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Thread: When Binding by machine....

  1. #1
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    When Binding by machine....

    How do you make sure that you don't get too much binding on the back side?

    I always seem to get the right amount on the front and too much on the back, causing a lip of fabric.

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    I usually use 2 1/4" binding, folded in half.

    Hopefully you can see from the picture what I mean. There should be a lot less binding to the inside of the quilt on the back, shouldn't there?

    Thanks.

    Watson

  2. #2
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    I find binding by machine more difficult than it should be. Yes, mine turns out like yours and I don’t like it either.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    I only did one very small wall hanging that way and it was tough. I went back to the regular way after that.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  4. #4
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I make a sandwich with same batting and same fabric then make a test
    with same binding fabric and same width. I don't get it right on the edge
    but it's pretty close. Otherwise I get a lot of hit and miss then have to
    redo it by hand which defeats the whole purpose of sewing the binding
    by machine. You might have to adjust the width at which you sew your
    binding a little. I like a larger binding on most of my quilts so I cut mine
    2.5" and it finishes at 3/8". Or you could cut your binding a little narrower
    like 2" and make a test.

  5. #5
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    I manage this adjusting how far from the edge I stitch when sewing the binding to the front.

    Sew 4-6", then fold binding around and see how much of a lip there will be. Sometimes I even stitch it to the back, using a long stitch, if I'm not sure.

    The lip is usually too wide, so I move the needle one click to the left (widening the seam allowance). Restitch that 4-6" chunk, then fold it over and check again.

    Keep doing this until I have it just where I like it. I aim for less than a millimetre of lip sticking out.

    Instead of pins or basting clips, I will often use strips of 1/4" wide double-sided fusible to attach the binding to the back. This way I can check the lip (approximately) as I iron it in place, and I know it won't shift as I sew it. Most of the fusible manufacturers make the 1/4" rolls; I've bought Wonder Under and Steam-a-Seam Lite at Joann's and Fabricland.

  6. #6
    Senior Member sandrab64's Avatar
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    I only do machine binding. I cut binding 2 1/4 and sew on front with 3/8 seam. Run a tiny line of glue in the back stitch line, fold over binding so it just goes over the stitch line about an 1/8 inch or less and iron to set the glue. Then its just a matter of SITD from the front to catch the back.
    Sandra B

  7. #7
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    I have used the Martelli tool for bindings and their stitch in the ditch foot when sewing both sides of the binding by machine and once I learned the technique, I found that it works pretty well. But even so mine is still never as neat looking as if I sew the back down by hand.

    Susan Cleveland has a neat way of doing a piped binding completely by machine. It's different than the flange binding, but looks similar. I've done her method once and really liked the way it came out, but it takes some very careful sewing to get it right. She teaches the technique in one of her Craftsy classes.

    Rob
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  8. #8
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    I can't help you, Watson. I can't figure out how to do it either. I learned the hard way a long time ago that it takes me longer to do it by machine than by hand, especially when the stitches have to be frogged! So, I do mine by hand.

  9. #9
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I think that's just the nature of that kind of binding. You could make your binding narrower (2") and get less of a lip, but you'd have to be extra careful to catch the back lip of the binding as you SID on the front.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer23 View Post
    I manage this adjusting how far from the edge I stitch when sewing the binding to the front.

    Sew 4-6", then fold binding around and see how much of a lip there will be. Sometimes I even stitch it to the back, using a long stitch, if I'm not sure.

    The lip is usually too wide, so I move the needle one click to the left (widening the seam allowance). Restitch that 4-6" chunk, then fold it over and check again.

    Keep doing this until I have it just where I like it. I aim for less than a millimetre of lip sticking out.

    Instead of pins or basting clips, I will often use strips of 1/4" wide double-sided fusible to attach the binding to the back. This way I can check the lip (approximately) as I iron it in place, and I know it won't shift as I sew it. Most of the fusible manufacturers make the 1/4" rolls; I've bought Wonder Under and Steam-a-Seam Lite at Joann's and Fabricland.
    This is what I do, too.

    I usually cut my binding strip about 2-7/8 inches wide because I like a wider binding. (I think it should be a bit wider if I am going to sew the second stitching by machine.)

    I chose that width because of the left-most needle setting on my machine!

    But there is always a little bit of testing before I go very far around the perimeter.

    I know of one person that sews her binding to the front, then wraps it to the back and glues the binding down - and then stitches in the ditch on the top to catch the back of the binding. I have not tried that yet, but it sounds feasible. Again - I would do a bit of testing to make sure I liked the look before going very far.

  11. #11
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    Watson, I hope someone else can help. I always have trouble with binding.
    The best thing that works for me is to machine sew the front and hand sew the back. Frustrating!

  12. #12
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    I use 3/8 inch seam with binding cut at 2.5 inches. Make some samples and mark the allowance on sample.

