Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 48 of 48

Thread: Design wall: batting, fleece or batting??

  1. #26
    Power Poster solstice3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida
    Posts
    10,516
    Wonder how hard it would be to use a sharpie and make grids? Are they necessary??

  2. #27
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bacliff, TX on Galveston Bay
    Posts
    1,168
    I have a white piece of fleece that we nailed to a piece of wood on the wall. It works so much better than flannel, to me.

  3. #28
    Senior Member ghquilter53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    843
    Our local quilt shop sells quilter's white flannel, 90 inches wide and it works perfectly over insulation board. I bought the cheapest insulation board at Menards.

  4. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    35
    I used headliner that's meant for the inside roof of your car. You can get it at Hancock's . It higher priced than felt but I think it works best. Hancocks have it on sale now and then

  5. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    984
    My design wall is flannel backed tablecloth screwed onto the wall with a strip of wood. Why use foamboad if you have wall spacce?

  6. #31
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,487
    Quote Originally Posted by chaskaquilter View Post
    I have a big flannel backed table cloth pinned to my wall with tacks. Holds beautifully and was only a few bucks. Tablecloth is sure ugly, but no one sees that.
    Same here!

    I do use pins once I've started stitching the blocks together in rows as they are too heavy to stay up then.
    legendarycandles.com
    Just discovered I qualify for FABLE (Fabric Acquired Beyond Life Expectancy)

  7. #32
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Colony, TX
    Posts
    3,364
    I used a cotton blend batting (80/20) I think it may have been warm and natural but can't remember. We have had it up for 3-1/2 years and if it gets looking bad (too many threads) just roll a lint roller over it. Not only do we use it (it is over at my mom's house) but her Senior group all comes over and uses it and I have a group that meets twice a month and they all use it. Can't comment on fleece or felt as I haven't tried it, but I think it works better than the flannel.

  8. #33
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    15,121
    Quote Originally Posted by solstice3 View Post
    Wonder how hard it would be to use a sharpie and make grids? Are they necessary??
    Not necessary ... but they can be helpful when laying out blocks to help keep all straight and square.

    I have loved my fuzzy wall (black polar fleece) right from the beginning and never thought of grids.
    At a course at a LQS they had design walls with the grids at 2" spacings in a pale blue on the white flannel ... it was pretty nice when we came to putting our OBW hexes on the wall.

    I still love my fuzzy wall and will not be changing it, but yes, every once in awhile I think oh how nice it'd be!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  9. #34
    Senior Member sunnymom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    667
    I bought a flannel sheet set on e-bay in white and in king size. It works really well for my design wall, I love it! They were only 29.00 on e-bay and they were Martha Stewart brand which was nice and thick When fuzzies are on the design wall I just take a lint roll to it and that works great as everything wants to stick to the flannel including my sheepdog's hair!

  10. #35
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,407
    My design wall is 2 4x8 insullation boards. I covered it with warm and natural -- it is still great after 10 years.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  11. #36
    Super Member JeanieG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Camarillo, CA
    Posts
    4,054
    Quote Originally Posted by paulswalia View Post
    I've successfully used craft felt from Joann's for many years now. It's wide so covers the whole 4 x 8 foot insulation board that I've used and cleans up easily when covered with threads by a tape roller being rolled over it. I worried this action might ruin the "stickiness" of the felt, but it doesn't.
    Yes, this is what I got on mine too. Works just great, and the price was very reasonable.

  12. #37
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Newark, Ohio
    Posts
    138
    A flannel backed vinyl tablecloth is great to use. Much less expensive than the Fons & Porter.

  13. #38
    Super Member Podunk Princess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    North Central Arkansas
    Posts
    1,516
    I purchased the design wall from Keepsake Quilting many years ago. It appears to be made out of a light-weight felt. I've even washed it and it still holds everything great.
    Miss Rita

  14. #39
    Senior Member RonieM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Stanley, NY
    Posts
    509
    I use batting, mostly because I purchase my batting by the bolt (20-30 yds at a time) and that is what I had a lot of on hand.

