Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26

Thread: Help! I need advice on Prime Rib How to!

  1. #1
    Super Member icon17's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Washington,State
    Posts
    1,689

    Help! I need advice on Prime Rib How to!

    I've cooked a Prime Rib before But! have been unsatisfied. So desided to check out the Web for Ideas!
    Now I'm really confused, I found some Recipes for Prime Rib that say You can cook it starting at
    550 degrees! 5 mins per pound. Like say a : 14 lbs prime would be- 14x5=70 divided 60=1hr 16min and as soon as the time goes off you turn Off your oven and leave it in for 2 hours never opening the oven door!!!
    So this is my ??? Has anyone here on the QB done this???
    Thanks to anyone who may help me with any suggestion. I want to have this for Christmas diner
    May Your Life Be Full of Charity and Love.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Challys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    No California
    Posts
    802
    I haven't done that, but do start mine at about 450 for about 15 mins. Then down to 350 and cook about 18 mins/lb and test with meat thermometer--remember it will cook a bit more once you take out of the oven. Good Luck!

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    you start it at a higher temp to seal in the juices-sear the meat---you would not want to leave it in at that high a temp for an hour---it would be charcoal when it came out---(my thinking)
    after sealing in the juices-browning the outside-you turn down the oven and cook it to the correct temperature.
    good luck-sounds good!
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  4. #4
    Super Member icon17's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Washington,State
    Posts
    1,689
    I forgot to say that on the 2 web sites there were lots of blogs from others who had tryed it all saying they were happy!
    May Your Life Be Full of Charity and Love.

  5. #5
    Super Member valleyquiltermo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    MO.
    Posts
    2,685
    Quote Originally Posted by Challys View Post
    I haven't done that, but do start mine at about 450 for about 15 mins. Then down to 350 and cook about 18 mins/lb and test with meat thermometer--remember it will cook a bit more once you take out of the oven. Good Luck!
    I do it this way also. I do put salt and dry mustard on the top, thats rib side up. I leave the thermometer in as we like ours med rare.Merry Christmas
    http://www.skillpages.com/DonnaValleyquiltermo
    Sweet Dreams come from under Cozy Quilts made with love.
    Life is short, take time to enjoy it. Play with your kids and g-kids,
    and do what you can for others.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Scraps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    892
    I have friends who did the 550 degrees and the oven is then turned OFF --------------the prime rib looks just like from a high priced restaurant. Pink - juicy - cooked. It really is how chefs do it. DON'T OPEN THE OVEN DOOR - NO PEEKING THEY SAY. Your braver than me - I never try anything new on guests - I do tests first :-)

  7. #7
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    I have ccoked literally tons of Prime Rib in my lifetime. I am in the "food" industry. YES do cook at a high temp to seal or sear in the juices. I do not typically go as high as 550 , but use 500 as my starting point. I do this for approx 20 minutes to 25 minutes ( this is largely depending on the BTU's of the oven). ( note : the fat lip should be on top, bones on the bottom) Once you can see a the outer portion is seared or completely browned to about 1/8 inch deep . Leave the roast in the oven ... but turn it down to 250-275.. the temp will "drift" down to that point. This is now the slow cooking part . Cook till it reaches 135 on the meat thermeter. This will produce a rare to medium rare roast. Do not carve for at least 10 minutes . The temp will gently rise a bit higher ( rare is between 135 -140 ) , but the juices will be retained more with in the roast when carving. If you cook till 140 the roast will continue to cook and the results will be more medium/to medium well.
    One note : cooking this method does produce less drippings for gravy, but there will be some shed during the carving. So use some type of carving pan that allows you to capture those juices for gravy or an au jus.
    Retain the bones , as you may want to use them for soup.... they do make the best beef stock for french onion soup.
    Last edited by Lori S; 12-20-2011 at 05:26 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ellen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    374
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/p...ipe/index.html

