Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Dust, Lint, how do you manage it?

  1. #1
    Junior Member brunswickgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cabin at the lake.. on my way to Brunswick as soon as the house is complete
    Posts
    144

    Dust, Lint, how do you manage it?

    I have 350 Sq Ft in my workshop. I run a small batch cut/sew production company and am finding the dust/lint is overwhelming. I clean, sweep, vacuum and mop almost daily but that is not enough.

    Is anyone using or have experience with air filtration systems?

    Thank you
    Linda K Stafford

    "Wag more - Bark less"

    Wine is the Answer.....What is the Question????

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Mendocino Coast, CA
    Posts
    1,702
    I don't have an answer for you on filtration systems...sorry. I know that the professional cutters in the apparel industry keep a vacuum system on their walls and clean up regularly...probably 8 or 9 times a day. At home, I've found that keeping a wet rag around to wipe up the dust as you go really helps. I'll be curious to see if anyone comes up with a filtering system.

    ~ C

  3. #3
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    35,122
    You might try the filters you can put in your floor vents to filter dust first. I dust my sewing room with windex on a cloth first and then vacuum.

  4. #4
    Super Member roguequilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    over here
    Posts
    1,076
    Quote Originally Posted by brunswickgirl View Post
    I have 350 Sq Ft in my workshop. I run a small batch cut/sew production company and am finding the dust/lint is overwhelming. I clean, sweep, vacuum and mop almost daily but that is not enough.

    Is anyone using or have experience with air filtration systems?

    Thank you
    i would do some research on a woodworking site. in my magazines there are ads for shop systems that do what you need.
    the rogue quilter - in from wandering in the sun and snow with camera in hand.

  5. #5
    Super Member sewNso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S C michigan
    Posts
    2,102
    Blog Entries
    1
    I keep a air cleaner running in my sewing room. and I have several in my house also. I got the tower ones, and the newer ones are black now, from Walmart. they are pricer now, I think over $100, now, but it sure cuts down on the dusting, and the layers in the sewing room.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Chula Vista CA
    Posts
    6,586
    For that amount you may need to seek professional help. You are breathing that too - so you need a good system.

  7. #7
    Junior Member brunswickgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cabin at the lake.. on my way to Brunswick as soon as the house is complete
    Posts
    144
    Thank you all for your suggestions. I will get busy doing some research and post what I find
    Linda K Stafford

    "Wag more - Bark less"

    Wine is the Answer.....What is the Question????

  8. #8
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St. Louis suburbs
    Posts
    6,085
    I would definitely buy some type of a good filtration system. DH suggested you go online and read the reviews (Best Buy, Lowe's, Home Depot) and pick the very best one. With the size of your room and the amount of dust that you are having, he suggests buying two. One suggestion I have is to find out if you can wash the filters. We have an cold air return that needs a filter and we found one that we can wash and put back in almost immediately. You have to think of all that dust that is going into your lungs. Please find something that works good and do it soon. Your health is worth it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jokir44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    694
    How often are you changing your furnace filters and is there a better one for your size? The more expensive ones do a better job. My DH tried a cheaper filter and I could tell it very quickly by how often I was dusting. He has gone back to buying the better filters and has always changed them every month.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Feather3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    577
    Quote Originally Posted by brunswickgirl View Post
    I have 350 Sq Ft in my workshop. I run a small batch cut/sew production company and am finding the dust/lint is overwhelming. I clean, sweep, vacuum and mop almost daily but that is not enough.

    Is anyone using or have experience with air filtration systems?

    Thank you
    I worked in a garment factory. We had huge filtration systems up high, near the ceiling. They had metal panels that were pulled out & rinsed off, when they got round to it. Thing is we breathed in fabric dust as it filtered from our machines up thru the air, before it got to the system. Once it's airborne you are breathing it in. These large units also cost a bundle.

    This article, on a wood working site, explains about "Dust Particle Size and and Respiratory Health" & different type of filtration systems. http://www.rockler.com/skill-builder...fine-wood-dust

    The best way would be to catch the dust before it gets airborne if possible.

    If your set up is small you could try a box fan with a furnace filter attached to it. I know some people, that have parrots, use this method to catch all the fine talc type parrot dust. They use the cut to fit blue or green filters. Turn the fan on & it will suck the filter to it.

    Another option is a company called "Gizmo Breeze". They make a filter for a "20" inch box fans that attach with magnets. They only fit 20 inch fans, that also have the knobs on top. http://www.gizmobreeze.com/home.html

    What ever system you choose it should be set up close to your cutting table, if that's where the most dust is made.

    Feather3

  11. #11
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central Willamette Valley, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    7,658
    Blog Entries
    1
    I live with two dogs, two cats, a big wild field next to me, a railroad track about 100 feet from my house, and the truck route through town on the other side of that. I got a REAL dust problem. I use a piece of cheap flimsy Pelion type material to place on the back of my little fan that catches o good amount of dust. I hand wash and dry them, and reuse them about three times. I just cut it in the shape of the fan back. When I am cutting fabric, I turn the fan away from me to pull the lint away from me. I still have to dust, but it does cut down on it.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    33,979
    I am lucky I don't have that amount of dust. I do run a window AC unit during the summer. I handle fabrics gently as to not create a lot of dust.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member mhollifiel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Edenton and Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    829
    Blog Entries
    4
    I know nothing about shop environments but I do know about vacuums and the rumbas we use are fantastic. They can be programmed to go out at certain times each day. They return themselves to their chargers as well. The only human work is emptying the dust cartridge and replacing the filters when needed. I now work in a practically dust, lint, thread free environment thanks to "Hal," my favorite sewing tool. Some models are pricey but I recommend making the investment in the very best one they have. It's so worth it.
    Holli
    Your Favorite (Retired) School Librarian

    Today I bent the truth to be kind, and I have no regret, For I am far surer of what is kind than I am of what is true.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.