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Thread: what would you do?

  1. #1
    Junior Member kerrytaylor's Avatar
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    I am piecing my first quilt top. My original plan was to send it out to have the quilting done but as its progressed I wonder if I can/should try to machine quilt it myself. My lightweight Brother came w a quilting foot. At this point I don't even know how to attach it to the machine. I know people do this on these little machines and it looks great. I just don't know HOW to do it, how to squish all of that fabric into such a tiny area and actually be able to sew at the same time and have it remain a quilt rather than a balled,up, seam ripped mess. This quilt, mind you, is queen size. Does anyone know of a good tutorial or have thoughts on this topic? For those of you have done this, what has yor experience been? I know I need to practice, practice, practice but I think I need more than that.

  2. #2
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Get on You Tube and look for Machine Quilting videos....there are some great videos that show you exactly how to do it.

    Good luck...come back here for help.

  3. #3
    Super Member wuv2quilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jljack
    Get on You Tube and look for Machine Quilting videos....there are some great videos that show you exactly how to do it.

    Good luck...come back here for help.
    Thanks jljack...I've been wondering the same thing. :)

  4. #4
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
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    I think a queen size would be very difficult as your 1st attempt. I would practice on something smaller. I do like to finish quilts myself while my sister was one to send hers out to be quilted.

  5. #5
    Junior Member kerrytaylor's Avatar
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    This quilt is a d9p. I wasnt going to do anything intricate or "swirly". I was only going to follow the shapes of each block - straight lines the whole way. I definately need to study - youtube I will definately look at - and take a deep breath. Intimidating!

  6. #6
    Super Member LoriEl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donnajean
    I think a queen size would be very difficult as your 1st attempt. I would practice on something smaller. I do like to finish quilts myself while my sister was one to send hers out to be quilted.
    My thoughts exactly. I started with a twin size with simple stitch in the ditch. I did one queen size but it wasn't easy!

  7. #7
    Junior Member kerrytaylor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoriEl
    Quote Originally Posted by donnajean
    I think a queen size would be very difficult as your 1st attempt. I would practice on something smaller. I do like to finish quilts myself while my sister was one to send hers out to be quilted.
    My thoughts exactly. I started with a twin size with simple stitch in the ditch. I did one queen size but it wasn't easy!
    How did your queen size turn out?

  8. #8
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    I've done one queen and used stitch in the ditch. There are differences of opinion on whether to start in the middle or on an edge. Having it pinned or spray basted really well is crucial, as is the pressing before you quilt. I rolled up on the side I wanted under the throat but it didn't stay rolled very well. I ended up just crumpling it! Having a table behind the machine and to the side for the rest of the quilt to rest upon is helpful.

  9. #9
    Senior Member quilter1430's Avatar
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    Believe me ... you do not want to quilt your queen sized quilt (and first quilt at that) on your domestic sewing machine. It will be a disaster. It's a challenge for even experienced quilters. You will end up being frustrated and will need to take out stitches. If you do want to try quilting on your machine, start with a practice piece, not the real thing.

  10. #10
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Practice and Youtube- that's what I've been doing :D

  11. #11
    Super Member ssgramma's Avatar
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    It is NOT easy period and especially on a lightweight Brother. It CAN be done but I sure wouldn't do it again. I have the whatever 6000 "quilting" machine and have done quite a few small things. Then I did just wavy, straight lines on one to cover the sofa and another for the loveseat.

    Then I got a vintage Singer 201 to put in a cabinet I already had. Her name is Miss MAM and she will not be "pushed around" by any quilt :-)

    And that Brother has been put away ever since. I will only need it as backup and for deco stitches.

  12. #12
    Junior Member kerrytaylor's Avatar
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    I go back and forth as to wht to do. I will pin baste like crazy or now am considering spray as a better option. I heard I can buy some clamp things that help keep it rolled up, don't know how well they work and I want to start in the middle. Yup, trying to get it under the foot and not having the backing end up looking like a drawstring purse. . . Oh the visions I've had! Why am I still tempted. Practice is key.

  13. #13
    Junior Member kerrytaylor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssgramma
    It is NOT easy period and especially on a lightweight Brother. It CAN be done but I sure wouldn't do it again. I have the whatever 6000 "quilting" machine and have done quite a few small things. Then I did just wavy, straight lines on one to cover the sofa and another for the loveseat.

    Then I got a vintage Singer 201 to put in a cabinet I already had. Her name is Miss MAM and she will not be "pushed around" by any quilt :-)

    And that Brother has been put away ever since. I will only need it as backup and for deco stitches.
    Oh dear. So the Brother was my reintro to sewing after years of nothing but mending, curtains, etc. Christmas is coming, right?

  14. #14
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    I am fairly new to the quilting by machine part of quilting, too...I found great videos on youtube, started with some smaller projects, have taken out countless stitches :-), and finally feel that I am getting it..biggest I have done so far is a full size quilt. I also only spray baste, and only use 505 to do it..there is a great vid on youtube about that, too...it is in with a 4 step tutorial on free motion quilting. If you can, watch all of the steps, they are very helpful! In my opinion, stitch in the ditch (or rather about 1/8" away) is easier than the free motion...I have done it several times, and rarely have to take out stitches on it...I have used both a walking foot (even feed foot) and just my regular foot..If I use batting such as warm and natural, and spray baste, then my regular foot actually works better than the walking foot...for me, anyways... I can see where you would like to see the quilt through to its completion...so, as the others have said, practice, practice, check out youtube vids, do a few smaller projects first, like on a preprinted quilt panel, etc...and, I also got on Amazon and bought several great books on machine quilting...
    Good luck to you!
    K

  15. #15
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    start with small practice pieces- and when you are comfortable with the process and happy with the quilting move up to a bit larger and larger until you are comfortable with quilting bed size quilt.
    it is certainly do-able but it takes practice- and patience.
    start with 12" squares- then maybe placemats- on up to a baby quilt ect-

  16. #16
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    I have done an oversized twin and it was nuts how hard it was. i was sid around star points though. I will not be trying anything larger than a twin on my domestic again. but I don't do larger than lap or baby size. for the most part. working on a full size right now and it is going to be sent out for quilting. good luck if you do try it yourself. and i would roll it in a tube to fit in the throat area. it will help.

