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Thread: Prime rib anyone?

  1. #1
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    Prime rib anyone?

    I successfully prepared prime rib several years ago but do not remember the method. Anyone have a favorite recipe to share? Thank you.

  2. #2
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    I buy mine about a week to 10 days before I cook it - so it can age more - and then I put a salt and pepper rub on it about 24 hours before cooking it. Sometime a do the rub a few days before - it just depends when I remember to do it. Then I cook it on the Showtime Rotisserie for 17 minutes per pound. My family loves it. I always get the roast about 2 pounds more than I need because I use the left over beef to make beef stroganoff. (I cook the bones done and save the extra broth when I make stew.)

  3. #3
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    I recently saw an episode of "Cooks Country" or, perhaps, "America's Test Kitchen" on PBS which covered cooking prime rib. You might check those shows websites as they usually have recipes for food demo'd on TV. Think I will because that sounds great for Christmas dinner!

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    I make Prime Rib for Thanksgiving and this is what I do. Take the prime rib (boneless) out of the refrigerator about 1 hour before you are going to roast it. Rub in kosher salt and fresh ground pepper, you can add garlic powder and rosemary if you desire. Roast for 10 minutes per pound at 325 degree Fahrenheit until 125 degrees on a thermometer. Take out of oven and let it stand for 15-20 minutes before carving. The cooking time is an estimate because it can vary with the thickness of the meat. The biggest mistake people make is overcooking; if someone desires it cooked more, put the slice in a frying pan and cook that slice on top of the burner.

    I serve it with a horseradish cream. Whip unsweetened whip cream and when soft peaks form and add grated horseradish.

  5. #5
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    I also dry age a prime rib in the fridge for about a week before cooking it and I also serve it with horseradish cream. I will buy a whole root and grate it myself, much better than the store bought jarred stuff. I season it simply, salt and pepper generously applied to the outside just before cooking and a sprig or two of rosemary. I roast it at 325 to rare to medium rare. I like it bloody, my husband prefers it a little more cooked.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I age it for at least a week in the fridge set at 34 degrees unwrapped. ( I have extra fridge in garage) It looks dried out and that's what I want. I season it, cook it at high temp until reaches 120 degrees in the middle. Let set and it will continue to cook to about 130 degrees. Done. We have Prime Rib on New Year's Day. If you can't eat meat that is very pink in the center then don't waste your money on a Prime Rib. It's suppose to be pink. If someone (sister for example gets all ewww) I cut a piece and throw it in a skillet and brown it in butter. They are happy with overcooked and I'm happy knowing they are eating over cooked.
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  7. #7
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    My fave method--done this way for years . 6lb rib roast (I like the bone in)
    Season w/salt, pepper, garlic powder (rub in well). Preheat oven to 375, cook roast uncovered for 1 hour.
    Turn off oven (don't peek) and let set for 3 hours.
    Turn oven back on (375) and cook about 45 minutes. Chk for internal temp of 140. Let rest 10 min before cutting. It has always been a success for me.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I refuse to eat bloody meat of any kind. I prefer beef roast cooked well done.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  9. #9
    Member aashley333's Avatar
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    learned this on the food network--amazingly easy.

    Put roast on large piece of foil on broiler pan.
    Pour melted butter on one side and add rub.
    Place under broiler as close as possible for 5 minutes.
    Flip roast and repeat butter/rub.
    Place under broiler again for 8 minutes.

    Then, Seal in foil, leaving room above roast(dome-like) for 1 hour.


    In Texas, HEB has an Adam's prime rib rub!
    Perfectly medium-rare!

  10. #10
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    Yum, I love prime rib and serve it on Christmas Eve, I bake in the oven until medium rare, but i make yorkshire pudding with mine, now I'm hungry for prime rib
    Mary

  11. #11
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    I prefer to rub salt and pepper and garlic on my roast after letting age in refrigerator for about three or four days. I take it out of the fridge that morning and that is when I season it. I set my oven at 450 and place my room temperature roast in there for 15-20 minutes and then lower the temperature to 360 and cook for 15 minutes per pound. Comes out medium rare and perfect every time. I also make a horseradish/whipped cream/ little salt to go with it. Yummy!

  12. #12
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    iraxy's method looks no-fuss. Gonna try it!

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    I have used various methods over the years. Now I start hot for about 15 minutes to seer the meat, then turn the oven down to 275 and cook it low and slow.

    I am in the must be pink and bloody is ok by me. I have family members who do not like rare meat, I would not prepare Prime Rib for them. There are lots of other cuts that I can cook for those who like their beef well done.

    The standing time is important. The juices will stay in the meat, it also gives time to make the Yorkshire pudding.

    I either get the butcher to cut off the bones and tie them back on , or I do that myself. It just makes carving that much easier. I love gnawing on the bones too.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

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