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Thread: Moving Stash

  1. #26
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrandmaPeggy View Post
    We have moved many times. My recommendations are: 1. If you don't need/want it, then don't move it. Donate to the nearest charity. 2. Label, label, label. I know it takes time now, but it saves time on the other end of the move. You won't be sorry.

    Good luck on your move, make lots of new friends and enjoy your new community.
    I have moved many times, too and agree with GrandmaPeggy. :-) Good luck with the move.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  2. #27
    Junior Member beksclen's Avatar
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    No ideas but wanting to welcome you to TN. We came from MI just over 7 years ago and absolutely love living on the Plateau.
    Becky

  3. #28
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    When I had to move from VA to GA I decided I had things sorted the way I wanted and wasn't going to mess with it much. I already had my fabric on boards. Which out of everything I have tried is the best for me. I found or cut down boxes to fit the boards and packed that way I also took a photo printed it out on plain paper and taped it to the side of the box so I knew what was in it since I didn't know how long I would have before unpacking. I didn't have a whole house to pack just two rooms so it was easier for me. Books were packed in small boxes I could handle and a list taped to the outside of the box. I tried to label every box as to what was actually in it. Toward the end there were some things just put in wherever they would fit but all in all its been easy to unpack. I had already downsized while in VA Had to get rid of a lot of things I didn't want to but that's life.
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  4. #29
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    Been there, done that. when I decided to put my house on the market, I packed up all my stash in plastic totes, machines in their perspective packing boxes, etc. Never in my wildest imagination did I think it would take 3 years to sell the house. My entire sewing room was in a supposedly A/C storage unit for all that time. But it all came out okay. The plastic totes didn't survive as they put heavier items on top of them and the weight cracked either the container or the lid on most of them. I even found one of my embroider machines at the bottom of a very tall pile and shreked from horror. Since the machine was in its original box with the styrofoam forms around it, the machine came out okay. Sure makes you wonder what these professionals are thinking about when they load up their trucks though. Some of my furniture didn't come out as lucky though.

    Good luck on your move. I moved from Florida to Iowa. It was so good to see my sewing room again after all that time. I too put the sewing room off to the side till the rest of the house was unpacked. Hardest thing I ever did.......:-)
    Suz in Iowa
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  5. #30
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    In 44 years of marriage I've moved 18 times. In some of the early moves I had to totally dejunk and move the bare minimum. The most important thing I've learned is that more small boxes are way better than less big boxes! I also use my fabric, as well as towels, sheets, etc., as packing material. Yes, the boxes are a bit heavier than if I used paper or peanuts to pack, but on the other hand I don't have to pay for as much packing material then throw it away when I get to the new place. I do pack my fine china and crystal in foam and load it at the top of the truck. Using the fabric to pack clean dishes and such does not get it any dirtier than packing it alone in boxes, and helps keep the number of boxes/bins down.
    Shirley in Arizona

  6. #31
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    When we had to downsize from a 3 -bedroom home, with 2 sewing spaces, to a 2-bedroom apt. I had great difficulty paring down my stash. Thanks to a dear friend who "inherited" the majority of what I left behind, helping me decided what to keep, what to give away, knowing that if she couldn't use the fabric, that she would find someone else who could, like a mutual friend who makes "Caring Covers" for children who have been hospitalized and need some comfort. I "downsized" my stash by almost 50%, but then told my husband that I refused to give up any more fabric, especially when quilting is my "sanity", and we would be together 24/7. I tried to organize by fabric type, Christmas, children's, fall, etc., but in the end, the majority of it went into clear plastic bins. Besides adding some color, it's easier to see some of what I have with the clear totes. I'm so glad I kept what I did, as I haven't bought much fabric in the last 3 years, only "fill-ins" where I needed a background fabric or a fabric to finish a quilt, but mostly I quilt from my stash. I find it nice to go just a few feet to "shop" in my stash, not quite as much fun as a quilt shop, but it works for now. By the way, we are retired, so I need a hobby and have even made some money from my quilting and crafts.

  7. #32
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    We have been in Pittsburgh for 25 years and are really looking forward to moving home to TN. Our daughter lives in Knoxville and we will be building a house in Gray, TN near Johnson City. We are being ruthless in purging our house. We have decided not to take some of our furniture so we will either sell it or donate it here. All my lamps are really old so I will be getting rid of them too. They are not worth the extra care it takes to pack them. My craft room and kitchen are going to be the problem areas. My husband is a packrat when it comes to computer stuff so he's on his own with that stuff. I am packing now so hopefully by the first of December everything will be packed except minimal stuff we need everday. Moving makes you realize how much stuff you have.

