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Thread: What would you charge

  1. #1
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    What would you charge

    My mother in law just retired and opened a country craft shop. She asked me to make a couple of lap quilts for her shop since she is getting requests from customers. This quilt is 59 x 59. What would you charge. I was thinking 150 before I finished it. Now that I am done, 150 barely covers the cost of making it. What would you charge. ( My dear husband thinks 150 is way too much ) Really???
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  2. #2
    Super Member tealfalcon's Avatar
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    I personally feel that 150.00 is to cheap....but it really depends on your demographics.. people these days dont want to pay a ton for quilts....although you do run across a group of people who do appreciate handmade quilts. I know I have lost customers based simply on the cost of supplies.. lovely quilt btw

  3. #3
    Super Member tatavw01's Avatar
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    You should use her tax id to get fabric whole sale than see if it's worth it....Once again people who don't value what it takes to make a quilt say it's too much. I think 150.00 is too little. Maybe make place mats. by the way the quilt is beautiful, great job!!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member nance-ell's Avatar
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    $150 sounds really low to me. However, you have consider your market. What kind of customer comes to the shop? Is the shop in an affluent area where price isn't an obstacle for her customers? I would probably put a higher price... even as high as $300 (rule of thumb - double your material cost) and if a after numerous attempts to close a sale, no one bites, your MIL could discount 20 or 25%. Buyers always love buying an item "on sale". It's just psychology! In the end, your customers will drive the price point you can reach ... then you can decide if it's worth your effort. Good luck to your MIL... I envision myself doing something similar in about 10-15 years :-)
    Nancy

  5. #5
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    I totally agree with the ones on the board 150.00 is way to low. Your time and all the work put into the quilt is worth more than 150. You need to up the price quite a bit hon.
    Gods Blessings
    Happy Quilting

  6. #6
    Junior Member Narda H.'s Avatar
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    A lovely quilt made in America by an American . Thats a point right there. Calculate all materials and the cost if you had it quilted. Then how many hours it took to make it and charge what you would like per hour i.e. $20.That will be your total. Look at it and decide if that will be a good price. Sometimes if the price is too low people will think its not worth it. You could raffle it too.
    Have discovered paper piecing!
    OH YEAH

  7. #7
    Super Member nabobw's Avatar
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    Sorry but your husband did not do all the work.

  8. #8
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Depending on the geographic location, quilts can be a really hard sell. Shoppers are looking for Walmart prices. I agree with the poster who said to estimate the number of hours in the project. Then realize that there's no way you will even get minimum wage When you add in costs of materials, and estimate $75 just for the quilting, you are in the stratosphere!
    That's why people just take the NON SALE cost of the fabric, batting & thread and double or tripple it.
    I would provide the hours worked and the material and quilting costs to your DMIL, and tell her that unless she feels that she can get the big bucks, the large quilt will be a one of a kind, but you will love to make smaller quilty things, like placemats or totes until you see what sells. You might be pleasantly surprized!
    If forced to come up with a dollar amount, I would think the 200 to 300 dollar range.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  9. #9
    Senior Member Plumtree's Avatar
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    I know there are math formulas to figure it all out but my general rule of thumb is to at least double what I spent on ALL materials used to make the quilt then add about $30 handling fees. For the quilt you have pictured I wouldn't go lower than $175-200 then if you feel like you need to put it on sale you could go to $150 but that is a steal of a price. Just because it is a hobby for you and you would do it if no one paid you doesn't mean your time isn't worth anything. I would definitately try to use your mom's tax id to purchase materials at wholesale--of course only on the material that you are going to use for selling quilts ;-)
    Good luck on your adventure

  10. #10
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    it's a gorgeous quilt. as the others have said, worth more than 150, but only if you are in an area where folks will pay that much.
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?


  11. #11
    Super Member wesing's Avatar
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    Another thing you need to remember is that you are setting a precedent. If you price your item too low, everyone who saw the low price will have that in their mind and it may be difficult to get more later. It is much easier to put something "on sale" as others have suggested. I hope you can get a price you are happy with.

