fabric make it more difficult to embroider?

    Did you like using the double layers, or was it more of a hassle?

    Sorry so many questions, but I just never heard of that before!
    I'm not Pieces, but I would think the reason to use two layers is so that the embroidery therad on the wrong side doesn't "shadow" through to the right side later on. Muslin can be fairly sheer, and you might not notice the shadowing effect until you make the quilt sandwich, at which point it would be too late.

  20. #20
    Super Member maine ladybug's Avatar
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    I think the blue wash out pen is by Clover. The other brand I have used is Collins. Haven't had any trouble getting either of them out after doing redwork. I use the Sulky thread instead of floss too.

  21. #21
    Super Member marymm's Avatar
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    The permanent red pen is pigma marker, I believe. I've also used them in different colors for embellishing and writing on quilt labels....

  22. #22
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    for me (and my granddaughter and i both are always working on embroideries) always use a fine point pencil. the lines can be seen, do not rub off, but do wash out. i've tried dozens of different products out there, but always go back to a good ole pencil. and you can use a white pencil on dark fabrics.
    I do this too...some products just don't work as well and the pencil is a lot cheaper!

  23. #23
    Super Member leaha's Avatar
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    I pin my muslin to my pattern so nothing shifts, then if I am going to do a red work like my campbells soup kid, I use a red jellyroll pen to trace the pattern with it on my light box.

  24. #24
    Super Member LAQUITA's Avatar
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    i was shown something today at a LQS that has a new kind of transfer paper. You run it through your printer and then peal off the backing and it sticks to your material. Her stitch through the transfer and then place the project in water and it lifts right off. NO stickiness no lines.It's great new stuff......I don't remember the name though sorry.

  25. #25
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    I'm jumping in here too. Instead of basting muslin on the back of my embroidery fabric, I fuse a layer of light weight fusible on the back of the blocks, after I trace the design with a fine point pencil. All the handling it does pill a little but I think it is much easier to manage than the basted fabric. I use a hoop when I hand embroider, but a friend does the fusing, and likes it better because she doesn't embroider with one. Have fun, I love how relaxing the hand work is in the evening....and keeps me from snacking because I don't want to get the fabric dirty :)

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