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Thread: When Binding by machine....

  1. #51
    Senior Member luvstoquilt301's Avatar
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    Dec 2009
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    I have not read all the posts to see if this has already been suggested. I cut my bindings 2 1/2. I sew it to the BACK first. Then pull it around to the front. I stitch it down with a serpentine stitch. You can use a zig zag if you do not have this stitch. I have one part just about hit the fabric on the left. If it wavers a little that is no problem. You have to be ok seeing this stitch on the back partly on the binding and party of the backing.

  2. #52
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2013
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    South of Chicago, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by meyert View Post
    I have the same problem I think I will check into some of these tips

    I did take a quilt class once and the teacher had an awesome tip and it work wonderfully. She had us sew to the front (I think - might not be remembering correctly) then when you flipped the quilt over she showed us how to "feel" where the binding was on the other side. That helped keep things even - and I did 2 quilts that way with her and I was sold on the technique - it really helped me alot.

    the only problem that she also uses fusible batting. I like the fusible batting, but it just adds expense. I think this method would probably work with 505 spray - or maybe a quilt that was long armed.

    since I am so tight wadded I maybe get 1 or 2 quilts long armed a year... and I can't get myself to spend the money on fusible batting. I use the elmers glue for basting and that leaves residue that I can feel so I can't feel my binding on the opposite side when I am sewing. Maybe some day I will win the lottery and money won't matter ha ha
    I have bought fusible batting at Connecting Threads in queen size for around $17.00 when they have their sales. It is Heirloom 80/20 batting fused on both sides. I have found it to work very well. It does shrink some and give a bit of crinkly look after it is laundered.
    Life is a remarkable journey~~make yours memorable...

  3. #53
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
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    6,936
    Are you putting both front and back side of binding on with stitching once and catching both sides? I tried that once and had horrible results!

    Instead, I machine sew the binding to the back of the quilt, then fold the binding over to the front and stitch it as down as close to the folded edge of the binding as I can. It doesn't come out too bad. While I won't win any prizes for my binding technique, the job does get done.

    I tried hand sewing the binding once - it took forever, I stink at hand sewing, and my hands simply don't like to do fine work anymore.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  4. #54
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    South of Chicago, IL
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    300
    Quote Originally Posted by meyert View Post
    I have the same problem I think I will check into some of these tips

    I did take a quilt class once and the teacher had an awesome tip and it work wonderfully. She had us sew to the front (I think - might not be remembering correctly) then when you flipped the quilt over she showed us how to "feel" where the binding was on the other side. That helped keep things even - and I did 2 quilts that way with her and I was sold on the technique - it really helped me alot.

    the only problem that she also uses fusible batting. I like the fusible batting, but it just adds expense. I think this method would probably work with 505 spray - or maybe a quilt that was long armed.

    since I am so tight wadded I maybe get 1 or 2 quilts long armed a year... and I can't get myself to spend the money on fusible batting. I use the elmers glue for basting and that leaves residue that I can feel so I can't feel my binding on the opposite side when I am sewing. Maybe some day I will win the lottery and money won't matter ha ha
    Connecting Threads have sales frequently and will have queen size for around $17.00, fused on both sides. It is heirloom, 80/20. I have purchased it several times and love that I don't have to worry about pinning. It doesn't take any longer to sandwich than with pinning.

    Sorry for the second post. I didn't see the first posted when I sent it.
    Last edited by dee1245; 08-09-2018 at 09:38 PM.
    Life is a remarkable journey~~make yours memorable...

  5. #55
    Senior Member himnherr's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    Springfield, MO
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    635
    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I cut my binding at 2-1/2" wide, fold in half, press, sew it on with 3/8" seam on the back. Turn over and stitch to the front. I check to make sure all of the front binding is sewn down. Get it ready to be laundered, then on to the next quilt. If I made competition or heirloom quilts I might worry about how the back of the binding looks, probably not. If I am pleased then whomever gets it will be pleased too.
    This is what I do, too, only I use 2 1/4 wide binding. Im fine with how the back looks. :-)

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