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Thread: Who taught you to sew?

  1. #126
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Well, that's a tough one. My Grandmother's both sewed & quilted but they died when I was 7. But they did pique my interest. Then my Mother sewed but I could never learn from her (she was something of a perfectionist with a short span of patience & when I fumbled, I got "Oj, just give it to me" -- don;t get me wrong... I ADORED my Mother but that was one area that didn't go so good... tho we quilted together lots when I learned to do that). My tried in 4 years (!) of Home Ec were horrible. I always picked a pattern that was way over my skill level & it just led to tears. So everyone was SHOCKED when I took a quilting class at a local junior college. And it was there I had the teacher who got me hooked, Mrs. Barry. She was strict, she wanted you to listen up, but she was oh-so- patient & full of all kinds of good stories (she brought in old quilts & taught his history in addition to straight up sewing) & more knowledge than I knew a head could hold. But I like to think I'm still learning... from books, magazines, online, TV shows & really from here on the board.
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  2. #127
    Senior Member canuckninepatch's Avatar
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    My mom was an excellent seamstress so all three of us sisters learned to sew (and now we all quilt). My mom was the ultimate sewing police so we learned to do things right or not at all. :-)

  3. #128
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    My maternal grandmother started me out on her old Singer treadle. It now holds a place of honor in my house. I am still (50 years later) working on getting the hang of stopping and starting when I should. When I was about 9, my mother got a Necchi-Elna with cams that made many decorative stitches and I thought I was in heaven. My mother sewed so well and made all of my prom formals and even my wedding dress. I always had the best dressed Barbies in the neighborhood! They also taught me what every girl should know--how to crochet, knit, embroider, etc. How I wish they could see how I embroider now--on my Janome 10001!

  4. #129
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandyl View Post
    I learned to sew in Home Ec class. Too bad they don't have Home Ec any more in schools. That was such a great class, also learned to cook and bake in Home Ec. My mother knew how to sew and did sew alot; but it stressed her out to the max. Perfection seeking. I love sewing.
    I also learned to sew (garments) in Home Ec. Since I have been quilting, I have had to unlearn a lot of what I learned in Home Ec. There are much easier and better ways to do a lot of things than the ways I was taught in Home Ec. Of course that was a "few" years ago and methods and tools have improved a lot since then.

  5. #130
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    When I was a freshman in high school, I took Home Ec because there was no other choice except study hall. Surprisingly, Home Ec soon became my favorite course as I learned to sew. Soon I was making clothes for everyone in my family. I majored in Home Ec in college. I still love sewing and am now teaching my granddaughter and some of her friends to sew. A friend called me the other night and asked if I would teach her to sew when she returns from a trip to Europe. It is wonderful to be able to share sewing with others. I am so thankful to have had a great Home Ec teacher who did an outstanding job of teaching me to sew.

  6. #131
    Senior Member emlee51's Avatar
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    My paternal grandmother taught me (and my 2 brothers) how to knit, embroider and crochet as we were motherless at a young age. However, I was taught to sew in Home Ec. I never really got beyond mending, and did make a skirt for my daughter which was a disaster. Fast forward to 8 yrs ago when I was talked into joining a guild, and everything snowballed from there. Read a lot, sewed a lot, ripped a lot, and was given some very good advice from fellow quilters. I'm still in the learning process, and loving every minute of it!

  7. #132
    Member WA Vet's Avatar
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    My mom taught me and my two sisters how to sew. When we were growing up my mom made all of our clothes. When each of us turned eleven years old, she began teaching us how. I am self-taught with machine embroidery, machine quilting, upholstery and boat canvas. I have also tried my hand at repairing some of my older machines and have thus far been successful. I have no fear when it comes to anything sewing related.

  8. #133
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    My Mother taught me to sew and I am ever so grateful.

  9. #134
    Senior Member Christine27's Avatar
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    My mom was a 4-H sewing superstar and a home ec teacher. Sewing and really any craft but knitting was her thing. I didn't stick with 4-H but I did learn to sew my own clothes.

  10. #135
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    I learned the basics in Home Ec. Then progressed further with my mother and grandmother. I agree that it is a shame that Home Ec is no longer taught in schools. Great class for both girls and boys.

  11. #136
    Junior Member seazteddy's Avatar
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    I taught myself, my home ec teacher was not much, I didnt sew for about 20 years then I wanted something and couldnt find it in the store, so I bought a pattern and material and made it myself. It was alot easier to do than I remembered in jr high.

