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Thread: What do you cover your ironing table with?

  1. #1
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    What do you cover your ironing table with?

    Making an ironing table, and I have seen and read many variations of what materials to use. I believe I will use 100% cotton batting, and then cotton canvas. But I have read where others use silver ironing fabric which does not get nearly as dirty as canvas, as it can be wiped clean. If you have a self made ironing table, would you share with me the materials you used that have worked successfully? Thanks!!!

  2. #2
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    I covered mine with batt and thick cotton muslin. I iron a square of freezer paper to the surface if I am using fusible and peel it off and replace it when it gets dirty.

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    I got mine from Nancy's Notions. It is made by BoNash or something. Comes in two sizes. I has adehisive on one side and sticks to your board. It is silver. I love, love, love it.

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    I can't tolerate the smell of the silver ones, and have known people who insist they are allergic to the coating and that it causes breathing problems for them. I have looked at all the instructions for making your own big board. Final decision is that I am in the process of making a removable cover for it. The last cover I made for the pointy ironing board was white denim with a few lines drawn with black magic marker as guidelines for pressing long seams that I did not want to be curved. This cover is a figured cotton, same weight as for patchwork. The board is 3/4" plywood cut to 18" X 60", well sanded and corners slightly curved. I covered the board with two layers of a thrift store wool blanket. I used an upholstery tool that has sharp nails that bite into the fabric so you can hold it tight while using a stapler or tacks. My husband loaned me one of his Arrow staplers that was easier on my wrists and hand than the shorter red stapler I bought with the upholstery kit years ago.
    During my lifetime I have seen many old ironing boards that were padded only with two layers of wool, and some padded with batting. I hated the ones that had a thin layer of foam for padding. If two layers of wool proves inadequate, there is always the staple puller and a do-over.

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elnan View Post
    ...with a few lines drawn with black magic marker as guidelines for pressing long seams that I did not want to be curved. ...
    I love this idea. thanks
    Nancy in western NY
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    I did basically what elnan described. I just used a cute sewing pattern fabric. The fabric lasted me over 6 years before I had to "patch" the area I used the most (I had same fabric leftover) and am just carrying on. My padding was some warm and natural. I love my big board.

  7. #7
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    My DH made a board that fit over my big ironing board. We covered it with many layers of good cotton batting, in fact I think we got a thrift store mattress pad and used that first then covered it with batting. I have many pieces of designer Uphostery fabric that is 100% cotton and we stapled it down. When I want to change it, we will just remove the staples. We have had this about 5 years now and it's in great condition still. To be honest though, I usually use it for only ironing the top and back when I'm ready to long arm.

  8. #8
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    I like my ironing board to be flat. I don't use batting. For my regular ironing board (the scissors kind) I use denim or really heavy cotton fabric (I think it is called 'duck') in a medium color, so it doesn't show dirt or burnt on starch. This can be washed and put back on.

    For my home-made wooden board that is 32" x 24", I put down a layer of Insulbright and then cover it with denim or a heavy cotton. This is stapled to the board. However, next time I will make one and put a cord around the edge so that I can gather it up and then be able to just untie it and wash it and then put it back on when it gets dirty.

    The reason that I don't use batting on my boards is because I feel that blocks iron much flatter when there isn't any puffiness on the ironing board.

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    I use some wool coating yardage underneath a remnant of cotton drapery fabric that is densely woven like denim or canvas. The wool fabric is an old piece that I think is 100% melton. Once washed, it is very flat and dense. A double layer was stretched and stapled to the plywood, then I wrapped the upholstery around the board. The weight of the board holds the canvas in place really well, and I can remove it easily for washing. I use this board for dressmaking, too, so I like having the wool for steaming and shaping seams correctly.
    Elizabeth

  10. #10
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    I just use the silver stuff from Joann's.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I covered mine with batt and thick cotton muslin. I iron a square of freezer paper to the surface if I am using fusible and peel it off and replace it when it gets dirty.
    Tartan, I love your freezer paper idea and will use it. I find myself washing my cover more often than it needs it, and fusibles don't wash out completely. Thanks for the tip.
    "The great doing of little things makes the great life." Eugena Price

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    Two thick cotton towels and a piece of striped cotton duck. It's been on the board for about 3 years. The condition is not perfect, but it's not terrible either.
    A quilt is like a good life. It's full of mistakes, but, in the end, it looks pretty good.

  13. #13
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    I bought one at JAF and it has a (cloth) pocket for ironing accessories such as pressing cloths. Some day when I get semi caught up, I'd love to make one out of quilting fabric. At least that's been the plan for the last few decades. I wanted something I could easily get on and off for machine washing.

  14. #14
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    Mine is 24 x60, and has 'cleats' that keep it in place right over my regular ironing board... (in case I ever decide to iron any of my husband's shirts.) I used 3/4 inch furniture grade plywood, 2 layers cotton batting, a layer of the silver stuff and then 100% cotton home dec fabric. Stapled it on the back with heavy duty stapler...

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    Hubs gave me a piece of plywood that I covered with already quilted ironing cover fabric. Stapled to the board and it's heavy enough to stay in place on my regular ironing board. I often place it against my cutting table so my larger pieces of fabric don't brush the floor.

  16. #16
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    I covered my small portable ironing board with a very old terry towel. It has just a bit of cushioning but is thin enough to give a firm surface. It is wrapped and pinned underneath so that I can take it off to wash it. I find that between it and my ironing pad that I lay on my cutting table, I rarely get out the traditional ironing board anymore.

  17. #17
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    I used batting and canvas, stretched it as tight as we could and then spritzed with water several times to let the fabric shrink tight around the board. My big one has been in use for at least 8-10 years...isnt as pretty but not too bad. I also made one smaller for classes and travel. Sprayed adhesive spray on it thinking it was starch...duh! Made it somewhat of a mess but it still works fine. I made a muslin pillow case to cover it so it did not look so bad when I take it to class. When it gets yucky, I just wash it or sew another one. I also covered the board in a heavy duty plastic bag so the moisture from steam does not cause the wood to warp.

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    I just covered my old yucky looking cover with a shaped piece if heavy muslin. I can take that off and wash when I like. I use a square of freezer paper on my "most used" spot to keep it looking cleaner longer.
    I don't want too much batting on that board. Just one layer of medium batt is enough. You want that board to be quite hard so that your seams press nice and crisp.

    I made a small ironing board for taking to classes. About 12 X 18 inches of this board, a layer of batt and a cover of heavy muslin. I use that one a lot, right next to my sewing machine when doing lots of short seams that need to be pressed before they are sewn into something else.

    Then I made the 3 X 6 inch one. I was making a table topper and didn't want to put binding on it. So I sewed it RST and turned it right side out through an opening. Then I thought those outside seams would be so much easier to get turned correctly if I could press those seams open first. I made that tiny ironing board, slipped it into the topper through the opening, moved it around as needed to press those seams open, then took it back out through the same hole. Worked fantastically. I'll keep that little ironing board in case I need it again.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
    Super Member Aurora's Avatar
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    I use heavyweight muslin from Walmart. When they have it, I usually purchase 5 yards at a time because I use it for lots of projects (I do prewash it because it is prone to shrinkage).
    Aurora

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    There's a thread over in the Main section that talks about wool ironing pads/mats. This gave me an idea! What if you used wool batting with heavy muslin (like an inexpensive drop cloth) over the top? You could staple it to the underside to keep it stable.

    ~ C
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-09-2017 at 05:23 AM. Reason: shouting

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