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Thread: When you say chemo quilt...

  1. #26
    Senior Member quilticing's Avatar
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    Wow, good idea. On mine I'd do fleece or Minkee

  2. #27
    Senior Member quilticing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilticing View Post
    Wow, good idea. On mine I'd do fleece or Minkee
    in reference to the dragons.

  3. #28
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    Your questions about what it is seem to have been answered.

    Consider making a photo quilt or at least some of the blocks with photos of family, friends (including the furry kind if
    she has special pets.

    This is a tutorial for printing pictures on fabric. http://www.instructables.com/id/Inkj...bric/?ALLSTEPS


    Quote Originally Posted by beckyboo1 View Post
    does that mean just a quilt you give someone while they go through chemo....or do you use a certain pattern or do things a certain way? My sister in law will be going through chemo and I'm thinking about something for her.

  4. #29
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    I have had cancer twice and had chemo both times. I would not want a quilt that reminded me of my cancer. I already have a constant reminder and that would compound it. Soft, cuddly and over quilted. Big enough to cover me from neck to toe as they keep the rooms cool to cold. Often you fall asleep while getting the IV's as it kind of sedates you so a quilt is great. I was actually making other quilts while I sat there for all those hours so they kept me warm. These are real thoughtful gifts for the patients.

  5. #30
    Junior Member Mollie'sMom's Avatar
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    I can hardly see to type this. This thread saddens me so. I just found out Sunday that my best friend from childhood has just found out out she has stage four lung cancer and it is inoperable. I don't think she has much time. I have started to make a windows quilt for her. In those windows I am putting pics of little girls and those things we have done together all our lives. Playing as small children thru being in each others wedding's and since then. We are 72 years old. She is a dear sweet person and has always been the life of the party. I am going to miss her. I hope I can get this quilt to her very soon.

  6. #31
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Mollie'sMom ... I'm sad for you too! I hope that in those windows that you are including some "real" pics of the two of you and your life story together ... and not just fabrics symbolic of how your lives have been intertwined.

    Just remember, tears are good for both of you, and help with the acceptance of what's to come. Bless you for doing such a thoughtful gift for your friend. Be sure to continue to share some special times together and not just live with the memories!!


    HavPlenty
    ... Each person faces the reality of what "is" in different ways. In my earlier comments, I tried to emphasize it was JIMHO, the way I wanted to be treated if/when, although I was also trying to represent those who felt the same, and were not part of the discussion. I felt I was going into dangerous territory with my first comment, though it seems there are several others here that are of like minds.

    Too, I said my comments were with no disrespect for others of the opposite thinkings. It's important we remember we may all face challenges in different ways. I did suggest to be sure to take into account the recipient's wishes, mindset, etc. and yes, if they want the symbolisms by all means do it!

    I too know many who have been ambassadors before, during and after treatments, doing so for various reasons. I also know some that were more like me and were not interested in the symbolic representations ... and later became ambassadors, etc. Not to worry, they are good friends, and I have not rejected them.

    No, I have not been inflicted, though I have walked the journey side-by-side with many. And shared in the many different emotions and thoughts on this issue. So I somewhat have been there.

    We each need to remember that we are all unique individuals, with our own individual ideas and ideals. Thank goodness!!!

    We each need to ensure that those who are suffering with any diseases and the treatments, that it is all done, handled, managed in "their" way and not the way we ourselves think it should be!! Let us not lose sight of that!
    Last edited by QuiltE; 07-18-2012 at 04:52 AM.
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  7. #32
    Super Member Havplenty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mollie'sMom View Post
    I can hardly see to type this. This thread saddens me so. I just found out Sunday that my best friend from childhood has just found out out she has stage four lung cancer and it is inoperable. I don't think she has much time. I have started to make a windows quilt for her. In those windows I am putting pics of little girls and those things we have done together all our lives. Playing as small children thru being in each others wedding's and since then. We are 72 years old. She is a dear sweet person and has always been the life of the party. I am going to miss her. I hope I can get this quilt to her very soon.
    mollie's mom my father and his wife both had end stage cancers and i was caregiver to both. his wife had lung cancer and because she refused to give up though her prognosis was in 6 months, she lived approximately 15 months past what time she was given and didn't have treatments until the last 6 months of her life. she lived her life in the time she had. my father's cancer came back 3 times, each after some treatment. he too pressed on and l decided to make the most of the time he had. so i spent our time talking, taking walks and i took him on a bahamian cruise so that we could watch the sunsets together. though he was very sick when we went on the cruise, he just getting out of the hospital after a 2 month stay, he enjoyed the cruise and the walks along the florida beach we took. he told me thank you very much for doing this for him. you see i could do nothing about him leaving me but i could make the most of the time we had.

