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Thread: What would you charge

  1. #26
    Super Member cwessel47's Avatar
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    I agree with the others that $150 is too low. As I hand quilt, I charge 3X material costs and sometimes more depending on the intricacy of the pattern and quilting. Fact of the matter is that you may sit on a product for a really long time that way. I'm sure your MIL appreciates beautiful eye-catchers in her store however. If you look at it that way - and remember to tag the item correctly, and make it known that you are willing to do commissions ( state your parameters here - this pattern, your colors; any pattern , your colors, etc) you will find people who are interested in YOUR work. My items can sit for a long time on my artfire site - but when they do sell, I am one happy lady. Folks who undersell make me very angry. It hurts all of us who might like to make what we are worth! If all else fails - give it to someone who will appreciate it - or keep it for yourself!

  2. #27
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    I have no idea what to tell you price wise, but your quilt is lovely. I'd start on the higher price range - you can always mark it down some but you can't raise the price. Like someone else said - people love sales.

    Is the store in Jacksonville? Haven't been that way in quite a while but who knows where we'll be next.
    Last edited by Scakes; 12-25-2012 at 04:09 AM.

  3. #28
    Super Member Blinkokr's Avatar
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    Lovely, great job and thank you for sharing, $200.00
    Have a Blessed day and Merry Christmas
    Ellen

  4. #29
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Visit any Amish area and they are not shy about putting $400-$500 or more on their handmade quilts. Very much worth it. If your MIL wants homemade in her shop, she needs to pay the fair price for them. Is ths a "consignment" arrangement with you? Draw up a contract....this s a business relationship either way.

    Great quilt BTW.
    SANDY
    Sandygirl

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  5. #30
    Power Poster debcavan's Avatar
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    Sadly the time involvement is so great compared to what people want to pay. It is so pretty that lots of people would want to buy it until they hear the price.

    Think simpler quilts like an Irish chain. They look complicated.

    I get so many people who want to buy my quilts. They have no idea of the time involvement. My friend showed her quilt and someone saw it, fell in love and wanted to buy it. It was a queen size log cabin with hand applique, gorgeous thing. She was tired of it, never used it and thought $300. It paid for the fabrics and a little time but not much. No the person was not even willing to pay that, she was willing to pay less than the actual cost of the fabric.

    If you want to sell them and at least make fifty cents an hour, use bargain fabric and do a quick quilt that looks complicated. People don't know fabric quality, hardness of design or even workmanship, they see color and shape.

    But for this wonderful quilt, I see people wanting it for it's beauty but not willing to pay the time involvement plus cost of materials.
    DEB CAVAN

  6. #31
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    Beautiful quilt. I would put a higher price on it. I also think in the $200-$300 range. And yes if your MIL lets you use her distributors and her tax ID on the purchase of supplies that would be even better and it would definitely help you with the cost factor
    Patsy

  7. #32
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    What size is the Quilt/Quality of material/Type of Quilting done...FMQ/Longarm/tie etc.../binding or turning it inside out/do all the seams match?? Of course if its a design that is impossible to find in a store...that will bring the price up...You may want to start a service that personalizes the quilt...offer to use their children's clothes/Mothers/Fathers shirts...just an idea...they provide the material and you charge the same as if you were...People have no clue what its costs so they do not want to pay for it///and always think...what would I pay//pretend you are not a quilter and have no idea on the cost of materials. 59x59...that is a lap quilt...I would not pay more than $150.00
    Last edited by carolaug; 12-25-2012 at 05:22 AM.

  8. #33
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    i work in a quilt shop on long island and asked price. they think $150 is right in the ballpark. usually you charge 3 to 3 1/2 times what the material cost you. you cannot put a price on material and fabric. you'll be sitting with it a long time. good luck!

  9. #34
    Senior Member ghquilter53's Avatar
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    One way to calculate is to take the total square inches...59 X 59 and mulitply that time 10cents which comes to $348.10. Another is to take the cost of all the materials and multiply by 3.

  10. #35
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    My MIL's shop is in Lewistown PA. Not a high dollar clientele there. Thank you all for your input! I think I have made a decision. I am going to tell her $225 and if it doesn't sell within a month to put a 10% off sign on it. If it still doesnt sell then my MIL will have a nice lapquilt for herself as a gift from me of course.

  11. #36
    Super Member Cindy60545's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by debcavan View Post
    Sadly the time involvement is so great compared to what people want to pay. It is so pretty that lots of people would want to buy it until they hear the price.

    Think simpler quilts like an Irish chain. They look complicated.

    I get so many people who want to buy my quilts. They have no idea of the time involvement. My friend showed her quilt and someone saw it, fell in love and wanted to buy it. It was a queen size log cabin with hand applique, gorgeous thing. She was tired of it, never used it and thought $300. It paid for the fabrics and a little time but not much. No the person was not even willing to pay that, she was willing to pay less than the actual cost of the fabric.

    If you want to sell them and at least make fifty cents an hour, use bargain fabric and do a quick quilt that looks complicated. People don't know fabric quality, hardness of design or even workmanship, they see color and shape.

