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Thread: Piecrust woes

  1. #1
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    Piecrust woes

    First, let me say that I've never been able to master the art of making a decent piecrust. Never. And I've tried all through my married life. So when Pillsbury developed pre-rolled piecrust, I rejoiced. But even there, I have problems. While I don't have to worry about rolling it out and scraping the results off my counter to a pie plate, I can't seem to get the bottom crust to bake properly. It always seems undercooked no matter what kind of pie it is.

    I place them on the center rack and use the right temperature, so what am I doing wrong? In my own defense, the turkey and side dishes were all great, so it's not that I'm a lousy cook in general. Help.

  2. #2
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    Try setting your pie on a pizza/bread stone to bake. Or, bake the pie on a lower oven rack.

  3. #3
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    Do you Perheat the oven frist ...I have a Pie Crust recipe that has never fail me yet been making them for yrs.If you would like it just give me a holler

  4. #4
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    I have made many a pie in my day and I use the ratio of 2 cups all-purpose flour to a 2/3 cup Crisco for one 2 crust pie or 2 pie shells. I use a pastry blender to cut the shortening into the flour until it looks like oatmeal. I add enough cold water to form it into 2 balls. Try not to overwork your dough as it makes it tough.
    You can replace some water with vodka for an even flakier crust at a 1:1 ratio. Refrigerating empty pie shells also helps for a flakier crust. I roll out my pie crust on a piece of floured WAX PAPER to make it easier to pick it up and get into the pie plate. Start cooking your pie at 400* for 10 minutes and then turn the oven down for the rest of the cooking time. Try making pies again when it isn't a special occasion and you will probably have more luck. CONGRATULATIONS on a perfect turkey because that is the star attraction after all.

  5. #5
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    I bake pies in the lower third of the oven, not the centre. That helps the bottom crust to brown.

    I also preheat the over to 400 degrees and bake it at that temp for about 15 minutes then lower the temp to 350 or so and finish baking it.

    If you butter the bottom crust before adding the filling it will help to avoid a soggy crust that soaks up all the liquid too.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  6. #6
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    When I bake pumpkin pies, the crust is never crisp; I always thought that was how they were supposed to be and have enjoyed many of them over the years.

  7. #7
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    I use a glass pie plate and can actually see what is going on underneath. Different pans cook the crusts in different ways.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgeskine View Post
    When I bake pumpkin pies, the crust is never crisp; I always thought that was how they were supposed to be and have enjoyed many of them over the years.
    Prebake your pie crust for a few minutes before putting the filling in - that will eliminate the soggy crust syndrome

  9. #9
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
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    I use a stoneware pie pan. It cooks evenly from the edge to the middle. Last summer I practiced and practiced until my dear SIL told me I had mastered the pie crust.

  10. #10
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    The simpliest recipe I've ever found is my mama's No Fail Piecrust. All you need is 1 stick butter melted. 1 and 1/4 cups all purpose flour. (if you can find WR Flour, it is the best) simply mix it with a fork and them press it into your pie pan with your fingers. WAAALAAA! Great crust !! I use Blue Bonnet margarine and I melt it in the microwave in the pieplate I am going to use. Soooooo easy!
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  11. #11
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I have made many a pie in my day and I use the ratio of 2 cups all-purpose flour to a 2/3 cup Crisco for one 2 crust pie or 2 pie shells. I use a pastry blender to cut the shortening into the flour until it looks like oatmeal. I add enough cold water to form it into 2 balls. Try not to overwork your dough as it makes it tough.
    You can replace some water with vodka for an even flakier crust at a 1:1 ratio. Refrigerating empty pie shells also helps for a flakier crust. I roll out my pie crust on a piece of floured WAX PAPER to make it easier to pick it up and get into the pie plate. Start cooking your pie at 400* for 10 minutes and then turn the oven down for the rest of the cooking time. Try making pies again when it isn't a special occasion and you will probably have more luck. CONGRATULATIONS on a perfect turkey because that is the star attraction after all.

    Thanks Tartan!! I'm keeping this one to try too!
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  12. #12
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    I have found that glass or the darker metal pie crust pans work the best.....I even use the middle rack! Lots of good suggestions !!!!

  13. #13
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    I use the same recipe for crust that my mom used. 3 c. flour, 1 c. shortening(my mom always used lard but I can't bring myself to do that so I use crisco) a pinch of baking powder and a t. salt. I use my food processer and ice water. I refrigerate it for about 15 min. and roll it between saran wrap so as not to add flour. Flour will make a tough crust....My pie crust is always flakey and tender....I always put the pan on a cookie sheet to bake....

  14. #14
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    Wow, lots of great tips from expert pie bakers. Thanks. I guess hubby is going to have a lot of pies to sample in the next few months. But I don't think he'll mind. The irony is I can't even eat any of them. I have to be on a gluten free diet so I have to look for recipes using GF flour, which will make baking my pies even more challenging.

    But if you have any more tips for me, let me know. And thanks again.

  15. #15
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    I have used the Crisco pie crust recipe for over 50 years (yup, I'm old, but I started baking at 10), and it never fails. The most important thing to remember is that EVERYTHING must be cold, the shortening too, and ALWAYS USE ICE WATER. My sister taught me that trick about ice water, and she won many ribbons demonstrating making pie crust in 4-H. Hope this helps.

