Roux

Old 09-25-2020, 10:46 AM
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My family is not from the south, but boy, did my Grandma know her rouxs. For those of you not familiar with roux, it is basically the foundation for making white sauce, gravies, souffles, etc. Flour is mixed with a fat, (usually butter, oil, bacon fat, or lard,) and then cooked slowly, until the flour is, "cooked," and the mixture becomes a smooth paste. From there, it can be used to thicken many kinds of sauces, or as a foundation for souffles and some types of pastry dough. I'm sure that there are more uses for it, if I think hard enough.

Grandma had different rouxs for different recipes. The roux for white sauce was light and only slightly done, while her turkey gravy required a dark, nutty roux that had been cooked for awhile over a low burner. If it was constantly stirred, the gravy came out deep brown and silky smooth, with not a lump in sight. She always used the turkey drippings for the fat element and the brown bits for color and flavor.

What do you use roux for?
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Old 09-25-2020, 12:49 PM
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Gumbo's, of course ( my hubby's conversation w/ New Irleans banker abt my La. chix stew was told "Ah, but she doesn't make a true roux".) HA! It is slowly cooked to the color of a brn paper sack..lol. I start my potato soup with a roux, my cheese sauces, gravies, etc. like your granny, I have different colors for different needs. The slow cooking truly adds a deeper, richer flavor.
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Old 09-25-2020, 01:27 PM
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A mean chicken pot pie!

One stick of butter, melted, and then add 2/3 cup of flour is just the start of a perfect gravy for the pot pie. Mine are a favorite care package when a friend needs a hug.

PS: Ham gravy anyone made from the drippings and flour?
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Old 09-25-2020, 02:46 PM
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Ok, now I'm hungry! It's still waaaay too hot here to contemplate all these wonderful dishes, sadly. I end up using a quick Arrowroot/water paste to thicken when I'm in a rush, or it's a light dish, but do LOVE a proper roux! I'd love to know your 'mean' recipe, Rhonda - I've never cooked a pot pie yet! I've done a Shepherd's Pie, but not that.
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Old 09-25-2020, 03:45 PM
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We lived in south Louisiana for over 40 years until
recently. The food is fabulous there. We went to a home expo many years ago and Enola Prudhomme was doing a demo on “dry roux” to make it healthier. Mr stitchnripper was intrigued and made it to use in his gumbo. He isn’t from the south and isn’t really a cook but he does make nice gumbo. There’s a Cajun meat market here so we can get what he needs. They also sell jars of dry roux. It does have a nice taste.
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Old 09-25-2020, 03:49 PM
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Bechamel sauce for croque madame sandwiches.
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Old 09-25-2020, 03:58 PM
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I was really "old" before I learned that fat and starch cooked together was "roux"
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Old 09-25-2020, 04:37 PM
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I like to thicken with cornstarch rather then flour so no roux for me.
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Old 09-25-2020, 05:02 PM
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I start my gumbos with a roux. Don’t really use it for anything else.
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Old 09-26-2020, 03:26 AM
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Gumbo, gravy, anything with a sauce. Have you seen Kevin Belton's brown flour? He bakes it in the oven, so it is prebrowned and cooked already. Love it. He is a chef with a show on PBS here in Florida. I think the name of the show is Kevin Belton's New Orleans Celebrations.
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