    This REALLY works. I've roasted 3 prime rib roasts this way and it's really foolproof. Absolutely no guess work. They were all wonderful. I'm making another one for Christmas dinner.
    Ellen......I'm gonna go play now

    http://bestsmileys.com/computer1/19.gif

    http://community.webshots.com/user/auntie_em22

  9. #9
    Senior Member Ellen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    374
    Be sure the roast is room temperature..........I think that's one of the secrets of success.
    Ellen......I'm gonna go play now

    http://bestsmileys.com/computer1/19.gif

    http://community.webshots.com/user/auntie_em22

  10. #10
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    So Plymouth, NY
    Posts
    2,327
    With the high price of beef, I'm scared to death that I'd ruin the roast. I only have prime rib once a year and it's at restaurant.

  11. #11
    Super Member quilter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ayr, Ontario
    Posts
    1,064
    Blog Entries
    326
    I have done it this way several times- it really works. Use a shallow pan and leave it uncovered. The only thing is you cannot open the oven door! Everything else needs to be cooked on the stovetop.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Newberg, OR
    Posts
    1,942
    I roast mine at 325 beginning to end. Nothing but garlic salt. It's always delicious and my family loves it. Use a meat thermometer and cook it to your desired degree of doneness, about 30 min. Per pound. Prime rib is delicious on it's own and doesn't need a lot of froo fraw (I just made up that culinary term).

  13. #13
    Super Member Enchanted Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    porter ok
    Posts
    1,324
    Blog Entries
    3
    I cook them just like Lori S. said but in my confection oven. Everyone loves them.
    Old Quilters never die they just go to pieces.!!!!!!I love sewing and have plenty of material witnesses. ......

  14. #14
    Super Member quiltingnonie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    small town in Oregon
    Posts
    1,715
    We always use the recipe on the box of Morton's Kosher Salt. The salt crust keeps the roast juicy - and don't worry, it does't come out salty! We remove the prime rib from the oven @ 135-140 degrees to rest to get a med rare cut in the center, medium on the ends.
    To QUILT is human.
    To FINISH is divine.
    http://signatures.mylivesignature.co...4369F3FA17.png

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1
    2 years ago i did the same thing as you - searched and found the 550 instructions and figured what the heck i would try it... i did my math carefully and about 1 minute before the oven was to be turned off it started to smell - burnt... oh i was mad... after spending so much money on this and it was burning ARGGG... so i continued on let it go for the last minute and turned the oven off... i am proud to say i resisted the urge to peek (that was the hardest part LOL) when the 2 hours were up i pulled it out expecting it to be terrible OMG i was so surprised!!! it was perfect! absolutely perfect! For the first time i cooked prime rib at home and it tasted just like restaurant prime rib!!! I have used this technique several times on prime rib and even regular roast beef and wonderful every single time... I have played a little with the amount of liquid i add... i like au jus... so i add liquid to the pan... give it a try you will not be disappointed mmm i can hardly wait for my new years dinner now :-)

  16. #16
    Super Member Chele's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Belle Isle, Florida
    Posts
    6,737
    I've done the oven off method with success. I really liked Pioneer Woman's searing technique and spices on this recipe: http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2011/12/prime-rib/ I haven't tried it, but at least you could cook other things along with the roast.

  17. #17
    Super Member suebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,080
    YUMMY!!! I think I smell prime rib now

    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    I have ccoked literally tons of Prime Rib in my lifetime. I am in the "food" industry. YES do cook at a high temp to seal or sear in the juices. I do not typically go as high as 550 , but use 500 as my starting point. I do this for approx 20 minutes to 25 minutes ( this is largely depending on the BTU's of the oven). ( note : the fat lip should be on top, bones on the bottom) Once you can see a the outer portion is seared or completely browned to about 1/8 inch deep . Leave the roast in the oven ... but turn it down to 250-275.. the temp will "drift" down to that point. This is now the slow cooking part . Cook till it reaches 135 on the meat thermeter. This will produce a rare to medium rare roast. Do not carve for at least 10 minutes . The temp will gently rise a bit higher ( rare is between 135 -140 ) , but the juices will be retained more with in the roast when carving. If you cook till 140 the roast will continue to cook and the results will be more medium/to medium well.
    One note : cooking this method does produce less drippings for gravy, but there will be some shed during the carving. So use some type of carving pan that allows you to capture those juices for gravy or an au jus.
    Retain the bones , as you may want to use them for soup.... they do make the best beef stock for french onion soup.
    SUEB

