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Rhonda's Easy Way to Piece HST Quilt Blocks and others

Rhonda's Easy Way to Piece HST Quilt Blocks and others

Old 05-21-2010, 07:26 PM
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Are the outside edges of the HST on the bias or on the straight of grain?

From the pictures, it looks like the outside edges are bias?
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by bearisgray
Are the outside edges of the HST on the bias or on the straight of grain?

From the pictures, it looks like the outside edges are bias?
I don't pay any attention to bias so I don't know. But since my stuff is so small it isn't an issue. It might be for the larger blocks. I don't really even know how to tell the grain. So I guess I would have to say you will need to experiment and see if it matters or not. Sorry that is the best I can do!!
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Old 05-22-2010, 03:19 AM
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The grain is the way the threads in the fabric goes.

The threads that go across the fabric from selvage to selvage are called the crosswise grain - usually has more stretch than the lengthwise grain.

The threads that are parallel to the selvage are called the lengthwise grain. Usually has the least amount of stretch.

If one goes diagonally, then the grain is on the bias. Usually there is the most stretch when fabric is cut at a 45 degree angle.

This has a fairly clear explanation with illustrations.
http://sewing.about.com/od/beginner1/p/fabricgrain.htm
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Old 05-22-2010, 10:40 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by bearisgray
Are the outside edges of the HST on the bias or on the straight of grain?

From the pictures, it looks like the outside edges are bias?
I had another lady question the bias. Here is what I answered her with.

This is her question:
Am I missing something ?? If you cut the original half-square triangle unit out of the strip---don't you then have all of
the sides of the square on the bias ? Awfully hard to sew
accurately to anything else, especially for beginners because they stretch/ what you have after further cutting & sewing is an hourglass, not a four-patch. four-patch is 4 squares of different colors or pairs of colors.[/quote]

My answer:
I cut and sewed a 4" HST. I sewed another piece to one side as if you were sewing blocks together. Yes the sides are on the bias. I sewed two differant ways. Two differant blocks. With the seam following the straight grain and another with the seam following the bias.They came out the same.

When you piece two blocks together I pin in the center and then match the ends on each side. If you don't pull on the side of the HST you shouldn't have any trouble getting them to line up without stretching. I had no problem.

If you are getting an hour glass then I suggest you may need to look at your seams and tighten them where they need it. I do get blocks that are off kilter when sewn together but it doesn't have anything to do with grain but with getting a good seam.

I have done a tutorial for fixing problems when doing HSTs

This might help if your 4 patch is not coming out right.

http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-23252-1.htm

There is no reason in my opinion that a beginner can't do this.
HSTs are a first step to learning to do more involved quilt blocks.
If you are doing small stuff don't worry about bias. But if you are doing larger HSTs then just pay attention to anchor the center and the corners. When you have a couple of blocks that one is just a tad wider than the other you can gently work the fabric in so the two fit together without any tucks. If you pin in the center and pin or I prefer to tack( it has less room to move) then if you have a large block or row of blocks then pin from the center out part way and from the outside in to meet in the middle between the center of the block and the corner of the block. This is a valuable thing to learn and any beginner can learn it. Once you can do this the bias is not a problem.
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Old 08-17-2010, 11:39 AM
  #45  
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Well done! I like this tutorial. Thank you for sharing your expertise with all of us.
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Old 08-17-2010, 01:51 PM
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Nice tutorial.

I like the way you did the overview - took it down - and then built it back up.

You made a complicated looking block look very do-able.

:thumbup: :thumbup:
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Old 08-17-2010, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by bearisgray
Nice tutorial.

I like the way you did the overview - took it down - and then built it back up.

You made a complicated looking block look very do-able.

:thumbup: :thumbup:
Thanks Sharon I think they are easy to do. I appreciate your comments!!
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Old 08-18-2010, 10:39 AM
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Rhonda - I too appreciate when you illustrate it. I saw a great quilt pattern in a magazine-type catalog. So I just divided it into "blocks", then figured out how each block was turned to make the design. It's not an exact copy, but now I can make this pattern because you have simplified breaking a pattern down into parts and pieces.
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Old 08-18-2010, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by SaraSewing
Rhonda - I too appreciate when you illustrate it. I saw a great quilt pattern in a magazine-type catalog. So I just divided it into "blocks", then figured out how each block was turned to make the design. It's not an exact copy, but now I can make this pattern because you have simplified breaking a pattern down into parts and pieces.
Way to go!! That is exactly what I have been trying to get across to people. If you can "see" the "Blocks" you can take the design apart on any quilt block and then make the sections easy to make.

I so appreciate hearing this Sara!! :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Old 08-18-2010, 04:58 PM
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Another keeper!
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