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    For years I have had the same problem with soggy bottom crusts. I have resolved that problem by placing a pizza pan that has holes all over it into the oven when I start prehearing it. It never fails.
    Ronee

  17. #17
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    I have resolved the soggy bottom crust by placing a pizza pan that has holes all over it into the oven when I start preheating the oven. When the over is hot I place the uncooked pie on the heated pizza pan and I no longer have soggy crusts.
    Ronee

  18. #18
    Senior Member ShabbyTabby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by #1piecemaker View Post
    The simpliest recipe I've ever found is my mama's No Fail Piecrust. All you need is 1 stick butter melted. 1 and 1/4 cups all purpose flour. (if you can find WR Flour, it is the best) simply mix it with a fork and them press it into your pie pan with your fingers. WAAALAAA! Great crust !! I use Blue Bonnet margarine and I melt it in the microwave in the pieplate I am going to use. Soooooo easy!


    Wow this sounds like my kind of pie crust....I have never been able to make a decent pie crust but sure am gonna give this a try...Thanks for sharing.
    Families are like old quilts....although they tend to unravel at times...each can be stitched back together with love.

  19. #19
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    I have a recipe for a never fail crust . You can mix it by hand right in the pie pan and press it up on the sides. If you want a top crust mix the ingredients and then place between 2 sheets of was paper and roll out.

    1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup of oil ( I use canola oil )
    3 Tablespoons of milk ( I use 1/2 & 1/2 )
    This is a very flakey crust and taste like the old fashion lard crust that Grandma used to make.

    Hope some of you try this and let me know how it turned out.
    Everyone that taste it can't believe it was that easy.

  20. #20
    Super Member Butterflyblue's Avatar
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    I'm not an expert pie maker, by any means (which is why the piecrust recipe in my Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook is violently x-ed out). I just this year really got decent at making a crust. But I always use a pyrex pan, and I've never had a problem with soggy bottom crust. And the recipe I found that works EVERY TIME for me is from the Pioneer Woman Cooks blog. It's very flaky, and can stand more overworking than most, which is important for any piecrust I'm going to make.

    http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2...p-p-p-perfect/

  21. #21
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    This is the recipe I used for our apple pie. I used a stick of butter from our freezer and cut it up. First I mixed all the dry ingredients in my food processor, then dropped the butter slices in and pulse it until it was mealy in texture. Then, I added a tablespoon of ice water from our fridge until it came together in a ball, wrapped it and put it in the fridge for 30 minutes. It rolled out nicely.

    2 cups all-purpose flour
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 stick of cold butter
    4 to 5 tablespoons cold water

    I used this for the top crust since DH had purchased a frozen pie crust in its aluminum foil pan.

    Occasionally I have sprinkled flour across inside bottom crust so as not to have a soggy bottom crust.

    Joyce D: I haven't ever made a gluten free pie crust but here is a recipe for one.
    http://www.landolakes.com/recipe/3071/pie-crust-gluten-free-recipe

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  22. #22
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Well, I used the "No Fail" pie crust recipe when I was first married an eon ago. It failed. So, since then, I just buy the crusts that come rolled in the box, let them warm up to room temperature, roll them out a little bit more, and viola! Excellent crust! No dirty dishes to clean. No stress about whether I held my tongue just right while cutting in the shortening. So when someone asks if I made the pie, honest answer is yes. If I made the crust, I answer, I baked it. I'd rather be sewing or sitting outside enjoying the breeze. But kudos to all of you who perfected the crust! :-)
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  23. #23
    Senior Member petpainter's Avatar
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    Pie crust

    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflyblue View Post
    I'm not an expert pie maker, by any means (which is why the piecrust recipe in my Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook is violently x-ed out). I just this year really got decent at making a crust. But I always use a pyrex pan, and I've never had a problem with soggy bottom crust. And the recipe I found that works EVERY TIME for me is from the Pioneer Woman Cooks blog. It's very flaky, and can stand more overworking than most, which is important for any piecrust I'm going to make.

    http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2...p-p-p-perfect/
    OMG!!!! This is the EXACT way I make my pie crust!!! My favorite Aunt that passed away taught it to me years ago, and it's the only way I've ever made pie crust. Even down to using the spatula to help put it into the plate and folding the edges under. I call it my secret as I won't give it out and people call it award winning. Cool to see it on the board! I recommend it, but you do have to handle it carefully when putting it into the plate. Never any problems with baking or soggy bottoms either!

  24. #24
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    I have great luck with the Amish style piecrust (using egg and vinegar). It freezes well, so I usually make a good sized batch, shape it in patties, wrap in wax paper and freeze them. However, if I'm in a crunch, I use frozen, but only Marie Callendar's. They are the best -- flaky and not tough. One more thought -- if you use a Tuperware pie crust mat with a small amount of flour, you probably won't have any problem with them sticking to your counter -- and it's much easier to clean up.

  25. #25
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    Yes, send us the recipe. I'm getting hungrier for pie by the minute!

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