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Husqvarna Viking - rumor or?

Husqvarna Viking - rumor or?

Old 06-26-2018, 04:56 AM
  #21  
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I bought a Daisy 325 in 1999, one of the last years it was built in Sweden. Last year had an issue and parts are no longer available, even though it is still under the 20 year warranty...I bought an even older Pfaff to replace it. The late 80's Pfaff is a much better machine, I just hope the computer board never goes out.
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Old 06-26-2018, 11:27 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Ioftheneedle View Post
That the Diamond Deluxe was made in Sweden is good news to me. That is what I have since losing my Designer I in a tornado.
I'm sorry for the loss of your machine. Mine is down right now. I went to move it temporarily the other day, powered it off, unplugged it and moved it to the next room, plugged it in and now only part of it wants to come back on. The screen doesn't come on at all, the lights where the up/down, etc buttons are and up where the thread goes and the bottom where the stylus goes just flash. I tried changing it to a different outlet and still the same thing. The closest dealer is about 120 miles away now.
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Old 06-27-2018, 06:57 PM
  #23  
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There comes a time when ALL electronic machines become outdated & the industry has changed so much that repairs are neither cost-worthy nor appropriate. Which is soon followed by impossible. Idk why people accept that a computer is out-dated in 3 years...a TV in 4-5...kitchen appliances in 5-7, but they expect a sewing machines to last longer. Embrace the new technology. You can do sonmuch more with a new machine. Unless you only want to straight stitch. Then pick an old singer treadle & all you’ve gotta worry about is rust & the ancient leather belt drying out
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Old 08-26-2019, 06:09 AM
  #24  
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Please forgive any formating or spelling errors I am writing this on my phone. I found this old post while reminiscing about working as a viking dealer repair tech and wanted to add my two cents. I worked for a dealer that owned two stores during the transition from Viking Sweden to SVP. I saw the introduction of the SE, Diamond, and Ruby. (among mid level and entry level machines) I was Viking certified to repair those models and their TOL sergers. The Ruby was the first high end made in China. In fact the very first batch of Rubies was built on Sweden. Although there was probably less than a hundred swedish built Rubies. The swedish Rubies had some serious quality control problems and we always felt it was because the swedish factory workers had heard rumors they'd be out of a job soon and were 'short timing' it. The first Rubies out of China weren't built any better. As well as quality problems I would say half were missing at least one foot or more. We had dozens of sewers coming in and complaining about missing accessories.
Viking lost a lot of dealers at the time. Not only because of quality issues but also because the new SVP CEO removed just about every dealer insentive. Dealers no longer got bulk discounts when purchasing larger quantities of machines (therefore couldn't pass on savings to their customers) They also removed a 50/50 split in advertising costs that had been around forever.
Brother and Bernina reps we're calling Viking dealers across the country convincing them to swap brands. They still offered those incentives. You may know some dealers that dropped the Viking line during this time (or relegated them to a back corner, and picked a different brand as the forefront)
SVP also didn't renew the contract with their serger manufacturer. The beloved 936 (built in China, but with great quality control) was gone. Replaced by the S25, a serger despised by dealers because of how horrible the manufacturing quality was. We assumed it was built in the same factory as the Singer sergers. SVP also started rebranding some of the entry level machines: the entry level embroidery machine was simply a Singer with a Viking logo. Obviously this further upset many Viking dealers who realized the damage being done to the brand.
At one point SVP moved some of the Sedish quality control team to China semi-permanatly to get the issues under control and quality did improve. Unfortunately it took over a year before the Viking factory in China got their act together.
To comment on some posts above: the SE had some huge problems with the tension and went through 3 or 4 part revisions before it was eliminated. If I remember right there was a grounding problem. The first SE tension assembly didn't ground the static build up anywhere. Who would have thought running lots of thread very quickly between two metal disks would cause static build up in electronic equipment. The immediate fix from viking was for techs to solder a peice of wire to the frame and tension assembly.
Not sure if this'll be seen by anyone but if so, I hope I added something interesting.
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:48 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Faintly Artistic View Post
I bought a Daisy 325 in 1999, one of the last years it was built in Sweden. Last year had an issue and parts are no longer available, even though it is still under the 20 year warranty...I bought an even older Pfaff to replace it. The late 80's Pfaff is a much better machine, I just hope the computer board never goes out.
Faintly Artistic (cool moniker) I am so glad someone finally mentioned a Daisy. It seemed like on one else had one. We bought it shortly after returning from overseas in 1998. I also have a Sapphire 960q and am hoping we can keep her going as well. Each time I would take the Dais in for servicing the tech would say "don't ever get rid of this one, she's a workhorse"
So if I understand it, Pfaff and Viking are all under the same company?
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Old 08-26-2019, 07:52 AM
  #26  
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Always good to have an 'inside' view. Thanks for sharing. What about current models? Is it time to switch to another brand?
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Old 08-26-2019, 08:24 AM
  #27  
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it does not matter what kind of machine you have if they are older it will be harder to get parts
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:01 PM
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I would like to do a general overview comment before I comment on each reply below individually. I am now in the market for Electronic devices to replace an ailing Chromebook soon and to buy my first Computerize Electronic sewing machine. I have chosen both devices to be bought on one simple basis-the 1 Decade rule of thumb. If my device of choice lasts at least one decade without servicing from the "professionals," I feel I have gotten my money's worth and move on from the older "junk" devices.

Disposable is the name of the game. I still believe in quality and as much as quality control as I can find out there. Especially for sewing machines. I favor mechanical ones over the computerized ones because I keep them up and service them myself. I don't name them or have a "relationship" with them. When the decade of ownership is almost up, I buy a new model and keep the old ones until they give out. It has worked well for me.

Originally Posted by lorimax5859 View Post
This is not a rumor. My Viking SE needed a sensor replaced about 7 yrs ago and had it repaired with no problems. Last month it needed another sensor but dealer told me might as well "junk it" that sensors for Viking unavailable and if they were able to find one it would cost more than the machine was worth. Junked it for parts. So sad.
See what I mean?

Originally Posted by carolynjo View Post
I can relate to your comment, not only to sewing machines, but to all machines these days. My washer died last week and a "repairman" came out to check on it. I should have spared myself $100.00 and gotten a new washer. (it is being delivered today.) I have decided that, once something "goes", one should just junk it and try to find a comparable replacement. I am hanging on to my 1958 Singer 401A as it still sews like a dream. I also own a featherweight.
The only thing worth fixing professionally are houses.

Originally Posted by SewingSew View Post
It seems to me that there used to be a lot more pride in craftsmanship and quality. These days, most things seem to be designed to be disposable. And you know that businessmen are laughing all the way to the bank, because they're counting on your repeat business. God help our children because one day the world will be one huge landfill.
Our children don't have to wait. Landfills are everywhere.

Originally Posted by newbee3 View Post
it does not matter what kind of machine you have if they are older it will be harder to get parts
How true. Although I noticed that cleaning and some adjustments are the things needed with my sewing machines over the years, not so much parts.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:50 PM
  #29  
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Tothill, our "newest" vehicle is a 2002 Yukon, with over 325,000 miles on it, still runs good. My "newest" and only computerized machine is at least 10 years old, with no problems whatsoever, but I have it serviced yearly.
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Old 08-28-2019, 09:25 AM
  #30  
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Why do old(er) established brands (incuding Microsoft, Bernina, and Viking) release products that they know have serious issues?

Especially when they have "good/reliable/trusted" products available?

I would think that the damage done would cost the companies a lot more than any "profits" the company made from selling "poor quality" products.
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