    Darren

  12. #12
    Power Poster Diane007's Avatar
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    Ditto l agree with all the above....
    we work way too cheap.
    fabric plus time = 's

  13. #13
    Super Member ruthrings's Avatar
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    My thought was, Are you doing this for your MIL or for yourself? Is she paying you to attract quilters or for the privilege of having the quilt displayed in the shop, or will there be a buyer who pays you directly? If it's the former, you can go low. Otherwise, I've turned down offers to make a quilt for pay because there's no way you earn what it's worth. Yours is especially beautiful and intricate and took lots of hours over and above cost of materials.
    Ruth

  14. #14
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    I'm doing it more for my mother in law. But she refuses to keep the profits.
    Thank you everyone for your input.

  15. #15
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    If $150 barely covers your costs (and does not include your time) you must also factor in the questions of do you want to make lap quilts to sell at cost or at a profit and do you actually want to commit to a lap quilt business?

  16. #16
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    I always find it so interesting to hear input about selling quilts. I have not ever sold a quilt, so take my opinion with a grain of salt. I would put a higher price tag of say $400 with the make an offer price tag, and state this is a one of a kind quilt, hand made in America by an American artist, I would also advertise that custom quilts are commissioned. If it doesn't sell in a period of a few months take your quilt back. Don't leave it their for a long period of time allowing the customer's to say "see nobody would pay that". Truth be told our handmade quilts are a work of art and quite different from a Walmart quilt or a quilt from a high end store. They are one of a kind with lots of skill and talent used to create them. Either you have someone who is very fond of you and makes you a handmade quilt or you pay for it. However, as Greenheron stated factor in the question of do you want to make lap quilts to sell at cost or profit.
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  17. #17
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    Very nice! I also think $150 is to cheap. I'm new at quilting but I've bought them a lot and paid more than that.

  18. #18
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    When I saw your quilt, my thought was offer it for $250.00. And even at that price I think it's worth more. Depends on economics of where you live. I think it would be good to advertise as Grace Creates stated. Good luck.
    margaret

  19. #19
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    very nice! Ask you MIL for what you feel you need for it. Then let her,put a retail price on it. I feel $150.00 is way too low.!!!!! Tinker

  20. #20
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    It truly depends on who is looking to buy the quilts and how much they can spend. I agree the $150.00 would be low, but maybe if you had a couple of simpler quilts that would be less expensive, then the more detailed quilts wouldn't seem like so much because they can see the difference. A friend of mine used to make quillows for a touristy gift shop in Oregon. She charged $60.00 (this was 10 years ago) and the flew off the shelves. She used fabric that fit the area and the quillow worked well in a car. She could put them together quickly and didn't make a living at it, but it gave her something to do and some money to spend on other items.

  21. #21
    Super Member joym's Avatar
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    wow..I was surprised at the responses thinking 150.00 is too low. If it were mine, I would probably charge the same as in trying to sell my own quilts, I never have luck with getting a good price for them. Btw, not the ones I have shown here on QB !!!! People will just not pay for the cost of materials, time etc. Sad, but they would rather get theirs from Walmart etc. I am not saying yours is not worth more only that people will not pay what it is worth. However, good luck.

  22. #22
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    Unfortunately there is little money in making quilts to sell unless you are a well know quilt artist. We have a lady here who has a group called Caritas Quilters and they use strictly donated fabrics and quilt them themselves. She does manage to sell a lot, but she is selling completed quilts for 1.5 cents a square inch, and that is what a lot of longarm quilters charge just to quilt. Perhaps she could post information in her shop and take orders for quilts that she could get prepaid orders for, using this quilt as an example of your work. otherwise you may be putting in a lot of time and money and get no buyers.

  23. #23
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    Thank you all for the input. I am really not looking to get into making the quilts to sell. This is the fifth quilt I have made. I mostly make them as gifts for family. This will be the first one I " put a price " on, and as stated it is more as a favor for my mother in law.

  24. #24
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I agree 150.00 not enough!!!!!!

  25. #25
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    Don't know about the charging, but the quilt is just lovely.

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