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Thread: The best roast you will ever eat!

  1. #1
    mac
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    The best roast you will ever eat!

    I just made the best roast I have made in a long time. It was tender, juicy and it took very little work. I just couldn't believe the recipe, so I had to make it. You cook it for very few minutes and then turn off the oven and then walk away. I read a lot of the reviews and they were very positive, so I just had to try it.

    I used a 4.5 pound roast and used their timetable, cooked the roast at 500 degrees for 22.5 minutes and then turned the oven off. You don't open the oven door for three hours or until your oven has cooled down and when you open the door, there is this beautiful roast. Many of the reviewers said that they had been doing their roast this way for years and it worked every time. Others said that this recipe works on all types of meat: pork, lamb and someone even said that they did a turkey this way. Although I would be very leery about doing a turkey, so I wouldn't recommend it on poultry.

    It is called: Hi-temp Roast Beef - The Best Roast You Will Ever Eat!

    Here is the website: www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/beef/hi-temp-roast-beef-the-best-roast-2.html#page6

    This is so easy, even a novice cook could do this and make a tasty tender roast the first time. Let me know what you think...




  2. #2
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    I have been wanting to try this for a long time, but as I'm single, it seemed rather silly to do it just for me.
    BUT, I've decided, because I LOVE beef in all it's forms, that I will try it as soon as a good cut of roast goes on sale at my Kroger. I will then section the cooked roast into freezable portions for use later as I have learned not to fret about previously frozen cooked meats.
    Thanks for the reminder!
    Jan in VA
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  3. #3
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    I take either a Rump roast or a less tender cut roast.
    Take out of wrapper, stab with a fork or metal skewer
    Place in ziploc bag, put the ziploc bag in a large bowl
    Pour marinade (1/4 soy sauce, 3 cloves of garlic finely minced, cracked pepper and 1/8 cup olive oil) for 12 hours in the frige
    Drain on wire rack while oven preheats

    Heat oven to 500 degrees
    Place roast on a roasting rack inside a foil lined pan
    Roast for 25 minutes at 500 degrees
    LEAVE in oven, turn temperature down to 325 degrees
    Roast uncovered for 20 minutes per pound

    Let stand for 30 minutes then slice thin for sandwiches for the week

    I have one of these......for slicing
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    This works for Prime Rib, never occurred to me to do it with regular roast.

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    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    I read the review and it said it might be too rare for some people and the picture shows it pretty rare for me. I think I’ll just stick to my own way of cooking a roast: sear it in olive oil, add onions and garlic. Make brown gravy. Put roast in crock pot, add the cooked onions/garlic. Pour gravy over it and cook at least 4 hours on high. In winter I add carrots and potatoes.

  6. #6
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Must try it! For yrs I have done my 6lb rib roast similar. Season, cook 1 hr @375, let rest in oven 3 hrs. Turn oven to 375 again and cook 45 min. Let stand 10 min out of oven ...140F. Always successful.

  7. #7
    mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanabee Quiltin View Post
    I read the review and it said it might be too rare for some people and the picture shows it pretty rare for me. I think I’ll just stick to my own way of cooking a roast: sear it in olive oil, add onions and garlic. Make brown gravy. Put roast in crock pot, add the cooked onions/garlic. Pour gravy over it and cook at least 4 hours on high. In winter I add carrots and potatoes.
    The reviews also said that you could cook it a few minutes more per pound to get it closer to well done. In my house I like medium rare and my husband loves well done with absolutely no red showing. The smaller part of the roast was well done and I had my med/rare on the larger side. We were both happy with it. And was it tender? Oh, yes it was.

  8. #8
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I don't have a roasting rack. would a cookie rack be all right. i have two black ones but not sure what the coating on it is like in oven. maybe not made for that...
    I cooked one in the slow cooker and it was tough to me. still haven't made a nice juicy one.
    Last edited by nativetexan; 06-11-2018 at 08:22 AM.