    i know it is a difficult time you are going through but whatever you feel your friend is feeling 100 times more. i kept this at the front of my mind every time i thought to stop and feel sorry for the situations my dad, his wife and my emotions were in and it kept me pressing forward for them. my sil was diagnosed 2 months ago with stage iv ovarian cancer with mestastasis to other vital organs. her prognosis is well.... not very good, dire even. but if you talked with her and my db brother right now you would not hear that from them. they have decided to look forward and her doc is encouraging them along with our family. you cannot help but do so because while they know what they are facing (they have 3 young children), they have refused to give up without a fight. so the rest of us fight with them.

    i encourage you to press forward with your best friend. there will be plenty of moments that she will feel the weight of what she is going through so you may need to be a wind beneath her wings. enjoy the time you have with her, perhaps watch sunrises or sunsets, enjoy some of her favorite activities, have long talks and long walks, go to chemo sessions with her. while you may not be able to do anything about her possibly leaving, there may be plenty you can do now to celebrate your long friendship together. i know is may be difficult but think about it along with the quilt you are making her. i have been on both sides of this and when i went through my time, my family and friends rallied around me so tightly, i know their love and prayers and deeds paved a smooth road for me to travel. i could not have imagined walking it without them.
    Last edited by Havplenty; 07-18-2012 at 06:44 AM.
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  8. #33
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    My 33 year old cousin was diagnosed with breast cancer in April. I asked her if she wanted a quilt, and when she said yes, I had her select the fabric and pattern for her quilt. She wanted bright and cheerful. I live in Texas and she is in Kansas City, so all of the selecting of fabric and pattern was done online. I sent her pictures of quilts I had made, and she liked one of the patterns. Then she told me blue and yellow with daisies. I found appropriate fabric and took pictures of it before I bought it. It worked out quite well. She has a quilt I know she likes, and I got to make her a quilt!

    I saw no reason for the quilt to be a surprise. If you don't either, this might work for you.

    Dina

  9. #34
    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
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    My husband has PINKED me nearly to death!! I do however wear purple and the ReLay for Life symbol. I understand that pink is for women and women get breast cancer, but guys get it too. Don't stone me ladies, but breast cancer gets most of the focus while lesser known cancers get none. I AM WOMAN! I AM a Rainbow of colors not just pink!

  10. #35
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    It is just a lap quilt intended for someone as they go through chemo. It does not need a particular pattern, color or fabric. I was part of a group making a bunch of blankees for those getting dialysis - these were crocheted and 45x60 was ideal. I would think a lap quilt of similar dimension would be perfect. Some prefer longer blankees, but it's pretty much a special request item. The two I donated are used only if the standard size blankee just isn't warm enough for someone. The rooms are kept cold for a couple of reasons - reduced bacteria growth, heat from the machines.

    BTW, I do not make 'pink' quilts (or afghans). My Dad's cousin went through breast cancer treatment and chemo and was pinked to death. So, I feel free to use anything, but I try to have the final result be soothing rather than frenetic.

  11. #36
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    I've gone to chemo with several friends and it seems like there is a point where the meds take over and they just want to close their eyes and rest. That's when the chemo quilts come out. I've learned through trial and error that lap size is nice and instead of a backing and batting, I use a flannel sheet. It can be single layer or double layer. It is soft and comfy and there is no air space to deal with - it just molds to the body. I, too, like to avoid the pink ribbons. Instead I use a pattern that has appliqued butterflies on it -- a symbol of hope.

  12. #37
    Senior Member qwkslver's Avatar
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    I just got diagnosed with cancer. I wouldn't want one with anything that reminded me of cancer. No ribbons, just something soft and comforting. Just my thoughts.

