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Question about yeast in breadmaking

Question about yeast in breadmaking

Old 10-03-2021, 12:36 PM
  #21  
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I would go with salt being the problem especially if you know your yeast was good.
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Old 10-03-2021, 01:22 PM
  #22  
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Susie...I had to go look up a proofing basket. That was new to me. I am learning too much about making fresh bread. Darn it!!! Now I'm thinking about hot, homemade bread and really wanting to try my hand at it again. My first try was liked by hubby but it was too grainy and gummy to me. Taste and texture have to be right for me to like the bread. I am keeping my eye on this thread. Might be another attempt at bread making in my future. Looks like I might need the proofing trays. Suzie, the ones on Ebay look like the real thing. A new set of them is $149 on one website. I like the fact that it is all ready to bake after it is proofed and doesn't have to be moved. Until them, I guess locally made French bread will have to be my favorite to eat.
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Old 10-03-2021, 02:27 PM
  #23  
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Barb, my husband has been making bread all weekend lololol!!!
Oh no, what have I started?

As I said my brother makes bread in a dutch oven. He makes great Italian bread.
Columbus is such a big city but I swear nobody makes good bread. So we are on our adventure
I love kneading bread. It's so relaxing for me.

That link I posted on ebay looks interesting.

I really appreciate all the people who chimed in.
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Old 10-03-2021, 05:17 PM
  #24  
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Growing up on a farm, we always made our own bread. I didn't know there was "store bread" until I went to school. We lived with my grandparents until I was 4-1/2; Grandma won a lot of ribbons for her breads, donuts and cookies. The only thing I didn't like was her Saucijzen - sausage baked in a yeasty roll.

For years, I didn't bake much bread; my husband prefers Italian with a crunchy crust. The thing I baked most was cinnamon raisin bread, as my brother loves it.

FF a few years... I mentioned learning to make artisan bread to our daughter after I retired. She enrolled me in an artisan sourdough class at a local bakery. Holy cow... Sourdough is so much harder than yeast, lol. I've gotten the hang of it, have starter in the refrigerator and dried as a backup. Mostly I do a ciabatta, but really, still don't bake much. There are only 2 of us here to eat it!
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Old 10-04-2021, 03:20 AM
  #25  
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I am following this thread with great interest. Lots of great ideas and experience here.

For the last 15 years I have been baking my own bread most of the time except when it gets to hot to bake, in the summer. I started kneading the dough by hand years before that.. Then with my aging hands,I boughtt a bread making machine for the kneading part and I baked it in a conventional oven.

My bread making machine died a few months ago so now I am learning to do it using a stand mixer.
I also make a mixed sourdough starter meaning that I add may be 1/2 tsp of dry yeast to it, I leave it alone for 24 hours before I make my bread with it.
I mix the salt very well with the flour then I add another 1/2 tsp of yeast on top, before I add the whole mixture to the liquid. and start mixing in the stand mixer. I 've had no problem so far proceeding that way. I figure that if, with a bread making machine I proceeded that way, adding the yeast on top of the flour, it would do well. I let it raise a little longer, may be 1/2 hr more.

Now, I would like to find a way to bake it in the morning after having the dough rise overnight in the fridge . I heard it can be done so if any of you have used this method I would be interested to hear about it.

Last edited by helou; 10-04-2021 at 03:22 AM.
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Old 10-04-2021, 03:51 AM
  #26  
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That is the right pan set. The extra trays are for bagels, muffins and such. I've never used them. LOL
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Old 10-04-2021, 05:10 AM
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OnebyOne...I love those steam baking pans! I'll bet the crust comes out nice and crispy.
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Old 10-04-2021, 05:13 AM
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I have a baguette pan, that I got about 30 years ago. It helps to keep that nice shape while the bread is baking in the oven. I have to put a pan of hot water on the floor of the oven if I want steam.

Now days, I use a small Dutch oven to bake my bread. It's so easy and the loaf impresses my DH.
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Old 10-04-2021, 05:13 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
That is the right pan set. The extra trays are for bagels, muffins and such. I've never used them. LOL
They have the "make offer" button. Maybe I'll try to get them. Thanks for checking them out.
More toys for my husband LOL
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Old 10-04-2021, 05:21 AM
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helou...I usually take 2 days to make bread. The first day is for allowing the sourdough starter to inoculate the dough and the second day is for letting it rise and bake. Letting it rise in the fridge overnight is a good idea. I've done that many times. The cold will slow down the rising, so that it doesn't rise too much and then collapse before morning comes. It is just finding room in the fridge for that big pan of bread that is the hard part.
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