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Thread: What would be the easiest way to......?

  1. #26
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    There is a new pencil out there called Sketch and Wash. Need to give it a try!

  2. #27
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    I have a Bohin eversharp pencil with a fine lead to use, love it. The leads come in several colors, including white. Not available everywhere but ask for it in the quilt shops. There is also another Bohin transfer set that is used for quilting but the leads are very large, they work great for longarm guidance.

    I do alot of transferring for embroidery and quilting and have found some pencils in the art dept. One is General's Scribe All, comes in black and white; another is Dixon Photomark. The General's pencils are water soluble and do go away with washing, although embroidery usually covers the lines.
    A good and large light box is still a good investment, beats standing next to a window and copying designs.
    Carol J.

  3. #28
    pal
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    I use a light box and regular pencil, and a non fusible interfacing which I baste onto my fabric after so that you don't see the connections through the fabric.

    Made a mistake on my current embroidery - which I'll never do again - but it is too late for this one. I used a really good muslin which is too dense, and three threads of embroidery floss. It's really hard to pull through and the three threads makes the picture look coarse.

  4. #29
    Senior Member foxxigrani's Avatar
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    When I was first thinking about doing redwork, Simply quilts had a show on it. You can see how long ago that was. She said she uses a pencil it is covered by the time you are done anyway. I have used a pencil for all of mine. Don't use it too heavy it will show, but pencil works best for me. Then I took a old scanner I had bought at a thrift store, bought some cheap light strips to go inside took out all the insides and I have a light box. It was easy to do and not at all expensive.

    Rita.

  5. #30
    PEP
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    At Jo Ann Fabrics they have pencils that once you have traced your pattern onto tissue paper (that's what I use)
    then turn it over and use this pencil and retrace the pattern on the back, or what is the wrong side, then iron this onto your fabric. There are directions on the pencil.

  6. #31
    Marianna48's Avatar
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    I also use a normal pencil for tracing. It doesn't fade and even after some time I still can see the lines. I do take a very thin pencil. You have now those pink pencils of that special TM, but I can't recall the name of the brand. You have loads of quilting supplies of them. They also have those normal thin pencils. I normally don't baste two layers of fabric ofr muslin together. here in Holland that is expensive too, so I use some iron on stabilizer and that works well for me. I choose the more expensive type as that one is a lot softer and for embroidering it is easier to slide your needle through the fabric.

  7. #32

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    I use my kitchen table. Open it up, like for when you add the extension piece, and I have an old bus window that I lay over the gap and put a lamp underneath and go at it. I was fortunate at the bus garage that they wanted to get rid of 18 windows. All I wanted was 1 but got stuck with them all.

  8. #33
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    You can also tape it to a window or a patio door.

  9. #34
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Central Ohio Quilter
    I have some "redwork" designs that I printed off a web site that I would like to embroider for inserting into a quilt.

    What would be the easiest way to transfer these redwork designs onto a piece of fabric to embroider?

    Looking for ideas! Thanks!
    Use the light table - but, use watercolor pencil. It's designed to be water soluble. As long as you don't get it wet it will stay on the fabric.

  10. #35
    Power Poster Mariposa's Avatar
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    I use a mechanical pencil to get a very fine line. Have had no problems. I too am curious about the 2 layers of fabric--Is it because you don't want knots, etc. to show through? :)

  11. #36
    Super Member AnnaK's Avatar
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    If you have a glass coffee table (or any kind of table), just put a lamp underneath and save yourself from having to get a light box.

  12. #37
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    Spray bast your paper with the pattern and stick it to the fabric before placing it on your light source. I have real problems with patterns shifting around if I don't.

  13. #38

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    I use Freezer paper cut to needed size, and iron muslin to it. Insert into copier the pattern that you want to copy, make certain that muslin/freezer paper is inserted with muslin side down in the paper feed, hit copy, and walla- ready to stitch after removing freezer paper. Works great for me. Good luck-

  14. #39
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    i've done one red work quilt with single layer muslin - no show thru because i never knot the back of my embroudry. i weave my thread back thru some of the stitches i've just finished. and i never travel from one part of the design unless i can travel thru stitches

  15. #40
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    Me too. Years ago I belonged to EGA when life was simpler and they taught us how to embroidery without knots or traveling. Once you learn it is really nice. You put a knot on your thread and enter from the front , and put this knot several inches away from where you plan to embroidery. You now have a knot on the top and the thread is on the bottom. You do your embroidery and then go back and clip your knot that is several inches away on the frontside pull the thread through to the backside and weave in.

  16. #41
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    When I do redwork, I trace the pattern onto the fabric with a .o5 micron pigma pen. I know, I know it doesn't wash out, but--as you stitch you actually cover the thin lines that the pen makes, plus it is red and matches the thread, so even if a bit is left showing, it just looks like its the thread.
    I'm also working on an Antique Ladies embroidery piece on gray fabric. I used the .05 black pen to draw the detail and now am using black tatting thread to do the embroidery. It is working great. Makes a beautiful line of embroidery.

  17. #42
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    what is redwork?

  18. #43
    Rose Lee's Avatar
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    There is a red transfer pencil that you can buy. You go over the design with the transfer pencil and then iron it to your fabric. Remember that the transfer will appear in reverse if you use the transfer pencil on the right side of the paper. You could print the patterns in reverse and then go over them with a pencil. Do not use fabric softner on material if you wash it, this will help towards a better transfer.
    Good Luck

  19. #44
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    Redwork is when an embroider block or quilt is all done in red embroidery thread.

  20. #45
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    http://quiltbug.com/articles/redwork.htm there is a picture here and an explaination

  21. #46
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    Thank you it is beautiful

  22. #47
    Super Member sylvia77's Avatar
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    Using 2 layers of fabric gives it more stability.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Central Ohio Quilter
    I have some "redwork" designs that I printed off a web site that I would like to embroider for inserting into a quilt.

    What would be the easiest way to transfer these redwork designs onto a piece of fabric to embroider?

    Looking for ideas! Thanks!
    COQ All you have to do is make a copy with a coper then trace over that pattern to leave the org for another time.Now you take a Iron pen you trace all over the pattern. this makes your pattern Iron on transfer.or you can get some
    Tranafer-eze its made my Bird BrainDesign.net. ait says easiest, fastest, way to transfer design for embroidery,applique machine and hand quilting .punch needle and more.
    I hope this helps
    Any time i do hand emb work I use a good grade of muslin then I use a piece of batting. Doing it this way kind of pre-quilts the block. Several have started doing this after seing how mine came out

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Central Ohio Quilter
    I have some "redwork" designs that I printed off a web site that I would like to embroider for inserting into a quilt.

    What would be the easiest way to transfer these redwork designs onto a piece of fabric to embroider?

    Looking for ideas! Thanks!
    You can use a transfer pencil and iron the pattern onto the fabric. Just make sure the point of the pencil is kept shar-p, or y our embroidery will not cover the line. The ironed on pencil mark eventually washes out, but it takes more than one wash.

  25. #50
    Super Member leaha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leaha
    I pin my muslin to my pattern so nothing shifts, then if I am going to do a red work like my campbells soup kid, I use a red jellyroll pen to trace the pattern with it on my light box.
    this is my red work,

    close up
    Name:  Attachment-115239.jpe
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Size:  39.5 KB

    little red work quilt and campbells doll from the 1930's
    Name:  Attachment-115240.jpe
Views: 15
Size:  38.0 KB

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