Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 151

Thread: Who taught you to sew?

  1. #76
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Somewhere
    Posts
    15,528
    Blog Entries
    2
    I learned at home. I sewed some of the dress I wore to first grade. I'm appalled at some of the Home Ec class stuff you all mention. I always wondered why they made us make aprons when nobody wore them? Or gathered skirts when they were so out of style? CREAMED ONIONS??? We made tuna biscuits - ick... Nobody eats that now do they? Why didn't they do something kids wanted to learn? Maybe they would still do Home Ec.
    Never let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  2. #77
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Posts
    7
    I had Home Economics in school and we made a pillow and baked cakes but that was the extent of it. I am mainly self taught although Home Economics started by journey for my loving of baking and sewing. The birth of my grandchildren pushed my love of sewing toward quilting. As for what is the best advice while sewing? Well I find that when I get tired I start making mistakes and the more I keep sewing the more mistakes I make so my rule of thumb is. If you make a mistake you must be tired. Stop and correct the mistake. If you make another mistake take it out, correct it and now it is time to stop sewing and start fresh tomorrow. Two mistakes in a row signals to me that it is time to stop. If you don't correct the mistake it just gets bigger and bigger. Just like in life right. So that is my advice. Correct your mistakes in sewing as you would correct your mistakes in life. If not they will continue to happen or they will just get bigger and bigger.

  3. #78
    Junior Member Suzan88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greenville, Maine
    Posts
    168
    Blog Entries
    14
    My grandmother, my mother and a Home Economics teacher. At school we had to make an apron with perfect cross stitch embroidery - lots of taking out and redoing - a gathered skirt and baby doll PJs. I've never enjoyed making clothes because I've never been a stick insect and my sewing doesn't account for curves.


    Suzan
    (Maine)
    Choose to be happy

  4. #79
    Super Member MissM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,581
    Blog Entries
    1
    My mom taught me to sew when I was very young. I was also in 4H and I took Home Ec and had sewing classes there as well. I have sewn my own clothes, sewn for my home. However, the quilting that I did as a young girl was always done all by hand. Mom had a huge quilting frame she and the ladies nearby (rural area) always worked on quilts as time permitted. Stitches had to be perfect, no long or sideways stitches permitted. So I never did any quilting after I left home and not until I had my boys raised. I started quilting because I found it could be a stress reliever for me and I could allow myself to make mistakes.
    Friends are the most important ingredient in the recipe of life.

  5. #80
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    150
    Blog Entries
    2
    When young I joined 4 H..my mother taught me learn how to sew.. I actually won 2nd place at the State Fair for a blouse and a wrap a round reversible skirt..boy was that a very long time ago....didn't sew much after that till my daughter was young..made our clothes for church till she wanted ''store bought '' dresses...took another 35 years and started quilting last year..my only regret was not paying more attention. I sure miss mom telling me to rip out that seam and do it again, but learning to do that part really well now !!

  6. #81
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    594
    My mother taught me to sew....I am so thankful, out of 4 daughters I'm the only one that sews. I told her thank you very often and she was proud. When my mother passed away in January this year all of her sewing things became mine and I am just now starting to go thru it all. I, myself already have a ton of fabric but when I started going thru hers I became totally overwhelmed.

  7. #82
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Albion, Michigan
    Posts
    74
    Blog Entries
    1
    My mom made most of our clothes and I am sure she sat me at the sewing machine to sew some things. Home Ec in 7th grade was my first real lesson. When I started teaching, I bought a sewing machine and have used one ever since-and that was waaay back in 1973.

  8. #83
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Circleville, OH
    Posts
    87
    My mom taught me and my sister. She made all our clothes growing up. She also was a 4-H advisor and taught many girls. Bless her heart, if she had a girl in our club tha didn't have money for material, off to House of Fabrics she'd go and beg for large remnants or outright donations. Because she bought so much for us, they gladly did it for her and threw in zippers buttons, thread, etc.

