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Thread: How in the WORLD do I cook a heart???

  1. #51
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    Just found this & thought someone might just appreciate it for their furbaby:
    http://www.dogsincanada.com/beef-heart-cookies

  2. #52
    Senior Member patsyo56721's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SparkMonkey
    A few days ago my boyfriend brought home a whole beef heart. He is extremely excited about it. I'm willing to try it, but I can't exactly say I'm chomping at the bit to get at it. I do like beef and would eat it twice a day if I could, and I've heard that heart is like really, super-beefy beef. I just don't know how to prepare it. Any ideas?
    I do them quite often. I try and get the veins cut out and then I make stuffing using Pepridge Farms as directed and stuff it. and bake at 350 for about 45 to 50 minutes.

  3. #53
    Senior Member patsyo56721's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    Sorry, I'd make him cook it and eat it himself. Yuck. Tell him to bring you Filet Minon next time:>
    I prefer it to Filet Minon.

  4. #54
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    My only experience is with chicken hearts, which we cook with the soup. Yum.

  5. #55
    Super Member gmaybee's Avatar
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    It makes the best Coney Sauce for hotdogs.

  6. #56
    Super Member kathymarie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SparkMonkey
    A few days ago my boyfriend brought home a whole beef heart. He is extremely excited about it. I'm willing to try it, but I can't exactly say I'm chomping at the bit to get at it. I do like beef and would eat it twice a day if I could, and I've heard that heart is like really, super-beefy beef. I just don't know how to prepare it. Any ideas?
    ...per your title....WHY IN THE WORLD WOULD YOU COOK A HEART?...all joking aside....I wonder if it's like chicken hearts...I don't mind the taste but hate the texture....good luck....sorry no help from me... :XD:

  7. #57
    Super Member MellieKQuilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SparkMonkey
    A few days ago my boyfriend brought home a whole beef heart. He is extremely excited about it. I'm willing to try it, but I can't exactly say I'm chomping at the bit to get at it. I do like beef and would eat it twice a day if I could, and I've heard that heart is like really, super-beefy beef. I just don't know how to prepare it. Any ideas?
    So? How did you cook it and what did you think? Inquiring minds want to know! :lol:

  8. #58
    Senior Member SparkMonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MellieKQuilter
    Quote Originally Posted by SparkMonkey
    A few days ago my boyfriend brought home a whole beef heart. He is extremely excited about it. I'm willing to try it, but I can't exactly say I'm chomping at the bit to get at it. I do like beef and would eat it twice a day if I could, and I've heard that heart is like really, super-beefy beef. I just don't know how to prepare it. Any ideas?
    So? How did you cook it and what did you think? Inquiring minds want to know! :lol:
    It's in the freezer, awaiting colder weather. From what I've gathered, it makes a pretty hearty dish (pun completely, totally intended :lol: :lol: ). I think it'll be a little too heavy for summer weather, but we're looking forward to it on the first blustery October day. :)

  9. #59
    Super Member MellieKQuilter's Avatar
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    Ahh, gotcha. :)

  10. #60
    Super Member starshine's Avatar
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    Just came across your post...I used to buy it at the grocery store and have them grind it as hamburger is ground. I would then mix it with regular ground beef and make hamburgers, or any dish ground beef was used. It was good and would make the regular i.e. cheapest ground beef much leaner and it was cheaper than the ground beef (Back then about 25 years ago. Not sure if it is still cheaper. If you have a food processor or a meat grinder you could grind it yourself.

  11. #61
    Senior Member denise d's Avatar
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    If you like chili... make beef heart chili.

    I usually get a 1/4 a cow a year, including parts.

    Tails are my favorite, but I do like to to make beef heart chili. I cube it a bit smaller than stew meat and it makes a fabulous dish.

    Enjoy it... the weather should be getting cooler starting tonight.

  12. #62
    Senior Member SparkMonkey's Avatar
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    If anyone's still curious about this, we cooked up the heart as our contribution for my fiance's family Thanksgiving. His brother and dad had expressed interest in trying the heart.

