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Thread: NO sash Quilt As You Go

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by oh munner View Post
    Wow.... a bit snippy aren't we?
    The response to the snippy, "Yep _ I stopped reading after a few lines, so I have no idea what you were talking about. Pictures always help!" is snippy? Or the the original snippy is snippy? The first was rude, unwelcoming, and totally unnecessary. The response snippy could have been left unsaid.

  2. #27
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    FYI. That's par for the course on this board. I just ignore that kind of stuff. You were helpful and I've never seen this method, and apparently a few others have not either. So thanks for sharing-most people here are pleasant and helpful/grateful.

    eta: I lie-I don't always ignore it. Sometimes I get into a war of words and usually wish I'd just ignored it but I have a big mouth and can't always do it. At any rate, don't let it turn you off this board.

  3. #28
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    I don't understand :-(

    I get how it works on the front, but am deep in the dark on how the back can come out right.
    Anyone work their way out of the same confusion and willing to share?
    Fortune favours the prepared mind
    "Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." Albert Einstein

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale View Post
    FYI. That's par for the course on this board. I just ignore that kind of stuff. You were helpful and I've never seen this method, and apparently a few others have not either. So thanks for sharing-most people here are pleasant and helpful/grateful.

    eta: I lie-I don't always ignore it. Sometimes I get into a war of words and usually wish I'd just ignored it but I have a big mouth and can't always do it. At any rate, don't let it turn you off this board.
    Hoosier here; North Central. Hi, Neighbor!

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by noveltyjunkie View Post
    I don't understand :-(

    I get how it works on the front, but am deep in the dark on how the back can come out right.
    Anyone work their way out of the same confusion and willing to share?
    The back is not all one piece/sheet. It is strips of fabric that is cut the same size and shape as the rows. You will have rows on the back side as well, which is why the demo here: http://www.candiedfabrics.com/2013/0...ing-as-you-go/ was able to create a completely reversible quilt; instead of backing she used another quilt top. She does not show the piecing example the first time she attaches a row but if you scroll down there is a pic of it when she attaches the third row, I think.

  6. #31
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    I'm just a bit north of Logansport.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by gale View Post
    I'm just a bit north of Logansport.
    About a little over an hour away; north of Warsaw. Man, what a small world. I checked your blogs; we also home educate. Like I said, small world. (Your zebra gifts are great!)

    I mostly quilt selvage quilts but since all good things come to an end including the boxes of selvages I was gifted I have started trying to see if I could get another passion going in quilting, which looks like will be my version of paper-piecing or piece-by-number. I am on the hunt for a good, fun owl pattern. Nice to meet you!

  8. #33
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Thank you. I think I see what she means now. It's not what we normally think of a QAYG but it is a way to build on the right of your work as you go. In your original post I thought you were describing something where you quilt front back and batting together first, but I guess that was just for the first strip.

    One more question- why not make your first strip twice as wide- you could do the right half and then flip it. Still keeps your work off to the left but saves you one join in your batting?

    Quote Originally Posted by yobrosew View Post
    The back is not all one piece/sheet. It is strips of fabric that is cut the same size and shape as the rows. You will have rows on the back side as well, which is why the demo here: http://www.candiedfabrics.com/2013/0...ing-as-you-go/ was able to create a completely reversible quilt; instead of backing she used another quilt top. She does not show the piecing example the first time she attaches a row but if you scroll down there is a pic of it when she attaches the third row, I think.
    Fortune favours the prepared mind
    "Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." Albert Einstein

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by noveltyjunkie View Post
    Thank you. I think I see what she means now. It's not what we normally think of a QAYG but it is a way to build on the right of your work as you go. In your original post I thought you were describing something where you quilt front back and batting together first, but I guess that was just for the first strip.

    One more question- why not make your first strip twice as wide- you could do the right half and then flip it. Still keeps your work off to the left but saves you one join in your batting?
    I did mention in the original post the quilt front block sewn directly to the batting. In this block I used the batting as foundation and then trimmed a 1/4 seam allowance. I would attach a bunch of this side-to-side for a row. No need to put batting between top and bottom now. This way if my blocks are not too big and/or I use flannel back I can skip the machine quilting altogether. Or I may just run a three lines about 1/2' apart down the middle of the row for machine quilting. I am not real familiar with uploading photos so may have to magnify to see.
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  10. #35
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Thank you. Sounds like you have found a technique that works well for you. We all conceptualise differently I think. Vive la difference!
    Fortune favours the prepared mind
    "Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." Albert Einstein

  11. #36
    Senior Member giquilt's Avatar
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    After I watched the video from the website posted, your written instructions made sense. I have two quilts that I have made blocks for that are good candidates for this method.