  13. #38
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by qwkslver View Post
    I just got diagnosed with cancer. I wouldn't want one with anything that reminded me of cancer. No ribbons, just something soft and comforting. Just my thoughts.
    ^^^passes QWkSilver a great big thick and cuddly but lightweight minkee quilt with lots of doggies (re your sigggie) in your favourite breed. All bedecked in your favourite colour(s)^^^

    {{{{{HUGS}}}}}

    So sorry about your sad news, QwkSilver ... I wish you an easy go with the treatments and that you send that beast running from your body.
    Last edited by QuiltE; 07-19-2012 at 04:13 AM.
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  14. #39
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I think it's just a quilt that you think the person would like to keep them warm during chemo. Lap size, maybe a little longer to cover completely. Maybe a matching bag to bring it with them.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  15. #40
    Super Member Edie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noveltyjunkie View Post
    I would do whatever would comfort her most. Some go for the cancer ribbon motif but that would just make me think more about the illness- personal thing.
    I totally agree - I have made chemo quilts and I have also made Cancer quilts for raffles for the Susan G. Komen three day walk - Absolutely nothing reminding any one of any illness. Why am I so adamant about this? My husband has gone through Leukemia and Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and I know he wouldn't want anything reminding him of what he is going through (was). Now he sleeps under a "Floating Star" Quilt made by Moi!!!!!!

    Another thing, if you are or anyone is going to make cancer/chemo quilts for Infusion Departments (where they have chemo), check first with the department. I wanted to make some for the people where my husband had chemo and they said no because after each use they have to be washed. And that many washes are not conducive to a quilt. Same goes for Children's Hospitals (make one to take home) - but check to see if they allow the quilts. You also have to be super careful on the quilting or tying down - nothing to get in the way of the tubes, needles, clamps getting in the way.

    I much prefer to give them as a "get out of the hospital" gift. Edie
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  16. #41
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    When a loved one faces a huge medical challenge, to make them a small, personal quilt is a great gesture. It's a lasting hug and a reminder just how special they are to you. How they chose to use it, be it at home for comfort, or to take along to treatments leave to their own option. It's important that whatever you chose for fabric and color, you just keep in mind what the recipient would love. Later, they can look at the quilt, still enjoy it and remember the comfort it gave them through tough times, but not necessarily represent the "disease". Just my opinion.

  17. #42
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    I make quilts for the kemo patients at my oncologist office. I was fortunate enough not to need kemo, but feel for the people there hooked up to the machine. I make different types and patterns, but always "happy" quilts. They tell me that when they give one of my quilts to their patients, it makes them very happy. Usually they are lap size.

  18. #43
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    I am fighting Melanoma... and so far, have been cleared as far as not having to haver chemo. That being said, I would prefer something warm and cuddly, and cheery. I know what I am fighting, and would rather ignore it when I am snuggling under it.

  19. #44
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    I so agree!

  20. #45
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    I make mine depending on the person it is for. If they have a special interest or love a certain color, I go for that. If they are involved in such things as relay for life, etc. I might go for the ribbons and like that. I make it a little bigger than a regular throw, to be sure it doesn't leave them exposed to the cold room.
    I use fleece for the backing to make it extra snuggly.
    For a nice touch, I sometimes make an extra block and make a bag for them to carry the quilt in, too. Just a simple one, but it's a nice touch.
    Linda Wedge White

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  21. #46
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
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    QuiltE, I agree 100%. When I was in Chemo, my favorite cover was a fleece fringe, long lap blanket that had multiple light colors on a brown background. I actually made it myself as none of my friends or family are crafty. I still wag it around just like a kid with his nighty night. :>) But as mentioned earlier, it all depends on the person and so just make something that she would feel warm and comfy with.
    jean

  22. #47
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    Now that I am almost 2 years cancer free, I am more ok with the ribbons. At first I didn't want anything to do with them either! Like I needed another reminder. I think everyone is different when it comes to the "pink" My goal this year is to make quilts for my local chemo place. Just to give back a little! My thoughts and prayers to the ladies who are dealing with cancer right now.
    Live simply, love generously, care deeply, speak kindly

  23. #48
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    Yes definitely something warm and comfy, maybe with flannel or minky backing ... it is quite chilly in those chemo rooms, partially cuz of the chemo being administered. Maybe in her fave colors. I also am not fond of the pink ribbons. I didn't have breast cancer but I find the ribbons to be a constant reminder and not a pleasant one, even tho it is supposed to represent being a survivor.
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  24. #49
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    I definitely wouldn't do anything that would make the recipient more conscious of her illness. I'd do something bright and cheery. I make mine a little bigger than most, about 60 x 72, because I know how good it feels to be "wrapped in love."

  25. #50
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
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    I have made a couple and I used pre-shrunk flannel for the backing. It was soft & cozy.
    Alma
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