    I also took Home Ec in school, but every project I did for that was a disaster. Mom was the best teacher. If I wanted something new for school, she'd say "You know where the material and patterns are - make it yourself." She'd help, but we did the major construction.

    She started quilting about 3 years before she passed and loved it. When she got quilts made for all her kids and grandkids, she started on each of her nieces and nephews on both sides. She got about 1/2 way done before she passed. Bless her heart, she was one of a kind and I miss her.

  9. #84
    Super Member Rumbols's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,519
    I started trying to make doll clothes when I was 6 by cutting a hole in the middle of a men's handkerchief (my dad's) and got the tar beat out of me. Then Mom showed me her sewing machine which she didn't use very much. Mom showed me the basics of how to work the machine and got very upset when I took part of it apart as it wasn't sewing right. But when I put it back together and the sewing machine worked better than it did before, Mom let me use the machine as long as she was around. Later I took home ec (cooking and sewing) in grade school all the way thru my senior year in high school. The high school teacher was a little woman and she was very strick with how she wanted you to sew and would hit our hands with a ruler if she saw you doing something wrong. Almost turned me off sewing. I made clothes for all my aunts and hardly ever made anything for myself until graduation.

  10. #85
    Super Member JENNR8R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Herndon, VA
    Posts
    1,576
    No one... I don't know how to sew. I started quilting by reading The Complete Idiots Guide to Quilting and Quilting for Dummies. I'd love to know how all of those interesting feet on my Bernina work.

  11. #86
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    1,375
    Oh I love this thread. So fun reading everyone's stories. My Mother taught me to sew as well, and also to crochet and knit. I honestly cannot remember the first time I used the sewing machine because it was so long ago...I mean, I literally started sewing as soon as I was tall enough that my foot could reach the peddle. I was always watching my Mom sew. Even when she didn't have a sewing room she'd set up at the kitchen table and I'd watch. So as soon as I could start sewing, my Mom had a pretty good fabric stash and would let me pick out fabric to make clothing. We'd go to Jo Ann's and she'd let me pick out 2-3 patterns when they'd go on sale for 99 cents. I remember making pants from this peacock feather print cotton fabric she had in her stash and I loved them! When I hit around 16 I started making those short skirts that Mom wouldn't let me buy. Lol* Even when I moved out and was on my own I'd go buy fabric to take to my Mom's and sew curtains and things for the house on Mom's sewing machine. I didn't discover quilting though unti I was about 24.
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  12. #87
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    489
    Many, Many moons ago I learned in a Home Making in high school...made an apron and a gathered skirt and never sewed much after that until I decided to take a quilting class at the college in the 70's. Now I seldom use my sewing machines for anything except quilting....they don't do mending!

  13. #88
    Senior Member suzanprincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rancho Cordova, CA
    Posts
    452
    Blog Entries
    1
    I must have learned the basics from my mother, because I know I made some doll clothes of sorts. Sixth grade Home Ec. set me on the sewing path. With fewer machines than students we often had to wait for a spot, but there was one treadle, which we were all required to use at least once; every one else disliked it, but I loved it and after the first week got to use it every class. We had to make a simple gathered skirt with a zipper for our first project, and because of the pretty border print mother and I found I loved that skirt for years. Eighth grade taught sewing again for a semester, and my graduation present that year was a new sewing machine! Mother sold her old Singer to a neighbor and bought a new White for me, though for both of us to use. Wish I had that Singer now! The White was a zig-zag, very useful, but never did a nice straight stitch like that Singer.
    The quilt bug buzzed around me during early high school, but never actually bit until a couple years ago. I did lots of garment sewing and I've saved all my fabric scraps all those years since cuz they might be good for a quilt, but now that I have a good use for scraps I'll be darned if I can find them! They have to be here somewhere, as I keep way too much"this might be good for something" stuff....
    All my Home Ec. teachers were at least good and some were excellent; the only bad instructions given were to a friend who decided--against the teacher's recommendation--to make a full circle skirt, when the teacher required a 3" hem in EVERY skirt or dress. That skirt was worn once, in our end of year fashion show, and then went straight to the trash; I tried to get my friend to shorten the skirt and put in a rolled hem, but by then she hated it too much after her hours of hand work and hideous results and dumped it!