  12. #37
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    Would love to see some pictures.
    SHIRLEY

  13. #38
    Super Member sunrise450's Avatar
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    Thank you for your instructions. It makes perfect sense to me. Now I am anxious to give it a try.
    Good Better Best, never let it rest till the good is better and the better best

  14. #39
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    Thank you so much for this information and the resulting website to watch. I am also a dressmaker/curtain/whatever sew person who started quilting 8 years ago. I have read numerous books about QAYG and have knew instinctively that there is a simpler way to do this. Thank you.

  15. #40
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    UPDATE No pictures. However I have found quilting each square to batting (or flannel which is my choice for the 'innards') followed by sewing these into rows and then doing this approach without the backing of rows being quilted is great! The warmth factor is increased as there are no quilt stitching holes on backside and has a baffled effect similar to a down comforter. Works ideally with squares 8" or less but even the 10" squares work well, especially if the backing is flannel (one I did was paper pieced onto muslin and then flannel for backing). Anyways, this way is so easy-peasy because it is east to machine quilt each block individually and no quilting with a big heavy quilt!

  16. #41
    Senior Member cherylmae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yobrosew View Post
    Well, thankfully I found someone who does it this way AND demonstrates it. When she attaches the second row she is not specific but covers it in detail when attaching the third so be sure to read all the way through. http://www.candiedfabrics.com/2013/0...ing-as-you-go/
    I love this tutorial. I promised a king quilt to neighbor and now I know how I will quilt it. Bless you!

  17. #42
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Since I am a visual learner, this doesn't help me much. However, it is fairly easy to understand. Thanks to the ones who added the visual part of the tutorial!! I'm learning something new every day!!
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  18. #43
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    For a King sized quilt, I wonder if you could use this method to make two or three sections, then join them with another method. My problem with quilting large quilts on my sewing machine is moving the bulk of the quilt around without experiencing pain. Even though this method keeps the previously quilted portions to the left, by the final rows, you're still dealing with the weight of the quilt on the left side.
    Elizabeth

  19. #44
    Super Member juneayerza's Avatar
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    Thank you yobrosew for introducing this topic. I watched to video and read your tute and I'm ready to give it a try.
    June

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by elizajo View Post
    For a King sized quilt, I wonder if you could use this method to make two or three sections, then join them with another method. My problem with quilting large quilts on my sewing machine is moving the bulk of the quilt around without experiencing pain. Even though this method keeps the previously quilted portions to the left, by the final rows, you're still dealing with the weight of the quilt on the left side.
    This is a good question. I have quilted each block individually to the batting only, then sewed into rows, then did this method, leaving the backside without quilting. This meant only sewing the straight seam to add each new column. I only use a 3/4 sewing machine and it was a challenge, weight-wise, towards the ends. Thinking on your question has me playing with another idea I am going to try to experiement with. First I would get my rows sewn and then figure a way to crochet with fabric strips the rows together. I really like quilting each block separately to the batting only (or paper piecing to batting) as I do not need to use a quilting foot/walking foot of any kind with my little machine.

    Back to the crocheting the rows together; not sure yet HOW I am going to do this but it is playing around in my head! One thing is I would try do this qayg method with the blocks to make up the rows, instead of the row-to-row; block-to-block instead. Then I would have to connect the finished rows. Maybe I will start a post with the process of my search and experimentation?>?>?

  21. #46
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    More thinking on alternative ways to connect rows.....could complete rows, connecting blocks sew-flip, and then connect rows with big buttons and buttonholes? Say on an 8" block have two buttons, sewn on by machine, on right side of block and hole on left side. Naturally, this would work better with a scrappy of framed blocks so not to interfere with design. . . just trying to think outside the block, so to speak!

  22. #47
    Junior Member CurliQ's Avatar
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    I'm with you ladies. I love this idea and now I'm trying to figure out how to do complete sections and then join them. I have lots of ideas spinning around. Time for some tests.
    ~Sharon

  23. #48
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    After reading about other QAYG methods, I think you could use one of them for the final join of two quilted halves. Machine stitch the top pieced layers right sides together, but leave the backing folded back out of the way. Trim and whipstitch the batting together, then slip stitch the backing by hand.
    Elizabeth

  24. #49
    Super Member sewbeadit's Avatar
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    I went to this video, thank you yobrosew and it made it so clear now I understand the directions, thanks so much! Very interesting I will try it.
    Sewbeadit
    W. Washington

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