  8. #33
    Super Member Difergie's Avatar
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    You will love Tennessee...lots of quilters here

  9. #34
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    We have lived in the same place for 44 years. We have no plans to move until leave permanently. I have moved from room to room several times. Think I'm about done with that also.
    I like the idea to pack all sewing items and fabrics in boxes and marking contents on all sides. You could just stick all boxes in the room where they will go. When you get the main things put away, then concentrate on the sewing things. I think that would work the best. I would not use my fabrics for packing. More logical to keep all together.
    I like dejunking before the move.
    Good luck and hope all goes well.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  10. #35
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    I have moved several times with my stash holding up pretty good. I labeled boxes with each type of craft: crochet, embroider, quilting. Since I like to make purses with heavier material, I labeled those boxes also. If you are in the middle of a project and know that you will want to start with that when you get settled, then put a big 1 on the box and label it your craft room. Each box should be labeled first with the name of the room you want the item to go into and then in smaller letters, you list what is in the box. Since I put towels and sheets around my lamp bases or other glass items, then I am sure to list that too: towels/lamps/sheets. I have moved into at least 19 houses since I was 18 years old. And that was a long time ago.

  11. #36
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
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    We moved from MN to NV a year and a half ago. We had a 4000 sf house and only had a 26 ft Penske truck to move it all in. I couldn't afford to waste an inch of space. I used my fabric as packing materials in places where I would have used bubble wrap or peanuts to fill void spaces in the boxes. All boxes were packed tightly so that there was no chance of them caving in or their contents moving. The only item that broke was an outdoor table leg which was not boxed and I think that was due to someone tugging on it. I do pre-wash my fabrics but I don't iron and starch until I am ready to use them. I mostly rolled the fabrics up for stuffing into the boxes so I found unpacking to be very easy. The fabric was clean when exiting the boxes. Even though I used a bunch of stash for packing, I still had over 27 boxes of just fabric. I will use my fabric again for moving since I found it to be economical and an environmentally friendly packing material.

  12. #37
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    I had to move and downsize as well. I bought totes at Walmart. Just don't make the totes too large because fabric is really really heavy when the tote is full. I organized mine into colours and labeled them well. The other quilting items I used packing boxes. I really advise that you label your boxes well. Tell yourself what's inside. It really will make your life much easier. This is my 3 rd move in 7 yrs. I hate moving but I am getting good at it!

  13. #38
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    While the fabric used for packing material will be heavier you are cutting down on boxes. One box full of fabric weighs a lot and takes up space. You might look at FlyLady. I used her packing hint for a notebook and numbered boxes. We moved in July and things went crazy. DH has been in the hospital 3 times since. My notebook has been a lifesaver.

  14. #39
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    tartan gave you my idea. I've moved often and use my fabric as packing material...never a breakage.
    Kate

  15. #40
    Super Member CookyIN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Think of your stash as environment friendly packing peanuts. It won't hurt it to wrap all your breakables and you can iron it if necessary later. A few ideas are fat quarters between your plates, bigger pieces wrapping picture frames, packed around your machines in their cases......
    Brilliant!

  16. #41
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    The last time I moved I packed everything in Rubbermaid totes and it worked out great...Easy to pack, move and unpack. Congrats on your retirement and move. I was born and raised in Waynesburg Pa. and lived in Chattanooga Tn. for 5 years....

  17. #42
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    So glad to read the ideas here. Two more years for us and we'll be downsizing and moving, too.

  18. #43
    Senior Member Prissnboot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Think of your stash as environment friendly packing peanuts. It won't hurt it to wrap all your breakables and you can iron it if necessary later. A few ideas are fat quarters between your plates, bigger pieces wrapping picture frames, packed around your machines in their cases......
    I just did this exact thing! I'm a great believer in using what you have instead of buying something else. I used fabric for cushioning and clothing for stuffing holes in boxes here and there. Unpacking is going to be a bear, but I figure I have the rest of my life to unpack (besides working a full time job still), so a little chaos isn't that big of a deal - it WILL end! Take it from me - your stash makes great packing material!!!!!
    She looks for wool and flax And works with her hands in delight.

  19. #44
    Senior Member luvstoquilt301's Avatar
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    We moved from the East Coast to AZ last December. We decided to eliminate half our belongings...not counting quilting stuff...lol. My DH drinks Sam Adams Beer and buys it in the 24 boxes. We had saved them for a long time because they are so nice and sturdy.

    I ruler fold my fabric and was able to pack it into these boxes right off the shelf. We had movers and using the same size boxes allows them to pack things VERY efficiently. All beer boxes went into my sewing room.

    I did go through all my fabric and give quite a bit to a guild friend for charity projects. My room is very small and we rent a house. DH put in shelves in the closet and it all is in there now.

    I did buy a few boxes from Wal Mart for other things. They have nice ones for very little money.

    If we did not LOVE something it did not come with us. I miss nothing I gave away.

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