  15. #40
    Super Member JUNEC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Clearwater, FL
    Posts
    3,201
    Quote Originally Posted by d.rickman View Post
    We just purchased the "Disappearing Design Wall" from the internet. I fits over the closet doors and when you don't need it you can just leave on your pieces of fabric, and roll it up on the blind - it is like the flannel backed tablecloths that you see. The shelf that holds the design wall, has a shelf on top, so you can use it for various items. It is really nice, and the wooden shelf is made from a really light wood. You can get them any colors that you like.
    http://www.vanishingdesignwall.com/
    Wow what a great idea - thank you for sharing it with us

  16. #41
    Junior Member masufa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Oregon,USA
    Posts
    190
    I have sliding closet doors in my sewing room and I covered them with flannel just using duct on the back of the doors. I this because it doesn't take up any extra space in my room. I have had blocks on the wall for weeks at a time with no problem.

  17. #42
    Member bettyboop32953's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Merritt Island
    Posts
    38
    Blog Entries
    3
    I use an inexpensive flannel backed tablecloth tacked to the wall. A friend of my built a design wall with a foam insulation/acoustic board covered with car overhead liner fabric. Our local Hancock's carries a wide variety of colors. Since her sewing room is in the old dining room, her husband built a frame around it. She used a grey colored liner.
    Quilting is fine, but
    Finishing is divine.
    http://quiltinbee.blogspot.com/

  18. #43
    Senior Member Patricia Faye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lakehills Texas
    Posts
    310
    We have a Queen-size Murphy Bed (my husband built) in the guest room where I sew. I hang a rod across the bed's 2 decorative handles and attach a flannel backed table cloth (from Dollar Store) using binder clips. It is large enough for most of what I've made so far. I use a lint brush to clean it. If I can't get all the threads off, I throw it in the dryer for a couple of minutes and it does the job! I can always get a replacement tablecloth. Here are 2 picture (excuse the mess):
    Name:  DSC01011.JPG
Views: 369
Size:  1.22 MB Name:  DSC00603.JPG
Views: 361
Size:  1.60 MB

    We have added on to our house so I'm getting my own sewing room within the next few months! Yippee... I'm looking at getting the 2 pieces of insulation boards so I have a moveable design wall. Love reading everyone's suggestions.
    Patricia Faye

  19. #44
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Cottage Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,035
    I started out with old flannel sheets but later covered them with Warm and Natural cream batting. It works great!

  20. #45
    Super Member sak658's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    down Houston way...
    Posts
    1,536
    Blog Entries
    1
    I took some batting , cut to fit the back of my sewing room door, bought a 1-1/2 inch dowel rod and made a rod pocket at one end of the batting, put the dowel in the pocket and hung it over the door..the weight keeps it there..made a rod pocket at the bottom and put a 1 inch dowel rod in it, the weight keeps it hanging straight...had to measure the dowels to fit the door when its closed..works good for me...

  21. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Near Austin, Texas
    Posts
    20
    Blog Entries
    2
    I covered the insulation with a white flannel sheet I purchased from a garage sale....so far I love it, but haven't tried tacking an entire quilt to it, just the small individual pieces. Can't get much cheaper than that!...I think the entire sheet set was $2.00

  22. #47
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    norwich, ct
    Posts
    9
    I tacked a flannel-backed vinyl tablecloth (from local dollar store!) to my sewing room wall about a year ago, it works great and the vinyl seems to give it a little stability. Also, easy to pull down, move around, and could NOT be cheaper!

  23. #48
    Super Member MaryAnnMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    in front of this dang computer instead of my Bernina!(Naples, Florida)
    Posts
    1,661
    Wow, I'm surprised I'm still getting responses four months later! The wall is up and in use. I started with black felt, but found it wasn't sticky enugh. I've since replaced it with black batting (80/20) and it works great. I do sometimes add a few pins, especially for long strips. They tend to want to take off when the ceiling fan is on. )
    aka Chicken McLittle

    If it's true we learn from our mistakes, I'm going to be a genius!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.