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Thread: canning jellies

  1. #1
    Super Member fred singer's Avatar
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    does anyone can with a steam canner.
    I was wondering if when making jelly you use a steam canner or waterbath or none at all
    I just got a steam canner

    as hot as it is here I was hoping not have water bath my jelly

  2. #2
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    with jellies, I've only ever used water bath canning.

  3. #3
    Super Member huntannette's Avatar
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    same here
    Quote Originally Posted by nycquilter
    with jellies, I've only ever used water bath canning.

  4. #4
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    I just filled the clean jars to almost 1/8 inch full then make sure rim is clean and put lid and ring on. The heat seals it when it cools. Has always worked for me.

  5. #5
    Super Member fred singer's Avatar
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    thank-you all I just had trouble with rhubarb & strawberry going bad they were sealed

  6. #6
    Super Member hobo2000's Avatar
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    I just finished 12 jars of Naval orange marmalade and did the 10 min water bath. I prefer that to the steamer which I use for meats, stews, tomatoes, and other high acid things.

  7. #7
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    When I, my mom or my grandmother made jelly/jam/preserves, we always just used a layer of melted parafin wax. And we didn't use canning jars either. We saved appropriate-sized jars (from pickles, peanut butter, etc.) and used those for jelly. We all had a separate pan (or more likely an empty coffee can or something similar) for melting the wax. As the jelly cooled, the wax cooled and sealed the jar. I'm aware that that method is not advised nowadays, but it's been used for decades. None of us ever had a problem and the product would last for years. We never refrigerated our open jelly jars, either. My family went through it so fast it never had a chance to get moldy or whatever.

  8. #8
    Super Member raedar63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol's Quilts
    When I, my mom or my grandmother made jelly/jam/preserves, we always just used a layer of melted parafin wax. And we didn't use canning jars either. We saved appropriate-sized jars (from pickles, peanut butter, etc.) and used those for jelly. We all had a separate pan (or more likely an empty coffee can or something similar) for melting the wax. As the jelly cooled, the wax cooled and sealed the jar. I'm aware that that method is not advised nowadays, but it's been used for decades. None of us ever had a problem and the product would last for years. We never refrigerated our open jelly jars, either. My family went through it so fast it never had a chance to get moldy or whatever.
    I mostly do freezer jams, but when I have done jelly in the past I use the wax method as well. I have also used water bath.

  9. #9
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    When you say "canning", I think "HOT!" I've used a waterbath for years and picked currants yesterday morning, so let's give a cheer for currant jelly!

  10. #10
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    This week I opened a forgotten jar of 1999 Plum Jam. It was slightly discolored but tasted good.
    When I made jam or jelly, I boiled it and put it in jars. The flat lids were kept in just less than boiling water and put on the clean tops fast, then the rings screwed down tightly. Later I would punch each top to see if it would pop down, if not it went into hot water for a boil. Then I'd let them set for a couple of days.

    If it was thick, it was labeled jam or marmalade or jelly. If not, then it was labeled Pancake Syrup!!!

  11. #11
    Super Member Rose Bagwell's Avatar
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    I do jelly all the time and I use a big pot with round cake racks on bottom. I always sterilize/steam my jellies, they last longer, but my girlfriend never does. So I guess it's really up to you and how long you plan to store them.

  12. #12
    Junior Member mdollar's Avatar
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    I have an old pressure cooker that I use for my water bath. It works great and I can get a lot of jars done at one time.

  13. #13
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    I use a boiling water bath, no steam canner is needed, according to the Ball Canning Book.

  14. #14
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    I thought a steam caner was used for low-acid foods only, like green beans, meats and the like. Am I wrong?

  15. #15
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    I have canned my own jellies & jams for years. I never put them in a bath to process. I just boil the jars & lids. cook down the fruit & cook as the fruit pectin instructs. Then I remove jars from boiling as I full them. Make sure to wipe the top of jar after filling & put hot lid & ring on & tighten down & turn them upside down for about 5 minuets. Then turn them right side up & they will seal on their own. All the years I've made it this way have only had 2 or 3 jars not seal & found the only reason they didn't, the jars had a small chip in the top of them that I didn't catch. I can at least 45 to 50 pints & half pints & sometimes more every year & give to family & friends for Christmas. If I miss a year doing this, everyone complains that they didn't get their jam.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
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    I make most of my jelly in the fall. Freeze the fruit now and when you have a chilly day make jelly and use a water bath. Or better yet make cheater jelly.

    1 pkg Kool-aid any flavor
    1 pkg Sure-jell
    3 cups sugar
    3 cups water

    Pour water into kettle. Add Kool-aid and pectin, stirring until thoroughly dissolves. Place kettle over heat, stirring constantly and bring to a rolling boil. Add sugar quickly stirring constantly. At first signs of active boil remove from heat, skim quickly and pour in glasses before jelly sets. Makes 5 glasses.

  17. #17
    Super Member fred singer's Avatar
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    I have what they call steamer canner it is to be used intead of the water canner takes i/2 the time as water canner and very little water.

  18. #18
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    I just fill the steralized jars and put on the lids and screw bands and say 'thank you' when I hear them seal. Give the ones away that don't seal and tell them to use first. Rhubarb does discolor even if it's sealed. Eat more, eat faster!

  19. #19
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    Thank You

  20. #20
    Senior Member Katiequiltsalot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred singer
    thank-you all I just had trouble with rhubarb & strawberry going bad they were sealed
    I always made freezer jam out of rhubarb and strawberry, they take so much sugar they don't freeze solid. In fact I like the freezer jams better.

  21. #21
    Junior Member jmanghamom's Avatar
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    The only thing I use my steam canner for is to can green beans or other vegetables that don't have any acid content. I have canned tuna when I had fresh albacore.

  22. #22
    Super Member Pats8e8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbrother
    I thought a steam caner was used for low-acid foods only, like green beans, meats and the like. Am I wrong?
    You are thinking of a pressure canner, they are used for low acid foods. A steam canner is used for high acid, jellies, jams, juices, and pickled products that have vinegar added.

  23. #23
    Super Member Pats8e8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmanghamom
    The only thing I use my steam canner for is to can green beans or other vegetables that don't have any acid content. I have canned tuna when I had fresh albacore.
    Ditto, you are thinking of a pressure canner, not a steam canner, see the other answer please.

  24. #24
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    I've never made any jelly using waterbath ????

  25. #25
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    It is all hot and seals itself.
    Freezer jams are really good too. (Strawberry) yum

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