  9. #9
    mac
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    I didn't use a roasting rack, just an aluminum, rectangular baking pan, with the roast set right on top of the pan.

    You could use a cast iron frying pan, if you have one. Whatever you use, make sure that it can take the high heat. I was going to use my ceramic coated cast iron Dutch oven, but then realized that the heat might crack the ceramic portion of the pot.

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    Although this sounds like it would make a melt in your mouth piece of meat...sitting in an oven for hours- doesn't that encourage bacterial growth that might be harmful? Don't know, just asking. I personally will " cook" some cuts of beef low and long, but not turning off oven and letting it sit in there til oven cools down....

  11. #11
    mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    Although this sounds like it would make a melt in your mouth piece of meat...sitting in an oven for hours- doesn't that encourage bacterial growth that might be harmful? Don't know, just asking. I personally will " cook" some cuts of beef low and long, but not turning off oven and letting it sit in there til oven cools down....
    One of the reviewers of the recipe gave an explanation as to why this does not encourage bacterial growth. It was inline with what I have always read about meat. A solid piece of meat, such as a roast will only have bacteria growth on the outside of the meat. Chopped up meat, such as hamburger, can have growth all over all of the cut pieces which is why it has to be cooked to a higher temperature to be considered safe.

    The reviewer said that the 500 degree temperature is enough to kill all of the bacteria growth on the outside of the roast, as long as you don't make deep cuts into the meat. Some people like to poke holes in the roast and shove garlic and other herbs into a roast. This would be, in my opinion, a no-no. Making long slits into the roast could bring the bacteria on the outside of the roast into the inside of the roast where the heat may not kill the bacteria.

    We all have to use our best judgment on what is safe cooking and what is not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    I have been wanting to try this for a long time, but as I'm single, it seemed rather silly to do it just for me.
    BUT, I've decided, because I LOVE beef in all it's forms, that I will try it as soon as a good cut of roast goes on sale at my Kroger. I will then section the cooked roast into freezable portions for use later as I have learned not to fret about previously frozen cooked meats.
    Thanks for the reminder!
    I have been doing this also, since I am now single, too. It started with the leftover food from the funeral. I had at least 10 containers with a full meal. Wonderful chicken, mashed potatoes, green beans and gravy. So nice to get that out of the freezer and heat it in the microwave or in a pot on the stove. It works best if I heat it for a minute or so, then let it set for a while so the heat spreads throughout, then heat for another minute or so.

    Now I make big meals like I used to and put containers in the freezer. I now have at least 4 different kinds of meals in there. I cook when I feel like it and grab one of these when I don't.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  13. #13
    Super Member Chasing Hawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    I don't have a roasting rack. would a cookie rack be all right. i have two black ones but not sure what the coating on it is like in oven. maybe not made for that...
    I cooked one in the slow cooker and it was tough to me. still haven't made a nice juicy one.
    Sure, Do you have a wire rack? Like one that you would use to cool baked items.

    line the cookie sheet with foil. Then double up a piece of foil to form a pan to place the wire rack in. Then proceed with the coking process. All that foil might seem excessive but it sure beats scouring brunt on mess off the cookie sheet.

    I roast a 5 to 6 lb roast for about 1 hr. 20 mins........we like our roast medium rare to rare. You have to take into account carryover heat after removing it from the oven, if using my recipe.
    Everyone is born right handed, only the gifted overcome it.
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    “If you can’t see a mistake from 12 feet away, it doesn’t exist, and there are no perfect quilts and that helps a lot,” .......Greg Biornstad

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    I did a prime rib this way last Christmas. It did come out very rare on the inside but since the leftovers were going to be heated after freezing I just reheated in the toaster oven on broil and it was perfect.

    Meant to add that without the foil those brown bits make the most wonderful gravy or au gus. (sp) The pan came clean with only a little soaking.
    Last edited by susiequilt; 06-12-2018 at 08:22 AM.
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    Super Member Darcyshannon's Avatar
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    I will have to try this in cooler weather. Right now it is too hot to think of a roast dinner

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