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Thread: What apples for an apply crisp?

  1. #1
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    What apples for an apply crisp?

    I make an apple crisp for the kids at holiday dinners and cheesecake for the adults. This year, I thought I'd like to have a little more juice in the apple crisp. So, I went online and found that Granny Smith apples were used for juicing. So, I added some of them. Big mistake. They did not get "juicey" just dry. Does anyone use a type of apple that bakes down and gets soft and juicy? I had used Red Delicious in the past and they were good, but I wanted a little more juicey.
    Penny

  2. #2
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    Golden delicious work well, McIntosh are good too. they do cook down and pieces don't hold their shape making the pie or whatever a bit "mushy" so that might be what you want

  3. #3
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    Golden Delicious do bake well and you can use less sugar because they are naturally sweeter. Macintosh or Ida Reds bake well too. I don’t use red delicious for baking.

  4. #4
    Senior Member jokir44's Avatar
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    When in doubt about the juiciness of fruit here is what I do. Put your fruit in a pan on top of the stove, all your spices and then a little of your thickening. Then cook it. You will see how much thickening you need and will be sure of your finished pie. I particularly do this with peach and blueberry pies.

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    I have never cared for Delicious apples, but do love Mcintosh, Rome, and just about any other that has a touch of tartness. Honeycrisp is very good.

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    I cook my apple fie filling on the stove if I'm not sure about my apples for pie. Just use the regular recipe and add 1/2 cup of water. Bring to boil and then simmer 15-20 minutes. Thicken with cornstarch slurry (2 tablespoons in 1/4 cup water) and then let cool a bit while you make and roll out your pastry. Never disappointed again!
    GrannyLady - Having too much fun dressing my grandaughters.

  7. #7
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    I do not make pies of any kind, because every time what I really make is a disaster. However, Granny Smith is my favorite apple pie apple. It makes a sweet-tart filling. Perhaps the apples you bought were old, maybe had a mealy texture?

    I do make apple pie filling on the stove top, though, in a similar manner as the one described by SuzzyQ. Served with ice cream, it is delicious.
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    I was told by an apple farmer - when choosing an apple, look at the flower end. If it is closed it still has all it's juice, if it is open then it is drying out. It made sense, at first I thought he was pulling my leg but since I use that method I haven't bought a bad apple since.

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    I like to use a mixture of apples when I make pie of apple crisp. For instance, I will buy one or two Granny Smiths, a Rome, a Jonathan or McIntosh and than a sweet one. For Thanksgiving, I used a Honey Crisp. I just like the subtle differences in the taste of the dessert. Of course, my husband adds vanilla ice cream to his.

  10. #10
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    I like McIntosh they are crisp and a little tart makes the best apple dish.

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    quiltingcandy, how interesting....I'm going to look from now on!

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    My basic rule for cooking with apples is the shape. If it's round, it's a cooking apple. If it's pointed (more like a tooth) it's an eating apple. Red Delicious is more tooth shaped, Granny Smith are more rounded.

    Of course, there are exceptions to every rule but this is a pretty good one for judging varieties you don't know well.

    Gravensteins make great applesauce because they just break down like that with very little effort Honeycrisp are delicious and not very pointed but have a high moisture content which is one of the reasons they don't store well and should be eaten around harvest time. I understand that they also grow quite large if left on their own, bigger than consumers really want.

    Opal is one of the newer eating varieties I rather like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elnan View Post
    I have never cared for Delicious apples, Honeycrisp is very good.
    Red Delicious and Golden Delicious are two very different kettles of fish. I have yet to meet the Red Delicious that I liked. They are really quite horrible. After about two chews you end up with a mouth full of straw. The only way I can eat them is with fruit dip.

    The Golden Delicious and really delicious and juicy for eating and are very good for cooking, too.

    But the best apple for a juicy pie is Wolf River. They were really prolific this year. Almost everyone who has a tree around here had difficultly find enough people to give apples to. I am very sad to see several bushels of the apples still hanging on the tree. I got at least 6 bushels myself. These apples are huge. One can weigh a pound and more. And they are late apples. They get sweeter only after a frost. This year it was 21 on a Sunday in October and we picked these apples the next Tuesday. I still have a few in the basement. Very few seed companies sell these but these are what I grew up with, so I try to get some in an apple year. They only have apples every other year.
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  14. #14
    Super Member Doggramma's Avatar
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    I've always used Granny Smith. My MIL always used Jonathons. I tried the Jonathons finally and they held their shape nicely, but I didn't use quite enough sugar and my pie was a little tart.
    Lori

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  15. #15
    Super Member tesspug's Avatar
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    Here in Washington we get a lot of Honeycrisp. Very juicy and they hold their shape well.
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    For eating I buy Gala.
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    Super Member luvstoquilt's Avatar
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    I always used Jonathan, Gala or Granny Smith apples. I can’t find Jonathan apples anymore and they were my favorites.
    "You must do the thing you think you cannot do"....E. Roosevelt

    Sharon
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doggramma View Post
    I didn't use quite enough sugar and my pie was a little tart.
    Extra sugar will not reduce tart. That's why there is always way too much sugar in a lemon pie. Tart is a taste you like or you don't like. If you don't really like it, I suppose the solution would be to use different apples.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingcandy View Post
    I was told by an apple farmer - when choosing an apple, look at the flower end. If it is closed it still has all it's juice, if it is open then it is drying out. It made sense, at first I thought he was pulling my leg but since I use that method I haven't bought a bad apple since.
    Great tip! It really makes sense.

    ~ C

  20. #20
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    I'm a McIntosh fan. That's my "secret" ingredient for apple pies.

  21. #21
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    I like Honeycrisp and Cortland.
    I'm not crazy about Ohio apples. I grew up in New York and they have awesome apples. I miss them.

  22. #22
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    My favorite is Cortland. I have never baked them, but they are juicy.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sallyflymi View Post
    I like McIntosh they are crisp and a little tart makes the best apple dish.
    Thank you. I like tart apples in baking. I usually just bake apples with a bit of seasoning and eat them with everything, yoghurt, etc.

  24. #24
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    I mix mine. Always some macs for the juiciness and mushiness, Wolf River or Spy for the tang and shape, Cortland, Rome, Jonathon, Jonagolds or golden Delicious for fillers. Ida Reds are a favorite. Not a fan of Honeycrisp and I dislike Red Delicious. I haven't cooked much with the newer ones - Pink Lady, etc.

  25. #25
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    We use Bramley apples all the time in the UK for cooking. Do you have these in America?

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