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Thread: Meat Broth

  1. #1
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    Meat Broth

    I’m a big saver (hoarder) of broth because it’s so flavorful. I strain it, refrigerate it, then grease comes to top so I can skim it off. I put it in glass jars but - this is important part - Only fill 3/4 full otherwise expansion Will Crack The Glass. I use reuseable plastic screw on lids (sold at hardware store) & freeze. When I need broth, remove plastic lid, microwave a frozen quart jar of broth about 4 minutes and it’s almost all liquid and ready to use. Use it this way or simmer uncovered to condense it.

    Ive got DD doing this and she’s amazed at the perfectly good broth she’s been throwing away.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 02-05-2018 at 03:20 AM. Reason: remove shouting/all caps

  2. #2
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    What a great idea. I'll save on buying it. I already do this with chicken. Thanks ��
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    I agree...you can save so much money by making broth yourself. I do this with vegetable scraps to make a rich, vegetable both. I keep it in jars in the fridge and use it in place of oil, or fats to saute things in. It gives a great taste, plus it's FREE!

    ~ C

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    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I condense the broths, freeze in ice cube rays, then transfer to gallon zipper bags in a flat layer for stacking in the freezer.
    Each meat has its own zipper bag. Doing it this way I can add a cube or two to lots of dishes, especially vegetables. Yum!
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

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    How do you make meat broth? I've never heard of this, but it's definitely something I'd like to do.

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    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    My husband makes his own bone broth and it's wonderful and so healthy! We like chicken the best.

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    If I do a beef or pork roast, I do save the broth but not for too long. I skim off the fat and use it with leftover meat for curried rice. I also use the leftover roast and broth for vegetable soup sometimes. I just use the OXO chicken packages for a base for cream of potato, broccoli or cauliflower soup.

  8. #8
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    I love this idea and do the same thing with vegetable liquid. I use it in place of water in soup recipes. I saved some broth from a corned beef once and used it when I made ham and bean soup. It was the best ever!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    If I do a beef or pork roast, I do save the broth but not for too long. I skim off the fat and use it with leftover meat for curried rice. I also use the leftover roast and broth for vegetable soup sometimes. I just use the OXO chicken packages for a base for cream of potato, broccoli or cauliflower soup.
    No need to skim off the fat. Fat is good for you; your brain needs fat.
    I simmered left over chicken bones for about two days, and the bones got so tender I could crush them with my fingers. I put all this into the blender and had some wonderful broth. Then I cooked one cup of brown rice with three cups of the broth. Delicious.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

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    If you eat a lot of mushrooms, save the stems in a bag in the freezer. They make amazing broth!

    ~ C

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    Quote Originally Posted by maviskw View Post
    No need to skim off the fat. Fat is good for you; your brain needs fat.
    I simmered left over chicken bones for about two days, and the bones got so tender I could crush them with my fingers. I put all this into the blender and had some wonderful broth. Then I cooked one cup of brown rice with three cups of the broth. Delicious.
    I have just learned that back in the day before insulin shots, the doctor's cured diabetes by adding fat to the diet, and low carbs. They probably didn't call them carbs, but they eliminated sugar and refined foods, etc. Now I eat the fat too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by maviskw View Post
    No need to skim off the fat. Fat is good for you; your brain needs fat.
    I simmered left over chicken bones for about two days, and the bones got so tender I could crush them with my fingers. I put all this into the blender and had some wonderful broth. Then I cooked one cup of brown rice with three cups of the broth. Delicious.
    i agree we need the fat. I should have said I remove SOME of the fat. I save bacon grease and use just a little to fry eggs or in cooking.

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    “The Everlasting Meal” by Tamar Adler is really a good book. She doesn’t throw much food away.

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    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I do too. I also save cooking water and vegetable scraps. I blenderize the scraps and make vegetable broth that way.
    Anna Quilts

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    I am interested in this, especially since I just purchased a freezer and would have a place to put the jars.

    But I have no idea how to make the broth.

    Any information will be appreciated.

  16. #16
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    JanieH asked how to make broth.
    I just use the liquid from a roast pork or beef. Pour it into a container or fruit jar. If I don't have enough to use with noodles, ect, I add a Bouillion Cube and a cup of water for each bouillion cube. You never taste the difference in the actual broth and that from the Boullion Cube.

