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Thread: Thread organization!

  1. #1
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    Thread organization!

    How do you organize your thread? If you have multiple machines, domestic, embroidery, mid/longarm, do you use only one type thread for each machine (I'm sure) but what about cottons, polyesters, weights, plies. ANd can someone out there remind me what the "T" on the label means; i.e. "T12", or "T3", etc. I use mostly Coats and Clark All purpose and have for years with no problem. Just ran across a Ziploc gallon bag of polyester. I have thread organizer containers just a lot of thread to organize.

  2. #2
    Super Member patsan's Avatar
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    I bought a plastic craft boxes from amazon that holds thread nicely. Connecting threads also sells them.
    Pat
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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i put mine on pegboard behind my machine... it is out of direct sunlight. i've done it that way for years and have not found any damaged thread there.
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak T.H.I.N.K.
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  4. #4
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    Do you separate the different blends like cotton from polyester or machine quilting from hand quilting, etc.

  5. #5
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    I have thread stashed everywhere!

    At the machine, are the spools that have been started.
    Left drawer has polyesters. Right drawer has cottons.
    Bobbins are held onto the matching thread, with a bobbin buddy/stick.

    Away from the machine is my stash of new spools, again separate drawers according to type of thread.

    I have several of the fancier embroidery type threads that I use for FMQing or straight-line quilting. Because they are not used regularly, the started ones are kept at the front of the drawer and the others behind a divider.

    Over the years I have had different ways of storing my threads.
    This is what is working well for me now.

    There is no "right" way, as a lot depends on what space you have available for thread storage ... and how much thread you keep in your stash!
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    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    Most of mine are in plastic boxes that have dividers. The bobbins for each color are with them. If you like these and see them in Walmart, the fishing department has the same thing for less than the sewing section. Ask me how I know.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  7. #7
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
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    I have some of mine on 3 thread racks on the walls behind the machines. Two of the racks are for serger thread (plus a divided box) and one for smaller spools of machine thread. I have all my Sulky rayons, metallics, sliver, etc in thread boxes with some miscellaneous decorative threads. These at stacked against the wall under the window. I used to help out at the Sulky booth at Quilt Festival with set up and tear down and Fred would let us take our wages in merchandise so I have lots of thread boxes and threads from them.
    Patrice S

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    Anyone know what the "T" stands for on some labels. I can't for the life of me remember.

  9. #9
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    the tread for each machine is in a drawer at that machines sewing table. Then there's drawers of different sizes (cone vs spool), the LA thread, different brands, specialty threads (metallic), 12 wt thread. All in drawers.

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    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
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    I only use cotton thread, it is in drawers in a parts storage unit. I also keep a selection in a to-go container for sew days. We just finished a two-day in-house retreat at our local extension office.
    Aurora

    "A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness. Bad manners. Lack of consideration for others in minor matters. A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot." -Robert A. Heinlein

  11. #11
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    Anyone know what the "T" stands for on some labels. I can't for the life of me remember.
    I just looked at mine and most don't have the T, but I know I've seen it. Just researched it and cannot find a bit of information. Will try again.

    (later) I can't seem to find anything on what the T means. Sorry.
    Last edited by Boston1954; 07-29-2017 at 11:04 AM.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    (still later) I used several different wordings, and nothing. Then I just put T 12 and every site I went into mentioned SILK as part of the description.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  13. #13
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    Anyone know what the "T" stands for on some labels. I can't for the life of me remember.
    Perhaps show us a photo of the labels/spools that have it.
    More likely someone will recognize it with that.

    Plus you didn't mention what brand(s) of thread you see this on.
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  14. #14
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    I just found 5 spools Jim had bought me a few years back. They all say T 56 and hand quilting. I've read that if it says hand quilting on the label, that it cannot be used on the machine.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

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    Yes, I believe that is true.

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    I don't know what the T stands for, sorry.

    My thread all fits on one wooden thread rack. I have just a few poly spools and put them all on the left side, farthest from my machine. Machine quilting thread is all I have otherwise, as I don't have any specialty machines. I use those rubber "Peels" around each bobbin that has thread on it, and I use matching "huggers" for the spools. I stack the spool on top of the bobbin if the thread colors match.

    My discipline is to not buy thread unless I have room for it on that ONE rack.

  17. #17
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I try to keep my threads near the machine I use it the most but have found I'm using my embroidery thread on my quilt machine from time to time too. I have my on pegboards with those old-fashioned 36 x 36 towels over them till I can come up with a better plan to keep the dust off them. Had to add yet another pegboard when Connecting Threads changed the height of their threads as they no longer fit into my rolling cart. I use the commercial hooks so I can put the bobbin under the spool so they don't get lost for my quilt machine. Don't have a pic of the serger threads on the other side of the room but you get the idea.
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  18. #18
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Decorative Threads that I use in art quilts are sorted as follows: Vintage and antique cotton thread is kept together in three vintage thread boxes sorted by color. Vintage cotton wrapped poly and nylon are kept in another set of vintage thread boxes also sorted by color. Vintage and modern silk, rayon and trilobal poly and metallics have their own boxes and Various specialty threads are in a couple of other boxes sorted by material and whether they are able to go through a needle or must be used for bobbin work or handwork only (think Razzledazzle and other lumpy shiny threads).

    Thread that I'm certain is strong enough for everyday using quilts is stored in another box that includes thread for piecing as well as quilting--- these are strong modern threads such as aurifil, isacord, wonderfil, and some of superior's threads. I keep a limited range of colors in these threads so they are all stored together in one tin.

    If there is thread left over on the bobbin when I'm done then the bobbin gets stored with the thread spool- depending on spool type and what kind of storage box I'm using they either get put in the little bobbin cubbies in the vintage thread boxes, or attached to the spool/ cone with Hugo's amazing tape.


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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    Anyone know what the "T" stands for on some labels. I can't for the life of me remember.
    I believe the T stands for Trilobal. Trilobal means 3 ply.

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    http://fashion-incubatorcom.r.worlds...6/f-i-logo.png Found the "T" meaning on some of the spools of thread.

  21. #21
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tessagin View Post
    http://fashion-incubatorcom.r.worlds...6/f-i-logo.png Found the "T" meaning on some of the spools of thread.
    TessaGin .... your link only takes us to a logo/graphic.
    Perhaps you could give us a link to the info you mentioned?
    Thank you!
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  22. #22
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    This is what I store my smaller spools of thread in, have 3 of them. http://tinyurl.com/y8ef42xk


  23. #23
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have my cotton threads on two spool holders, same wall as window, no sunlight at all. The others are in a box in cabinet or in school supply boxes.
    Another Phyllis
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  24. #24
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    Most of my thread is on the wall on those peg things. I keep my quilting thread downstairs in a wooden box because I only use it for hand quilting.
    But I know that's another project I need to dive into. My sewing room is horrendous at the moment.

  25. #25
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    Tex system is based on the weight in grams of a thread 1 kilometer long. A kilometer of tex 10 (very fine) thread weighs 10 grams, while a kilometer of tex 100 (very coarse) weighs 100 grams. The Tex system measures the entire thread, no matter how many strands or plies it has. While a thread can have any actual weight, the Tex system has official ranges of sizes that get the same Tex number. For example, all threads weighing between 24.0 and 26.9 grams per kilometer are designated T-24. This is on the link. Sorry it didn't link but you can Google that logo then thread systems. Hope that works for you.

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