  17. #17
    Senior Member carolynbb's Avatar
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    As we speak I am using a domestic Singer to machine quilt a slightly larger than twin size. It is the largest project I have attempted. (I'm still a newbie) I had never changed the foot on my machine until a few weeks ago - finally got the book out, read it and changed feet and cleaned the machine. It was much easier than I thought it would be.
    As for the quilting on small machine - it is tough bit I'm getting it accomplished. The clamps to keep it rolled up went by the wayside as the fabric ends up all crazy directions and shapes. I'm doing a basic straight stitch but having to turn the quilt often. It's not what I'd call "fun" but the more I do it the better I become and I've learned little tricks to make it somewhat easier. I definately will not attempt anything larger because this (quilt making) is suppose to for relaxation and enjoyment!! Might learn to quilt-as-you-go or just do small projects.

  18. #18
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would split the batting into 3 sections, which greatly reduces bulk under the arm of a domestic machine. Marti Michel (sp?) has a book out on how to do this, called Quilting in Sections (or something like that).

    By quilting foot, do you mean a walking foot? There is a big difference between using a walking foot and free-motion quilting using a darning foot with the feed dogs lowered.

    I advise staying away from stitch-in-the-ditch for a first attempt. I personally do not even try this anymore because I am always dis-satisfied with the results. It sounds easy, but I am someone who notices every little deviation and it is *hard* to stay exactly in-the-ditch!

    The easiest way to machine quilt that I have come across uses the walking foot to create gentle waving lines from one end of the quilt to the other. You can do these in two directions to create a wavy grid pattern (although then there is a concern about potential puckers at the line intersections). Straight lines are a little more difficult in that any deviation will show up as a "mistake". With wavy lines, there are no "mistakes".

    Also, you need to learn how to baste your quilt sandwich together. My recommendation is spray basting.

    Another recommendation I make is to starch the backing fabric heavily before layering (I use a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water). This stabilizes the backing fabric to prevent puckers. I also spray starch the top (different method than I use for backing yardage).

  19. #19
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    Which Brother to do you have? I have the XL3750 that came with quilting accessories. It works just fine for machine quilting, I haven't had any problems.

  20. #20
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    The first quilt that I quilted was a double size. I did SID and it came out great.It has been used constantly since I made it and the person I gave it to loves it. You might like to check Leah Days website. It is very good and gives me confidence.

  21. #21
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerrytaylor
    This quilt is a d9p. I wasnt going to do anything intricate or "swirly". I was only going to follow the shapes of each block - straight lines the whole way. I definately need to study - youtube I will definately look at - and take a deep breath. Intimidating!
    Your first post mentioned a "quilting foot". Not sure of your definition of such, but what you really want to use if following straight lines is a "walking foot" which will feed the top and bottom layers thru and under the needle evenly to help avoid tucks on the back. PIN, PIN, PIN, lots!! Keep in mind when you are pinning to stay away from the lines you want to stitich along so you don't have to remove them every couple of inches or so. But, having said all that, I suggest you start with a smaller quilt to get some practice in first. :-o

  22. #22
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    This may sound silly but it will give you an idea of what you will have to deal with....do you have a queen size quilt at home or one to borrow? Play with it at your machine (no sewing) to realize how much fabric you will have to manuever in and around your machine. It can be done with lots and lots of patience. Been there, done that and will never do that again. Anything larger than twin gets sent out. Good luck!

  23. #23
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emerald46
    This may sound silly but it will give you an idea of what you will have to deal with....do you have a queen size quilt at home or one to borrow? Play with it at your machine (no sewing) to realize how much fabric you will have to manuever in and around your machine. It can be done with lots and lots of patience. Been there, done that and will never do that again. Anything larger than twin gets sent out. Good luck!
    That's a GREAT idea! :thumbup:

  24. #24
    Super Member ssgramma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerrytaylor
    Quote Originally Posted by ssgramma
    It is NOT easy period and especially on a lightweight Brother. It CAN be done but I sure wouldn't do it again. I have the whatever 6000 "quilting" machine and have done quite a few small things. Then I did just wavy, straight lines on one to cover the sofa and another for the loveseat.

    Then I got a vintage Singer 201 to put in a cabinet I already had. Her name is Miss MAM and she will not be "pushed around" by any quilt :-)

    And that Brother has been put away ever since. I will only need it as backup and for deco stitches.
    Oh dear. So the Brother was my reintro to sewing after years of nothing but mending, curtains, etc. Christmas is coming, right?
    Don't get me wrong here - I like the machine a lot but it is just not easy pushing a large amount of fabric through it. It is very light and moves when you shove. That is why I'm liking my 30+ lb big black Singer set into a cabinet. She won't be shoved LOL

    I would try the method using only 1/3 of the batting at a time if I had to quilt on it again.

  25. #25
    Super Member SuziC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jljack
    Get on You Tube and look for Machine Quilting videos....there are some great videos that show you exactly how to do it.

    Good luck...come back here for help.
    Ditto!!

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