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Thread: Would like Feedback on Wool

  1. #1

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    I recentely purchased at a Estate Sale a large quanity of fabric. In this large stash are several good size pieces of wool, in various colors, all warm colors. Really beautiful fabrics, and as I'm going through it, I could'nt but help to think what a really warm quilt this would make, But the only idea I could come up with was a Crazy quilt. But surley there are ideas to use this beautiful fabric on, or at least another way to use it. Would anyone be willing to share their ideas, or experience? I would really appreciate your feedback and ideas. Thanks

  2. #2
    quiltmaker101's Avatar
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    There have been quite a few projects for wool in recent issues of McCalls and American Patchwork and Quilting mags. They may have some on their websites.

    I know a lot of people use wool instead of batting for winter quilts.

    Not me! I am allergic to the stuff.

    Good luck Rebecca!

  3. #3

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    If you use wool as your batting, How dose that effect the over all quilt when you wash it?

  4. #4
    refibered's Avatar
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    I *love* working with wool. It's soft, warm, and has some amazingly beautiful
    colors.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rebecca Chambley
    If you use wool as your batting, How dose that effect the over all quilt when you wash it?
    It will shrink. You could check online shops for wool batting, and see what they suggest/recommend for washing instructions.

    Please let me know if you don't use all the wool. I'd definitely be interested in buying some.

    Oh, there's also "felting" wool -- I don't know exactly how, but my friend does this and makes fabulous purses. There are lots of option working with wool!

    rf

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I have seen many wall hangings and other items made with wool that do not get washed/or as often as quilts tend to get washed. Grama had wool quilts that were wool tops and backing with no batting, they were very warm.
    To felt the wool, you wash it in the washer and dryer to shrink or "felt" it. Then you can use it for whatever project that you have in mind.

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i think (but don't know for absolutely sure) some of the newer wools are washable. it would say so on the end of the bolt. in a case like yours, rebecca, i would assume it isn't.

    you cannot "make it washable" if it isn't. all you can do is throw that sucker into the washer, then the dryer, and use it in the resulting state. it will shrink like a sunufagun, but only the first time.

    test a 6 - 8" square of each one to see what happens.

    OR make the quilts but plan to have them dry cleaned.

  7. #7
    Super Member SaraSewing's Avatar
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    My mother made me a "Tumbling Blocks" Quilt from wool a gazillon years ago. It has flannel on the back. It has been used and used and used and showing no signs of wear. It has washed numerous times also. My sister makes a wool quilt for each of the neices and nephews that get married and they turn into favorites. She has used almost every pattern possible, and her advice is to use a pattern that doesn't have lots of seams intersecting at one place, i.e. don't use a star. My quilt is a really big one, and I just can express how wonderful it is. Even my wonderful husband doesn't like wool (scratchy), but he loves this fluffy warm quilt also because of the flannel on the back. Sara

  8. #8

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    Thanks everyone for your input. I will cut a 8x10'' piece of each and wash, to see what happens. The idea from Sara I believe about the quilt with a flannel back, sounds so cozy. if you can make the wool into wool felt, is it the same as felt, In regards to working with it. Patrice Thanks so much for the swatch test idea. Thanks Ladys for your time and imput.

  9. #9
    Norah's Avatar
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    Becky, if you wash on gentle cycle and air dry, then fluff in dryer on air dry, that works best for the wool quilts I have washed. They are wonderfully warm, when nothing else will do.
    Another use is to make rugs by either hooking or crocheting out of wool strips from the fabric. I, also would be interested if you decide to sell some of it. It is getting harder to find wool in the thrift shops.

  10. #10

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    How big would the strips need to be, for either hooking or crocheting? I know how to do both. How much would you like to have? No I would'nt sell it to ya, but I would share it with ya. You always been so kind in helping me with things, and I'm one that never forgets a kindness. I'll send ya an e-mail in a day or two on the colors I have. Thanks for your time and imput.

  11. #11
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    It's actually the agitation in the washing that shrinks the wool. If you just soak and spin out, you shouldn't have a problem. A front loading washer will also minimize the problem, because it doesn't agitate.

    What a treasure!! I read a really neat article in an Australian quilting magazine a while ago that featured wool utility quilts called Waggas (I think).

    From Patchwork Planet:

    A unique Australian tradition is the wagga (pronounced wogga). Typifiying the Australian need to 'make do' with whatever was available, waggas were made of whatever the housewife could find. They are heavyweight quilts made of woollen suiting samples, or salvaged squares of wool blanket. Often a wool blanket was used for batting. The haphazard nature of the wagga is a result of the quilter patching anything suitable together, and gives waggas a wonderful charm.
    http://inaminuteago.com/blog/index.php/archives/2006/04/18/does-anyone-have-a-clear-definition-of-a-wagga/ that is an interesting blog article about wagga quilts, too.

    I think you could do neat things with your wool! I envy you!

  12. #12

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    I went to that web site you sent me. Altho I could'nt read the small print, the picture of the one I seen, so reminded me of a crazy quilt. I love the name wagga, Gave me inspiration to maybe pursue with my first intial idea of a crazy quilt. Crazy quilts too started intialy out of necessity and what was left of this or that, In the 1800's is when the victorian era made them more out of silks, velvets and satin, and brocades, giving a new twist to quilting and showing off there beautiful hand work. I think I may see a wagga in my future. Thanks so much.

  13. #13
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    Did you ever make anything with your wool?

    I also am spinning wool on my spinning wheel. I met a lady this week and she is going to teach me to make the wool hook rugs.

    Karen "Craftybear"

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