  14. #89
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Traverse City, MI
    Posts
    62
    My mom sewed...in fact she taught "Bishop" sewing...made lingerie that would make Victoria's Secret blush....lol! There was no way in [email protected]@l I was going to give up the chance to go to the million stores in the mall and shop though....store owners were depending on me! I started cross stitching as a mom...and then we transferred to the middle of no where in Northern Michigan and "borrowed" my mom's sewing machine....my daughter will tell of the hundreds of dresses I made for her...and all the fittings...because I taught myself!Mom was pretty impressed that I must have been listening to something she said.

    I am a self taught quilter....never taken a class....but lots of tutes and books. I enjoy simple blocks...putting the colors together is my creative outlet...and right now...3 quilts to bind are staring me in the face, wondering when I will get to them.....

  15. #90
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina
    Posts
    11
    Wow,
    Interesting thread! I too learned to sew in home ec, with plenty of help from my Mom. The most interesting tip that I remember is to hold the needle and bobbin threads when you start sewing to avoid loops on the bobbin side. I've been surprised to see how many other tips there are for avoiding this problem that aren't quite as simple.
    Patty from the Beach

  16. #91
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,761
    Blog Entries
    1
    I wasn't actually "taught" to sew. My mother made all of our clothes, and anything needed for the house. I sat by the sewing machine and made clothes for my dolls out of the scraps. I started at 5. I just watched and learned from her. My job, as I got to be about 10, was to make the handmade buttonholes, sew on the buttons, and hem my own clothes after she had made them. That is why to this day, I extremely dislike handstitching anything.

  17. #92
    Junior Member totosmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bedford Co, PA
    Posts
    256
    Peepers, thank you so much for this fascinating thread!

    Like many others, it was Mom who taught me to sew on her black Singer in the bedroom in the late 1950s. I started with doll clothes (so teeny, tiny!) and then moved to clothes for myself. I even remember my dad making slip covers for our old daybed. Once out of college, I got a little sewing machine at an estate sale and started sewing again. Too busy with work, I stopped sewing for many years. Now that I'm retired though, I've taken up quilting. I bought a Singer 201 in memory or my mom and have managed to acquire a few other machines along the way.
    Dorothy in PA

  18. #93
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    3,134
    I watched my GreatGM sew on her treadle and she let me "pretend" to sew although I couldn't even reach the treadle. She and my GM lived side by side so I had both of them teaching me to sew. They gave me small pieces of material to sew together that went into the quilts-nothing fancy most of the time. In FL during my high school years, Home Ec was a required subject for everyone so more sewing-the A line skirt-yikes and a bag. I had two Home Ec teachers during HS so I had two different approaches and my GS leader also promoted sewing. By my senior year in HS, I made my mama a purple double knit jumpsuit with zipper- her fave color and she was tall and thin to pull off those jumpsuits. It was my last gift to her and she loved that thing. I am so grateful to my GGM and GM for teaching me to sew as it has served me well over the years making clothes, halloween costumes, repairing a sail on a sailboat, home dec projects, and now mostly quilting.

  19. #94
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    7,261
    Blog Entries
    1
    Home Ec in junior high. We made an apron. ICK! Then my parents thought I should cook dinner since they both worked. This started when I was 12. So they "paid" me $4.00 a week to cook for 6 nights.(Back then, folks were paid $1.00 an hour and there weren't laws guiding minimum wage, which wouldn't have applied, anyway.) Then they got the idea that I should buy my own clothes. HA! So I bought a pattern, fabric (didn't cost at all what it does now) and started making my own clothes. To be fair, they did continue to buy my underwear, shoes, and winter coat. Once I was on my own, I rarely sewed clothing for myself. Today I sew for pleasure. Much better!
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  20. #95
    Senior Member JaniceP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    483
    My mom taught me to sew on an old treadle and I made doll clothes, I don't remember how old I was when I started sewing probably around 6 or 7, but when I was in high school I was sewing dresses for the ladies at church and doing some sewing for the teachers at school. I took 4 years of Home Economics and loved it. By the time I was a Senior I was asked to be teachers helper in home Ec. I loved to make crafts and things for the house, pillows, curtains and such, but although I had always wanted to make quilts....never dove in until this year. I love the piecing, now trying to learn free motion quilting. I remember my home ec teacher watching me and having me help all the other girls who was having problems, she instilled in me confidence in my sewing.
    Always in Stitches,