  18. #18
    Senior Member Nancy Ingham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Shipshewana, IN
    Posts
    791
    Blog Entries
    3
    I have also used this method and got rave reviews, my guests still talk about my roast. Good luck and Happy Holidays!
    You can choose to live your live as though nothing is a miracle; or as though everything is a miracle!

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Magnolia, KY
    Posts
    877
    We celebrated Christmas on the 17th (kids and grandkids scatter on the 24th and 25th) so hubby cooked prime rib. He seasoned it with pepper, put it in a roasting pan on 450 for 15 mins and then turned it down to 325 for about 2 hrs. He kept checking the temperature. Then he made the gravy with beef broth and red wine. Yummy!!
    Pam Riggs

  20. #20
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,923
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    I have ccoked literally tons of Prime Rib in my lifetime. I am in the "food" industry. YES do cook at a high temp to seal or sear in the juices. I do not typically go as high as 550 , but use 500 as my starting point. I do this for approx 20 minutes to 25 minutes ( this is largely depending on the BTU's of the oven). ( note : the fat lip should be on top, bones on the bottom) Once you can see a the outer portion is seared or completely browned to about 1/8 inch deep . Leave the roast in the oven ... but turn it down to 250-275.. the temp will "drift" down to that point. This is now the slow cooking part . Cook till it reaches 135 on the meat thermeter. This will produce a rare to medium rare roast. Do not carve for at least 10 minutes . The temp will gently rise a bit higher ( rare is between 135 -140 ) , but the juices will be retained more with in the roast when carving. If you cook till 140 the roast will continue to cook and the results will be more medium/to medium well.
    One note : cooking this method does produce less drippings for gravy, but there will be some shed during the carving. So use some type of carving pan that allows you to capture those juices for gravy or an au jus.
    Retain the bones , as you may want to use them for soup.... they do make the best beef stock for french onion soup.
    this is exactly how I was taught...I do cover with foil during the RESTING phase though!

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Grants Pass, OR
    Posts
    1,979
    I start my rib roast at about 500 for 20-25 minutes and then set the oven to 300 and roast until thermometer is at 135-140. Always comes out great. Remember, that the roast should have been out of the refrigerator for about an hour to an hour and a half when you put it in the oven. Should take about 15 to 18 minutes per pound.

  22. #22
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    14,806
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    you start it at a higher temp to seal in the juices-sear the meat---you would not want to leave it in at that high a temp for an hour---it would be charcoal when it came out---(my thinking)
    after sealing in the juices-browning the outside-you turn down the oven and cook it to the correct temperature.
    good luck-sounds good!
    Her example was a 14 lb roast ... so it would not be charcoal!!




    Icon ... your math formula makes sense, though your math would be wrong ... 14 x 5 = 70 ... 70 divided by 60 would be 1 hr 10 minutes (not 16 minutes) ENJOY your roast!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  23. #23
    Super Member donnalynett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,318
    I was given a huge prime rib and have never cooked one before. Thank you for all the great tips and I guess I will be brave enough to cook it now!

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    7

    Prime Rib

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthPStitches View Post
    With the high price of beef, I'm scared to death that I'd ruin the roast. I only have prime rib once a year and it's at restaurant.
    I do this every Christmas and it is great. My guests brag about my prime rib.

    Heat oven to 500 degrees. Put prime rib in oven covered for 1 hour. After one hour, turn oven off and leave it in for 90 minutes. Comes out perfect. If you want it a little more done, leave in longer. No peeking while it is cooking.

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    7
    forgot to put in. This recipe is for a 10 pound prime rib

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.