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Thread: Niffles????

  1. #26
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    My DH's German Grandmother used to make something she and the family called 'gershnoggels". They were small, dumpling type balls, made with cold mashed potatoes, flour, butter/lard, salt and pepper and dropped into boiling water and cooked until they floated. Not sure of the proportions. There seems to be many members familiar with German recipes. Ring any bells??

  2. #27
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    If you had trouble finding the recipe with that spelling, it's because it has a silent "k" at the beginning. Kniffles and spaezle are the same. Sure sounds yummy either way.
    “You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” ~Maya Angelou.

  3. #28
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    Hello Cindyb,
    I grew up with Niffl"i"es. If you google Nifflies with the "I" you will find some hits.
    My grandparents were Slovak (grandmother near Vienna), and she make Nifflies often.
    As you know from others, they can be make a day before, and they will be delicious.
    (Just don't cook them too long, or they will be a bit tough).
    Bellevue20 (central Michigan)

  4. #29
    Junior Member Cheshirepat's Avatar
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    ...And in Hungarian cooking they are called 'nokedli' - yum! I don't think Grannie's comment was meant to poke fun of anyone's heritage or language. Personally I think 'nokedli' sounds a bit silly to my American ears, but I'm still a proud 1/2 Hungarian.

    Mmm, need to make some soon!
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  5. #30
    Senior Member Scraps's Avatar
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    Practice with a few ahead of time & see what works :-). I make niffles, but just pushed batter off the end of a teaspoon. I am also from MI & had a German mother in law who made spaetzle/niffles.



    Quote Originally Posted by cindyb View Post
    Has anyone made 'niffles'? It is passed down from my husbands German family and we love them. It's a type of noodle- pasta that you use a grater like contraption, slide it back and forth over boiling water.
    My question is, we would like to make them the day before and take them for Christmas. But, has anyone re-warmed something like this? I'm wondering if I should once again bring water to a boil and drop them in again (even tho they are cooked) or microwave them. Either way, I'm afraid of them becoming tough.

  6. #31
    Super Member canmitch1971's Avatar
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    My Mother in law made nokedli. My husband’s family come from Hungary.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheshirepat View Post
    ...And in Hungarian cooking they are called 'nokedli' - yum! I don't think Grannie's comment was meant to poke fun of anyone's heritage or language. Personally I think 'nokedli' sounds a bit silly to my American ears, but I'm still a proud 1/2 Hungarian.

    Mmm, need to make some soon!
    Besides my family, my pets are the most important things to me. I have had birds, a dog or cats since I was about 8 years old. The cruelest thing you can do to me is take my animals away.

  7. #32
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    We call them spaetzle also. I have made them and kept them warm in a crockpot (using a generous amount of butter ). I suppose you could make up ahead of time then and reheat in a crockpot. Maybe do a trial run with a small batch and see if you like the result?

  8. #33
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    I originally asked this question back in 2014 and I am so happy to see it coming up again. With Christmas right around the corner I'm thinking about them again. I love the idea of reheating them in a crockpot. Thanks everyone.

  9. #34
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    Trying to think what I Can use instead of buying another gadget. The noodles are probably delicious.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 12-13-2018 at 07:47 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  10. #35
    Junior Member ladyinpurple135's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lclang View Post
    I believe these are called rivels. They are made from a very soft noodle like dough and there is a special tool to push the dough through and drop it into water or broth. You can also squish it through a colander, a slotted spoon, a larger opening strainer, etc. They cook very quickly and add good texture to soups.
    Yes, these are called rivels and my grandmother made them. She would work everything through her fingers and was an expert at making them. BTW- just in case this is a local name, I’m originally from York, PA and have almost total German heritage.

    Thanks, Sandy

  11. #36
    Junior Member ladyinpurple135's Avatar
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    Spaetzle is a bit different than rivels as rivels are fine and the spaetzle are a little thicker. At least they are in my family. Haven’t had them in years as we “younger” generation never learned how to make them (I’m 71).

  12. #37
    Senior Member Monale's Avatar
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    In Switzerland, they are called Chnöpfli. They work well for making ahead. You can freeze them, too (spread out on a cookie sheet until they are frozen and then in a zip lock bag). My favourite way of heating them up again is by frying them lightly in some butter.

  13. #38
    Senior Member Monale's Avatar
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    Spätzle are made slightly different here, not by pressing them through holes but by cutting the dough off with a knife or spatula from a board. Hence Spätzle are more longish, Chnöpfli tend to be more roundish and shorter.

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