    So blessed in the opportunity of life, the gifts of nature, and the choice to do good to others. I'm thankful for this day.
    http://www.photographicendeavors.com

  21. #96
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arnold, MD
    Posts
    7
    One of my paternal aunts taught me to hand sew doll clothes when I was five. I spent many summer hours immersed in this activity when I was a young child. By the time I was in high school, I was making all of my own clothes . Two of my granddaughters have shown a strong interest in making doll clothes and quilts. At the ages of 4 and 6, I am making an effort to involve them in the process. They love to be involved in fabric choices and to hand me quilt pieces as I assemble quilts.

  22. #97
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crosby,Texas
    Posts
    838
    Myself mostly. Oddly enough I had to take Home Ec. (half sewing, half cooking) and HATED the sewing, A line skirt, when finished I was going to throw away. My older sister wanted it so I gave it to her telling her never to wear it in my sight LOL. Since I cooked already for the family the cooking part was a breeze. When I got interested in quilting my sister couldn't believe it. Books and magazines and studying how they went together. I also taught myself how to embroider. and did that growing up. My grandfather (Dads Dad) was a tailor but I never met him. Maybe there is something about being in the blood LOL

  23. #98
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    League City, Texas
    Posts
    506
    I took Home Ec. in school and made an apron. My mom made all my clothes and was a hugh influnce on me, she helped me alot. She always told me to be patient and do a good job. I always had a love for quilts and about 15 years ago took my first quilt class at Quilts by the Bay in Galveston. Loved every minute of it and have been learning and loving it ever since. The hardest part for me is the patience part.
    Texas raised, Texas Proud

  24. #99
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Buckeye AZ
    Posts
    1,251
    I spent a lot of time with my grandma when I was a girl. I loved helping her lay out a pattern at the kitchen table and watch her cut it out. Later when I took home ec in Jr. High I fought against the teacher's sewing rules...things like pin the pattern every 3 inches. Grandma just used butter knives to weight it down! Every Thursday morning Grandma took me with her to her Mary and Martha's group at church to sew missionary projects and have a potluck lunch. The older women, the Dorcas group, always had a quilt on a big frame, and they taught me to hand quilt. My great grandma taught me smocking, cross stitch and embroidery while we sat and watched soap operas after lunch. In junior high I started making all my own clothes, and Grandma always checked to see if all my seams were finished neatly. When I sew on her old Morse machine, I always feel close to her. Great memories and a legacy of skills which I treasure.

  25. #100
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lowell, MA
    Posts
    14,087
    My Mom was instrumental in teaching me to sew. She taught me to make aprons (without a pattern) and as I got older - taught me to make skirts - again without a pattern. There weren't many patterns available when she made clothes for my older brothers and my sister. I can't remember a time that she not not teach me whenever I asked her how to do something. My second mentor was my high school Home Ec. teacher who also had loads of patience. I can still vividly remember the time I put in a zipper and sewed it into the side seam. After patiently "unsewing" the zipper from the skirt, she spent over one hour teaching me the "correct"way to put in a zipper. I never had a problem putting a zipper into a garment after that lesson. She was always encouraging me to sew and I've made my own clothes as well as clothes for my kids for many, many years. I just wish she had seen those garments and then the many, many quilts I have made. All this because a home ec. teacher and my Mothef taught me the joy of sewing.

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.