  12. #137
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    My mother taught me how to sew and all the other sciences of becoming a wife and mother. Whenever I tried to learn something from my father like changing the oil in a car orchanging a tire, he would always send me back into the house to learn the joys of housework and cooking. I took home ec. and made an apron. I won a prize for embrodery in girl scouts when I was seven. I think it's such a shame that most girls today are not taught the basics of life like they did in the old days. I tried to teach my girls but they wanted me to show them how to measure, slice and dice and put it all together but then they wanted to watch TV and let me watch the stove. Then they would tell eeryone that they cooked it all by themselves. Right.

  13. #138
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edbdbird View Post
    My mother taught me how to sew and all the other sciences of becoming a wife and mother. Whenever I tried to learn something from my father like changing the oil in a car orchanging a tire, he would always send me back into the house to learn the joys of housework and cooking. I took home ec. and made an apron. I won a prize for embrodery in girl scouts when I was seven. I think it's such a shame that most girls today are not taught the basics of life like they did in the old days. I tried to teach my girls but they wanted me to show them how to measure, slice and dice and put it all together but then they wanted to watch TV and let me watch the stove. Then they would tell eeryone that they cooked it all by themselves. Right.
    My son used to tell me I am a gourmet cook because I only cook with ingredients none of his friends families cooked from anything but a box.
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  14. #139
    Super Member nygal's Avatar
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    When I was a child I would sit at the kitchen table and lean on my elbows and watch my sweet Mother sewing. Years later after I got married I bought my first sewing machine. It was a Singer and it worked great for me for over 20 yrs. He was in the Air Force so we moved often and I did not have my Mother around then to really "teach" me how to sew. So I am pretty much self taught.
    When it seems like the world is falling to pieces remember that the pieces are falling into place. We are nearing closer to the End Times.

  15. #140
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    I wonder how my mom learned to sew and I cannot ask her because she died four years ago. I learned because I said, "I want to sew."

    Mom said, "There is the sewing machine. Have at it. Don't run your finger under the needle!" That was over 40 years ago and I still haven't ran my finger under the needle. I would yell and ask mom something (she was in the other room) and she would yell back. She had bought a pattern to make 18" doll dresses. It was too small for her to work with. I started practicing with that and her scraps. I bet I made that dress 20 or 30 times.

    I have often heard that my grandmother had to start making all her own clothes at age seven because she complained too much about what her mother made. Mammaw was NOT good at teaching anyone anything. It was easier to do it herself. Mom let us do anything but you had to figure it out on your own. I have been sewing on a machine since I was 7 or 8.

    All these stories about home ec make me laugh. The only thing I ever learned in home ec was how to measure brown sugar. I had never seen it before.

  16. #141
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    I taught myself. Mom didn't sew, as her mother was a home ec teacher and so demanding that it totally turned her off! LOL! But I was fascinated with fabrics and "creating". So I went to Penney's, bought a pattern and some fabric. Didn't have a clue what to do with it. (I was 10 years old!) So I spread the pattern out over the fabric, cut it out, and sewed the pattern to the fabric. When I was done, I tore the pattern off. Hey, it worked!! LOL!!!! I've been in love ever since. Thankfully I've learned quite a bit since then :-)

  17. #142
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    I first learned to sew in Home Ec. in Jr. High, but took another class at a department store when I was in high school.
    Mom had an old Domestic sewing machine that I used. My sister had learned to sew already, but I never got any pointers from her because she was grown and married by the time I took the dept. store class.

    The one thing I do that most people don't is sew without using pins unless I'm having to match seams. To me, using pins seems like a waste of time, plus I don't have to worry about pricking myself while sewing.

  18. #143
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
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    My mom won a sewing machine with a beautiful red and white houndstooth wool suit. Her sister Lydia sewed designer clothes in Chicago and later came home to take care of their mother and sewed piece work in what we called the shirt factory. I can remember her counting up her tickets to calculate what she would be paid. My mom's good machine was a Pfaff which we were not allowed to touch. Lydia's good machine was an Elna. My sister and I had a singer treadle, which is in my sewing room now. Never was allowed to take Home Ec in high school--my dad insisted on physics, chemistry, trig, and calculus.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it difficult to plan the day.