    It really does save money. At T.Giving, I just use the broth from the turkey for gravy and turkey and noodles. The broth is $2.00 or so, so---- free money!!
    Mariah
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    To make stock/broth:
    Roast soup bone (beef) in large roasting pan in oven at 400° about 1 hour or till it smells wonderful. Then turn heat down to 225° and add water to pan to cover beef bones. Bake 2 - 3 hours or till everything falls apart. Cool slightly; remove bones with slotted spoon to large platter. Pour liquid into large clear pitcher/large dutch oven - reserving last bits of solids, whatever isn't clear. Cool stock till fat solidifies then remove fat and discard. Reheat stock if it has jelled (which is a very good thing) and pour into freezer jars, cover, date and freeze till needed. (If I've got limited freezer space, I reheat in pan and reduce to about 1/3 it's volume and freeze in smaller portions. When I use that I can add water as needed. Meanwhile, separate meat from bones and pack into freezer containers in useable portions and cover with stock. Place on lids and freeze. (OR place meat into casserole, add 3-4 tablespoons barley. Cover with stock pan remains and additional stock (to just cover). Bake at 225° about 2 hours and serve with potatoes and vegetables for supper. Very tasty.)
    GrannyLady - Having too much fun dressing my grandaughters.

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    SuzzyQ, thank you for those directions. I can't wait to try making my own stock.

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    REMINDER FOR FREEZING IN JARS.
    Glass jars are wonderful but don’t fill more than 75% full or it may crack your jar when in the freezer.

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    Regarding the rendering of the meat bones...Why in oven, can't this work in pot on stove top....

    tranum - you said you simmered for two days...did you refrigerate overnite or continually keep on stove? And then you blended - including the bones?

    veggie broth from scraps...does that mean the peeling/trimmings of fresh veggies..like beet tops, asparagus ends, cauliflower, cabbage leaves, etc?
    Last edited by Geri B; 02-14-2018 at 04:31 AM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    Regarding the rendering of the meat bones...Why in oven, can't this work in pot on stove top....

    tranum - you said you simmered for two days...did you refrigerate overnite or continually keep on stove? And then you blended - including the bones?

    veggie broth from scraps...does that mean the peeling/trimmings of fresh veggies..like beet tops, asparagus ends, cauliflower, cabbage leaves, etc?
    it was maviskw that simmered broth two days, not me.
    As for vegetable broth, yes I’v used clean trimmings & peelings. You really should read Tamar Adler’s book, it’s interesting.
    Roasting meat bones in the oven gives a “roasted flavor” (draws flavor out of the bones) but a pot on the stove works too, you’ll just give up the roasted flavor. I agree with someone here on simmering broth before storing to condense the flavor. Experiment with it, it’s just drippings, bones and peelings you were tossing anyway, right ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by maviskw View Post
    I simmered left over chicken bones for about two days, and the bones got so tender I could crush them with my fingers.
    I did something similar a couple of weeks ago with a turkey. I bought some leftover fresh turkeys after Thanksgiving and froze for dog food. I pulled one out and cooked part in the slow cooker and part in a stock pot (didn't have a pot big enough for the whole thing). To make sure everything was well cooked, I let it simmer on very low overnight. I deboned and chopped the meat and froze in zip locks. Then, I added some vegetables and made some bone broth with the liquid and the bones which I cooked for about 24 hours.

    By the second day, I was so sick of smelling it, I swore never to do it again.

    Does anyone have a solution to the prolonged smell of making bone broth?

    bkay

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    Quote Originally Posted by bkay View Post
    I did something similar a couple of weeks ago with a turkey. I bought some leftover fresh turkeys after Thanksgiving and froze for dog food. I pulled one out and cooked part in the slow cooker and part in a stock pot (didn't have a pot big enough for the whole thing). To make sure everything was well cooked, I let it simmer on very low overnight. I deboned and chopped the meat and froze in zip locks. Then, I added some vegetables and made some bone broth with the liquid and the bones which I cooked for about 24 hours.

    By the second day, I was so sick of smelling it, I swore never to do it again.

    Does anyone have a solution to the prolonged smell of making bone broth?

    bkay
    Will it work to put the slow cooker in the garage ? That’s where I fry bacon.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkay View Post
    I did something similar a couple of weeks ago with a turkey. I bought some leftover fresh turkeys after Thanksgiving and froze for dog food. I pulled one out and cooked part in the slow cooker and part in a stock pot (didn't have a pot big enough for the whole thing). To make sure everything was well cooked, I let it simmer on very low overnight. I deboned and chopped the meat and froze in zip locks. Then, I added some vegetables and made some bone broth with the liquid and the bones which I cooked for about 24 hours.

    By the second day, I was so sick of smelling it, I swore never to do it again.

    Does anyone have a solution to the prolonged smell of making bone broth?

    bkay
    Use and Instant Pot...much, much quicker! (but the bone broth is just as good!)
    Life happens...and we react...

  25. #25
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    would burning a candle take care of the smell?
    seems to work for a lot of things.
    It is a blessing, to be a blessing !
    ~Quilters are warm people!!!~
    cheese brings parties together

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