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1912 Singer Red Eye - broken thread guide

1912 Singer Red Eye - broken thread guide

Old 08-23-2019, 11:47 PM
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Default 1912 Singer Red Eye - broken thread guide

I recently acquired a battered 1912 Singer Red Eye that I've painstakingly gone through, only to realize that the upper arm thread guide, the wire hook near the thread take-up lever, had been snapped off. There is only the tiniest bit protruding (which was why I didn't notice it in the first place), not really enough to grab onto. I can get a replacement guide, but how do I get what's left of the old one out? I can't find where anyone has addressed this particular calamity. Any suggestions? Surely it can't mean the end of Lavinia...can it?
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Old 08-24-2019, 05:24 AM
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that is a beautiful machine, just bumping your note, we have some real experts here. Welcome!
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Old 09-01-2019, 07:07 PM
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I'm not really much help, as I have never had to replace that piece. I think it is press fit in and probably Singer had special tools to put them in. It is a fairly fine wire. I've heard of other type of press fit SM pieces being replaced, but most are larger. I think one would need to be very careful to not make the hole any larger or breaking the SM head. I have been trying to think of where I saw someone who had used some sort of screw type clamp with nuts on the back side and some sort of screw or nail to slowly press the piece out -- being careful not to use something too large to press it out.

I'm thinking something similar to a cherry pitter or a a syringe where there would be support on the back side while pressing the front.

I don't know if an OSMG would have a tool to replace it or not.

Good luck.

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Old 09-02-2019, 02:03 AM
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Old 09-02-2019, 07:08 AM
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Still creeping toward a possible solution. Tapping with a hardened punch did nothing but smoosh it down from jagged to smooth. The suggestion from a sewing machine restorer is to use a drill press to either drill out the broken guide or make a new hole just a little above it. This involves getting a heavy drill press buried in the garage onto a stand I don't currently have, cleaning, oiling, learning. A machinist, I am not -- but I'm willing to try, fully cognizant of the fact that I could ruin her. It's not a beauty contest, believe me; this machine was dug out of a garden, completely frozen and with a plant growing out of the missing faceplate. Initially she was only supposed to be a practice/learning machine, but you know how you get attached and emotionally involved...
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:05 AM
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I just looked at one of my 66s. You can access the thread guide from the faceplate. With the faceplate removed, you can see the other end of the thread guide. So, it is indeed just a force fit.

Just throwing out a bunch of ideas...
Can you secure the machine and make a dimple in the broken thread guide piece that if left? Then use a Dremel to drill it out? Protect the head. If you think you can, instead of drilling, try to tap it out. Suggest you keep the head on its back, so if the piece does come out, it is not lost and end up inside the head!

There does not seem to be enough of the thread guide on the inside to make an effort to remove it from that side. A long shot!!! But, if you protect the head and place a flat object on the inside ON the thread guide, and on the outside near, but not on the thread guide, you may be able to use a pliers without teeth to push it from the inside out.

Is there any way you can get a flat piece of metal on the inside, that covers the thread guide, and get a small clamp on each side of the plate , and tighten each one equally until the thread guide moves out the front enough to grab ahold of it? ( make sure you protect outside of the head hear also.

I honestly don't know which is the best way.
I realize I threw a lot out to you. Some may not be feasible. You will need to determine which way to go.
Any thoughts to help guys?
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:57 AM
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Yes, I have accessed it from behind with a hardened punch after removing the presser and needle bars, both from the access hole on the back side and from the side -- neither could get me straight on, so both at slight angles. It didn't budge. That's when I tried it from the front, and it only smooshed it flat. At no point was there enough to grab from either end. Hadn't considered a dremel -- enough power? -- but I am considering a power drill rather than the drill press.

I'm trying to visualize the clamp idea...food for thought! I'm in no hurry, want to take my best shot.

Thanks!
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Old 09-03-2019, 06:49 PM
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If using a dremel, i would definitely use an electric, not battery operated. Much more power. There is a drill press attachment for a dremel . I have it and it works for all applications i have needed it for, to date. I am not sure a power drill can take a small enough bit, but maybe there is a small enough chuck, i am no familiar with. Let us know how things go. Regards,
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Old 09-04-2019, 03:39 PM
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There are also flex cables and chucks for Dremels so you can get into tight places.
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Old 09-04-2019, 03:48 PM
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Oooh, flex cables for Dremels, I had no idea... I'm thinking the Dremel is sounding better and better.
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