    We cleaned it, cubed it, and cooked it overnight in the crockpot (about 8 hours) with a couple glasses of dry red wine, some Worcestershire sauce, garlic, onion, salt, pepper, and a touch of hot sauce. It smelled amaaaaazing while it cooked (it even woke me up, it smelled so good!) and it tasted just as good. I was so pleased with how it turned out! I wish it were a little easier to find, because it's pretty cheap (it was from a local farm and I think it cost $2/lb). Anyway, that's how we did it, and it was a success.
    A heaping helping of Primordial Soup
    http://neyarnderthal.wordpress.com

  13. #63
    Junior Member bigbrownowl's Avatar
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    I don't usually eat Beef heart, but we eat Lambs hearts reguarly (my kids love them). I take out all the pipes and sinews with a pair of kitchen scissors, and create a large cavity. I stuff it with a homemade breadcrumb-based stuffing (finely chopped onion, breadcrumbs, suet, egg to bind, herbs and seasoning) and roast in the oven for about 30-40 minutes. I then slice them and serve as a roast. I also put them into my cookpot. I prepare them in the same way, but don't stuff them. Add a red wine stock, and we also add whole peeled pickling onions (small shallots) and mushrooms. Cook in the pot until tender (I give them about 3 hours). Slice them and serve.

    I find placing a whole heart on a plate puts some people off. Slicing them through is a nicer way to serve them. Try Lambs hearts if you can get them - they have a very delicate flavour. Avoid Pigs hearts unless you really like them, as they have a very strong - some would call overpowering - flavour.

  14. #64
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    Missing an Ingredient ? UKFoodOnline.co.uk



    Roast Stuffed Lambs' Hearts HT MC 120mins

    Serves 4 Hot Offal Vegetables Nuts Herbs Main course Gluten Wheat Free Eggless



    Ingredients

    50g/2oz Button Mushrooms, chopped

    2 Sticks Celery, chopped

    25g/2oz Butter

    25g/1oz Walnuts, chopped

    1 tbsp Fresh Parsley, chopped

    Salt and Pepper

    4 Lambs' Hearts

    2 tbsp Oil



    Instructions



    1. Melt the butter in pan, add the mushrooms and celery and fry for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add breadcrumbs, walnuts, parsley and seasoning. Mix well and leave to cool.



    2. Preheat the oven to 180C, 350F Gas mark 4. Prepare hearts, using kitchen scissors to cut through the pockets inside to make room for the stuffing. Wash and dry well.



    3. Stuff the hearts with the mushroom mixture and sew up with a trussing needle and thread, or fasten with skewers.



    4. Melt the oil in a roasting tin and add hearts. Baste well and cook in the centre of the oven for 45 minutes. Turn hearts over and baste. Cook for a further 45 minutes until tender.



    5. To serve - remove the string or skewers and serve immediately.

  15. #65
    Junior Member bigbrownowl's Avatar
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    Oh Mayday - we are DEFINITELY on the same wavelength!

    I like the idea of the stuffing made with mushrooms and walnuts: I must try this one out.

  16. #66
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    My mother use to cook hearts 50 years ago. Rememer they are mostly mussle, so she cut up onion, celery, salt, pepper and covered the heart over with water, then cooking it for several hours until tender, then cut it like turkey breast. She made a gravy out of the water/veggie mix to pour over it. mmmmm was really good.

  17. #67
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    Put it in the freezer for a while until it starts to firm up. Slice it, roll it in a flour-salt-pepper mix and brown in hot shortening. then cook slower and keep turning in the pan. My dad always added water to steam it, but the browning first made sort of a carmelized coating. That is the way he made any chicken-fried steak (or even our turkey breast cut up and fried). Use the drippings and water from boiled potatoes to make gravy for the meat and mashed potatoes. I'd still rather have the chicken fried heart than steak!

  18. #68
    Super Member May in Jersey's Avatar
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    My Goodness, I didn't think so many people ate beef heart. My father liked to eat beef hearts and tongues, kidneys, tribe, sheep's heads breaded and baked, yuck. My grandfather loved headcheese and pigs feet, those I could eat if I really had to. Mind you we weren't farm people but lived in the big city. I'm sticking to a hamburger or steak, May in Jersey

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