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Thread: Why Sew At Angle

  1. #26
    Super Member LeslieSkelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nana pat
    what is an endless seam?
    Here are a couple of web sites:
    http://resources.quiltwoman.com/hint...essBinding.pdf

    http://www.chestercountyquilting.com...s/Binding.html

  2. #27
    Super Member KathyAire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeslieSkelly
    I like to cut it at an angle. I don't like the bulk. I also like to do the endless seams on the binding. So I have no bulk all the way around the quilt.
    What do you mean by 'endless seams'?

  3. #28
    Super Member KathyAire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathyAire
    Quote Originally Posted by LeslieSkelly
    I like to cut it at an angle. I don't like the bulk. I also like to do the endless seams on the binding. So I have no bulk all the way around the quilt.
    What do you mean by 'endless seams'?
    Never mind. I didn't read far enough before asking the questions. I will go to the links provided.
    Thanks.

  4. #29
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeslieSkelly
    I like to cut it at an angle. I don't like the bulk. I also like to do the endless seams on the binding. So I have no bulk all the way around the quilt.
    Me too, you can never tell where the binding began or ended on my quilts. I think it looks so much nicer.

    I do mine on the angle for bulk and because I like the look of a diagonal seam vs. a straight seam. Since I press that seam open, it will be stronger when done on the angle than straight.

  5. #30
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    I can see how the angle would make it stonger...

    I enjoy these discussions to read both sides and to know why others came to do what they do and why... it's like research.

    We won't argue, PatriceJ. :wink:

  6. #31
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I don't see this as an argument. Can't we discuss things anymore? I've not seen any nastiness on this thread that deserves a smack-down....


    I've never done an angle seam, but thanks for the links. I may try it next time to see which I prefer. Honestly, I've never thought to try it as my straight seam worked fine and to me looked good.

  7. #32
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    ahem. that's why i said "sorry" and that "argue" was too strong a word. i already fussed at myself - in public.

    i also gave myself 50 laps around the gym. that's gonna be a looooooong walk. ;-)

  8. #33
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Ha!ha!

  9. #34
    SuzanneTx's Avatar
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    I was taught to sew at an angle but it makes more sense to my brain to do straight. I do both.

    Suzanne

  10. #35
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    I've been thinking about the "why" I sew straight seams, and I remembered: I learned to quilt by sitting in the asile of a large, now closed, fabric shop, reading books I couldn't afford then. I'd memorize what I could, then head home to practice. The book I first read gave both options, and the straight seam one was easier to remember :lol:

  11. #36
    Super Member CoriAmD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by annette1952
    I prefer on the angle for the obvious reasons above but I also like the looks of it. Just me.
    ditto, and it does help "hide" the seams much better when done on an angle. they just seem to fade away, but I have found when I did do one on the straight, the seams "jumped" out too much. It just looked amaturish (JMHO) :)

  12. #37
    Super Member Fiber Artist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    oh, yes. let's argue now about angled or straight seams to join binding strips. i've been soooooo bored. :roll:

    "argue" is too strong a word. my very sincere apologies.

    it just floors me sometimes the way we pass on the opinions of "experts" as though they were absolute and unquestionable. after all, the only reason they get to call themselves experts is that we have agreed to also call them experts. :lol:

    our technique, fabric, tool and supply choices should be based on the results of our own experiments. no one thing works for everybody. not even Elvis. :lol:

    i started sewing mine at an angle just to prove to myself i could do it and keep the strips straight. i kept doing it because i decided i preferred the way it looked.

    try it each way and then do what you prefer. unless you enter it into a contest who cares what others think? even then i wouldn't actually care. i'd just do "whatever" to satisfy the judges.
    Agree

  13. #38
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I thought the angled seam was for bias so you always had the seam on the straight grain of the fabric. My home ec teacher explained it that way back when...

    So if I'm doing a straight grain of the fabric binding I do a straight seam, and if I'm doing a bias binding I do an angled seam.

  14. #39
    ReRe's Avatar
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    I have gotten a lot of wonderful answers on here about both ways of sewing. I think from now on I'll angle when I can and straight when I can't. Thank you all for taking time to respond.

  15. #40
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    thank you, I thought an Endless Seam was something different than that. I just didnt know.

  16. #41
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IrishNY
    Guess I'm a beginner who has been quilting for 20 years then, cause I always cut it straight. Just my preference. :?
    I agree. Most of the time it is too much of a pain in the behind to remember which way to lay the fabric for the angles. I always had at least one that didn't have the right side going the same way. I have done both ways, but mostly just go straight across.

    I never notice any bulk and I don't enter quilt shows either. Family and friends could care less if it is an angle or not.

    If I could figure out a trick to remember which way to lay the angles I might do it more often just for something different.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom-6
    I thought the angled seam was for bias so you always had the seam on the straight grain of the fabric. My home ec teacher explained it that way back when...

    So if I'm doing a straight grain of the fabric binding I do a straight seam, and if I'm doing a bias binding I do an angled seam.
    I think the question refers to how the seam goes/appears on the finished piece.

    If one is doing angled joins:

    If the binding fabric is cut on the "straight of grain" - then the "joining seam" ends would be cut on the bias (45 degree angle)

    If the binding fabric is cut on a 45 degree angle, the "joining seam" ends would be cut on the straight of grain.

    I don't know if the actual seam is "stronger" - but it does spread it out over a longer length - and it definitely makes the joined area less bulky and chunky looking.

    But if one is down to the last little bit of fabric - one does what one has to do.

    Attached is a drawing to try to illustrate what I mean. Pretend the blue lines of the graph paper are the way that the threads are woven.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #43
    Senior Member cizzors's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Quote Originally Posted by IrishNY
    Guess I'm a beginner who has been quilting for 20 years then, cause I always cut it straight. Just my preference. :?
    Ditto.

    :thumbup: And I don't notice any bulk.

    Ditto the dotto.

  19. #44
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    When we have to join pieces to make the binding, regardless of the method, there will be 4 layers of fabric at the joint. When we choose to sew them straight across, all of these layers 4 on the front side of the quilt AND 4 on the back side of the quilt will fall on the same spot and will be bulkier than the diagonal joint. When we choose to sew them on the bias, there will still be the same number of fabric layers, but the joint on the front of the quilt will be offset from the joint on the back. It is now my preferred method.

  20. #45
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    not only does it reduce the bulk but it gives a smoother binding, and is stronger...if you stitch your strips straight across they can easily pull apart and your binding could come undone with any stress or normal wear.

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