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  19. #144
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    I remember in elementary school in home ec, I made an apron. In high school home ec, before we could sew fabric on the machine, we would have to take plain paper and practice sewing on it without thread. In addition, my mom was a great seamstress and she taught me to sew also. She told me when she was a young woman, she would go downtown to the stores and look in the windows and sketch a dress that she liked and go home and make a pattern for it and sew it up. I was so amazed that she could do that. I have been sewing since about 12 years old and have always loved it. I don't make garments anymore, mostly into quilting now. I also do crochet, embroidery and tatting.

  20. #145
    Super Member quiltjoey's Avatar
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    When did I become interested in quilting? My Mom didn't sew very good but did the best she could. She made me skirts out of flour sacks when I was young and by Jr. high, they embaressed me. She did teach me to embroider, which I still love to do, especially, stump work and things like hardanger, etc. Mom had little time or patience to teach me much except house keeping. My aunt, Louise, taught me iron who paid me to iron my uncle's starched-stiff shirts and all their other clothes. When I entered high school, Home Ec was a requirement. We had treadle machines, mostly, with a few electric ones. I liked using the treadles best. We had to make a skirt with a zipper and set on waist band. My teacher was so strict and everything had to be perfect. My Mom picked the fabric which was ugly; and therefore, it was an ugly skirt no matter how good the sewing was! But I learned to do blind-stitch hemming, which is now great for bindings! Our passing assignment was a dress. It had a set on collar, set in sleeves, hand-made button-holes with a placket down the front, and box pleats! Again, Mom picked the material (fabric) which was cotton and bright, lemon colored. I hated it, but did a great job and got an A on the dress. Over the years, I have made a few things for myself and for my children but when I began working, I decided I would not wear "home-made" clothes again! I have tried recently to make a few things for myself but again, I rather go to the Mall. In 1968, I was 24 years old with a 1 yr. old son and a 4 year old daughter, my husband, who was in the Air Force was stationed in Germany. We lived there for 3years. One day in the BX I found a package of Mountain Mist batting which had a Rose Trellis printed on the inside of the label. I wanted to do the quilt but without a mentor or anyone to help me, I did what I could. I cut the templates out of cardboard, used and old sheet for the 16" squares and found some material to make the Rose Trellis pattern. Of course, I didn't have a sewing machine, so I began appliqueing the 18 blocks. Life got in the way. I packed it away all those years ( I am now 69) and found it about 2-3 years ago. Presently, I am working on it and have 5 more blocks to hand-sew the eight leaves on the rose pattern blocks. I plan on finishing it. So in 1968, is when I became interested in quilting and picked it up about 4 years ago. I have much to learn. The board has taught me a great deal and mostly about not having to have everything perfect. Perfection has always gotten in my way but have learned to let go of that now. I did used Connecting Threads tute to learn paper piecing which I enjoy very much... (Sorry to be so verbose but it is a story which started a long, long time ago...)

  21. #146
    Senior Member booklady's Avatar
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    Started sewing in 4-H with Mrs. Perschbaker when I was 9yo. But I have a pillow top of squares I sewed on my Grandma's treadle when I stayed there on snow days. Walked into my first Home Ec class in High School and told the teacher (a nun) that I didn't want another a-line skirt, I was making a wide wale corduroy coat with a fake fur lining! She said ok after I told her my experience level. Won 2nd place at a Fashion show with the coat!