    If you use a 3/8 inch seam allowance, you have to stop at the corners 3/8 inch also. I stop at the 3/8 inch and then stitch off on an angle.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhonda K View Post
    I use 3/8 inch seam with binding cut at 2.5 inches. Make some samples and mark the allowance on sample.

    If you use a 3/8 inch seam allowance, you have to stop at the corners 3/8 inch also. I stop at the 3/8 inch and then stitch off on an angle.
    It took me a while to learn to ignore that "stop stitching 1/4 inch from the edge" instruction when it comes to bindings. Stop stitching the width of your seam allowance from the edge/end.

    That only applies when one is stitching 1/4 inch from the edge when applying binding.

  14. #14
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    I have the same problem I think I will check into some of these tips

    I did take a quilt class once and the teacher had an awesome tip and it work wonderfully. She had us sew to the front (I think - might not be remembering correctly) then when you flipped the quilt over she showed us how to "feel" where the binding was on the other side. That helped keep things even - and I did 2 quilts that way with her and I was sold on the technique - it really helped me alot.

    the only problem that she also uses fusible batting. I like the fusible batting, but it just adds expense. I think this method would probably work with 505 spray - or maybe a quilt that was long armed.

    since I am so tight wadded I maybe get 1 or 2 quilts long armed a year... and I can't get myself to spend the money on fusible batting. I use the elmers glue for basting and that leaves residue that I can feel so I can't feel my binding on the opposite side when I am sewing. Maybe some day I will win the lottery and money won't matter ha ha

  15. #15
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I cut my binding at 2-1/2" wide, fold in half, press, sew it on with 3/8" seam on the back. Turn over and stitch to the front. I check to make sure all of the front binding is sewn down. Get it ready to be laundered, then on to the next quilt. If I made competition or heirloom quilts I might worry about how the back of the binding looks, probably not. If I am pleased then whomever gets it will be pleased too.
    Another Phyllis
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  16. #16
    Super Member Cari-in-Oly's Avatar
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    I use 2 1/4" binding too but I put it on differently. I stitch it to the back of the quilt first with about a 3/8" seam. Then flip it over to the front and sew it with an adjustable zipper foot. I hold 2-3" inches in place, with the edge just a hair over the seam line and sew the few inches, stop and place the next few inches, sew, etc. It tends to go fast when you get going, I'm always finished sooner than I thought I'd be. and I don't have all that extra binding outside of the seam.

    Cari

  17. #17
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I also struggled with this. I finally tried the faux flanged binding, and that's just about all I use. Yes, there's an extra prep step, but attaching it goes so quick it makes up for it.
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  18. #18
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston1954 View Post
    I only did one very small wall hanging that way and it was tough. I went back to the regular way after that.
    the same for me as well
    Nancy in western NY
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  19. #19
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I don't often bind with machine, but when I do I have better luck sewing to back first and then rolling to front and pinning and catching the very edge of binding in the needle. And one quilt I did I used the Faux flange method--two strips (I always have to YouTube this to get the widths) and then you sew in the ditch between the two from the front--works pretty darn slick!

  20. #20
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
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    I found that if I cut my binding strips 2 1/4” wide instead of 2 1/2”, I have less lip leftover. When I sew it from the front stitching in the ditch, I am usually also right on the folded edge on the back.
    I just want to spend the rest of my life laughing.

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    I’m certain this isn’t the “right” way, but I actually prefer to sew it to the back first, then roll it over to the front and stitch it that way. Easier, and I like the look better. I use 2 1/2” binding.

  22. #22
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    I have never figured this out either! I will have to make some sample runs to figure out what looks best. Meanwhile, I'll keep sewing on the front, and flipping to the back and hand sewing it. I actually really enjoy the hand sewing part.

  23. #23
    Super Member copycat's Avatar
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    I have done binding this way and have had the same issue. There were many good tips from the Quilt Board on the post I did on binding below that may help you. When you square the quilt, leave extra batting to make the binding fuller so when you turn the binding to the back it just covers the stitch line from attaching the front binding. I also use wonder clips to hold the binding. They have the marks on the clips that help you see that the binding stays the same width around the quilt as you attach it. (read post below to clarify)

    https://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f...s-t289641.html

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by VitaLuna View Post
    I’m certain this isn’t the “right” way, but I actually prefer to sew it to the back first, then roll it over to the front and stitch it that way. Easier, and I like the look better. I use 2 1/2” binding.
    This is what I do, too, but I leave a little less than 1/4" of batting showing beyond the quilt top. That insures a nice, puffy binding. If I find it's too thick at the corners, I trim a bit. I use a walking foot for both sides.

  25. #25
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    I just use a serpentine stitch. catches enough of the back edge to keep it down and if it's not perfectly straight it doesn't show. I've seen other decorative stitches used too. Looks like part of the design and a great use for pretty threads

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