    But for this wonderful quilt, I see people wanting it for it's beauty but not willing to pay the time involvement plus cost of materials.
    I agree wholeheartedly with this. I've also got quilts for sale, but am unwilling to drop my prices. I've used good quality material, spent time LAing them & so forth. I'm not going to turn around and give them away just because a non-quilter wants to pay Walmart prices. If that's what they want to pay, go to Walmart & let it fall apart in a year! Mine last forever! I do have repeat customers that commission me to make quilts for them, but they know I don't use cheap materials & know I spend the necessary time to complete a quality product.
    What I do to come up with price is take all the materials, quilting, etc & double that amount for the time I've spent on it. Hence, if your costs amount to $150, you should be asking $300 for that quilt. Don't be shy either, stick to your guns on the price. If it sits for several months, then discount it 10-15% & maybe it'll sell. Don't sell yourself short! Too many people out there are not recouping their costs for material, don't be one of them.

  12. #37
    Member needlefruit's Avatar
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    Ditto on all the replies re demographics. In South Central Texas, $150 is too low. After about 6 years of selling quilts & quilted items at a high end, jurored Christmas event nearby, my daughter and I arrived @$6.75/sq ft. ($163.17) for a 59x59. HOWEVER, we scoured the area for fabric and batting sales, and we stayed with simpler pieced patterns to keep that rate down. A more complicated pattern such as yours made from fabrics purchased at the going rate would have be much more or you would be giving them away! A good way to determine a 'gettable' rate for your area is to visit local quilt shops and check the prices on their displayed quilts. We made notes on sizes and prices and then came home and did the math. Good luck!

  13. #38
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Here's what bothers me:Why will ordinarily sane women go buy a bracelet for $$$ and then add charms in the $$ range and not pay $$$ for a nicely constructed handmade quilt ? Or pay upwards of $300 for a stinkin' purse because some famous person has their name stamped on it. Quiltmakers need to stand firm on their value...what makes that tough is the economy. But we now pay up to $15 a yard for fabric (which is narrower, have you noticed?), so if someone wants to work for free or make goods and sell them for the enjoyment of it...well, that makes it hard on those who do need to make money this way. If someone really wants something, they find a way to pay the asking price. If you reduce the price on this quilt, you will be expected to continue doing so. IMHO
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  14. #39
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    Melody: Your quilt is beautiful. I do not make any quilt for sale, as people are not willing to pay for the cost of materials, quitting, and time spent. I agree that $300 is a fair price, but you might consider making some smaller things, and realize that most people still think that Wallmart prices are what the going price is. I was a potter in Japan and could sell my things there, but here I was told that the prices were too high. Remember the cost of your time is important and just because you enjoy doing it, you should get paid a fair amount.
    Ms. Mouse

  15. #40
    Power Poster gabeway's Avatar
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    I would consider at least cost plus 25% on to as a minimum. Great job on quilt.
    Wayne & Gabriele, the married quilters.

  16. #41
    Super Member 4EVERquilt's Avatar
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    It is well worth over 150.00, I would go 250.00 at least.
    will quilt 4EVER

  17. #42
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    I think $150 is way too low, I'd do a minimum of $250-$300. I once saw the Eleanor Burns log cabin wreath at Keepsake Quilting,nicely done, but non-descript fabric and thewoman wanted $400, that's ridiculous for a quilt less than 36" square, maybe a queen at the very least for that price. However, most people don't want to pay what the quilt is worth just in fabric alone,they like Wal -Mart prices, but I don't think they have ever really compared the two, as there is no comparison. When I first started crafting in the "stone ages", the norm was 3 times the cost of materials, but a lot depends on the demographics. I'm sure this is clear as mud, but never price your quilts based on chain store quilts. Best of luck to your MIL on her craft store. You might also make lower priced items, like placemats and matching napkins, table runners, small wall hangings, etc.

  18. #43
    Senior Member A1penny's Avatar
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    At least double what it cost to make it.....then add a bit extra depending on the clients who come to the shop.

  19. #44
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    Goodness someone has to put a foot down here !


    No lower than $300.00 or I will personally fly out there ,on my broom, and shake you. Sorry, your husband may be a sweetheart but he obviously knows nothing about quilts....
    keep him in the bedroom not the sewing room !

  20. #45
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    LOL ok ok Thank you for the input.

  21. #46
    Senior Member tulip43's Avatar
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    I agree with all the replies. lovely quilt

  22. #47
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    I have to agree with all comments here. $150 is way too little to charge. In your area, is there the type of clientele that would pay what it is obviously worth? If not, I'd stick to table runners/placemats/mug rugs, etc. Let us know how it all plays out...

  23. #48
    Super Member LindaMRB's Avatar
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    LOTS of good advice here that I cannot add to other than to suggest you look at Etsy pricing.
    People have no clue what goes into a quilt but you should at the very minimum get the cost of materials and electricity.
    Then start buying material with a discount and try to price them higher.
    At some point, I'd rather donate than sell for less than the worth. Makes me angry so I'd rather give to someone who would appreciate it and cannot afford anything like it at all.
    IMHO

  24. #49
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    My theory..you never know WHO will walk inthe door and plop the $$$ down! Don't assume anything!
    Sandy
    Sandygirl

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  25. #50
    Super Member Sandee's Avatar
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    Speaking of what the Amish charge: my DDIL's parents recently bought a full/double size quilt from the Amish in Indiana, & they paid $1000.00 for it.

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