  22. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltjoey View Post
    When did I become interested in quilting? My Mom didn't sew very good but did the best she could. She made me skirts out of flour sacks when I was young and by Jr. high, they embaressed me. She did teach me to embroider, which I still love to do, especially, stump work and things like hardanger, etc. Mom had little time or patience to teach me much except house keeping. My aunt, Louise, taught me iron who paid me to iron my uncle's starched-stiff shirts and all their other clothes. When I entered high school, Home Ec was a requirement. We had treadle machines, mostly, with a few electric ones. I liked using the treadles best. We had to make a skirt with a zipper and set on waist band. My teacher was so strict and everything had to be perfect. My Mom picked the fabric which was ugly; and therefore, it was an ugly skirt no matter how good the sewing was! But I learned to do blind-stitch hemming, which is now great for bindings! Our passing assignment was a dress. It had a set on collar, set in sleeves, hand-made button-holes with a placket down the front, and box pleats! Again, Mom picked the material (fabric) which was cotton and bright, lemon colored. I hated it, but did a great job and got an A on the dress. Over the years, I have made a few things for myself and for my children but when I began working, I decided I would not wear "home-made" clothes again! I have tried recently to make a few things for myself but again, I rather go to the Mall. In 1968, I was 24 years old with a 1 yr. old son and a 4 year old daughter, my husband, who was in the Air Force was stationed in Germany. We lived there for 3years. One day in the BX I found a package of Mountain Mist batting which had a Rose Trellis printed on the inside of the label. I wanted to do the quilt but without a mentor or anyone to help me, I did what I could. I cut the templates out of cardboard, used and old sheet for the 16" squares and found some material to make the Rose Trellis pattern. Of course, I didn't have a sewing machine, so I began appliqueing the 18 blocks. Life got in the way. I packed it away all those years ( I am now 69) and found it about 2-3 years ago. Presently, I am working on it and have 5 more blocks to hand-sew the eight leaves on the rose pattern blocks. I plan on finishing it. So in 1968, is when I became interested in quilting and picked it up about 4 years ago. I have much to learn. The board has taught me a great deal and mostly about not having to have everything perfect. Perfection has always gotten in my way but have learned to let go of that now. I did used Connecting Threads tute to learn paper piecing which I enjoy very much... (Sorry to be so verbose but it is a story which started a long, long time ago...)
    I loved your story, quiltjoey!

  23. #148
    Senior Member rrhaigh's Avatar
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    What a great story. Would love to see a picture of your applique with the rose trellis!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by quiltjoey View Post
    When did I become interested in quilting? My Mom didn't sew very good but did the best she could. She made me skirts out of flour sacks when I was young and by Jr. high, they embaressed me. She did teach me to embroider, which I still love to do, especially, stump work and things like hardanger, etc. Mom had little time or patience to teach me much except house keeping. My aunt, Louise, taught me iron who paid me to iron my uncle's starched-stiff shirts and all their other clothes. When I entered high school, Home Ec was a requirement. We had treadle machines, mostly, with a few electric ones. I liked using the treadles best. We had to make a skirt with a zipper and set on waist band. My teacher was so strict and everything had to be perfect. My Mom picked the fabric which was ugly; and therefore, it was an ugly skirt no matter how good the sewing was! But I learned to do blind-stitch hemming, which is now great for bindings! Our passing assignment was a dress. It had a set on collar, set in sleeves, hand-made button-holes with a placket down the front, and box pleats! Again, Mom picked the material (fabric) which was cotton and bright, lemon colored. I hated it, but did a great job and got an A on the dress. Over the years, I have made a few things for myself and for my children but when I began working, I decided I would not wear "home-made" clothes again! I have tried recently to make a few things for myself but again, I rather go to the Mall. In 1968, I was 24 years old with a 1 yr. old son and a 4 year old daughter, my husband, who was in the Air Force was stationed in Germany. We lived there for 3years. One day in the BX I found a package of Mountain Mist batting which had a Rose Trellis printed on the inside of the label. I wanted to do the quilt but without a mentor or anyone to help me, I did what I could. I cut the templates out of cardboard, used and old sheet for the 16" squares and found some material to make the Rose Trellis pattern. Of course, I didn't have a sewing machine, so I began appliqueing the 18 blocks. Life got in the way. I packed it away all those years ( I am now 69) and found it about 2-3 years ago. Presently, I am working on it and have 5 more blocks to hand-sew the eight leaves on the rose pattern blocks. I plan on finishing it. So in 1968, is when I became interested in quilting and picked it up about 4 years ago. I have much to learn. The board has taught me a great deal and mostly about not having to have everything perfect. Perfection has always gotten in my way but have learned to let go of that now. I did used Connecting Threads tute to learn paper piecing which I enjoy very much... (Sorry to be so verbose but it is a story which started a long, long time ago...)
    Robin
    robinsquiltingroom.blogspot.com
    Southern California

  24. #149
    Super Member quiltjoey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by denveremerson View Post
    I loved your story, quiltjoey!

    Thank you. Life was not always easy but then most peoples aren't. I have learned to love my life especially when I turned 18 and got married to the best man in the world... He and his family taught me what a loving family really is...

  25. #150
    Super Member quiltjoey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrhaigh View Post
    What a great story. Would love to see a picture of your applique with the rose trellis!!!
    I will try to post a picture of the block. Remember it is very elementary... Hope to get it posted in a day or two on this thread...

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