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  • Biggest harp for treadle machine?

  • Biggest harp for treadle machine?

    Old 06-19-2015, 06:00 AM
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    Default Biggest harp for treadle machine?

    Think it is called the harp -- the area under the arm??? Largest height? Largest width? Anyone ever make a list? Thanks.
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    Old 06-19-2015, 06:09 AM
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    I don't think you will find the harp size in older DSM that you find in the modern ones. My opinion is that quilters in those day pieced by machine but they quilted their quilts in quilting groups.
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    Old 06-19-2015, 07:34 AM
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    There were many older machines with large harps. The height and width of the harp space is part of the database I am compiling. when finished we can run a report/chart. Here are just a couple in my collection..

    1872 - Howe C (Long Arm)
    1876 - White VS1
    1880 - Wheeler Wilson #10 (IMO - The best for quilting, High/Low speed, huge harp, smooth as glass, tremendous punching power)
    1885 - Singer VS2 ( IMO the second best on this list)
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    Old 06-19-2015, 09:04 AM
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    Originally Posted by ManiacQuilter2
    I don't think you will find the harp size in older DSM that you find in the modern ones. My opinion is that quilters in those day pieced by machine but they quilted their quilts in quilting groups.
    I've always felt that the harp is shrinking as you go from vintage to modern day machines. I think it is on Sewclassic where coke cans are stacked in the harp to compare. While living in Wenatchee, a friend who could afford any machine she wanted, went to a sewing machine shop and said she wanted a machine she could quilt her tops on. She did not want a long arm, already had other machines with all the bells and whistles, just the best and most reliable domestic machine for quilting. She came home with a fully serviced electric Singer 15-91 with accessories.

    You did say Treadle. Take a look at the sticky titled "Quilts made using Vintage Machines". They love to tell you about their treadle machines and show the beautiful work turned out.

    Last edited by elnan; 06-19-2015 at 09:10 AM. Reason: add more
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    Old 06-19-2015, 10:55 AM
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    Originally Posted by elnan
    I've always felt that the harp is shrinking as you go from vintage to modern day machines. I think it is on Sewclassic where coke cans are stacked in the harp to compare. While living in Wenatchee, a friend who could afford any machine she wanted, went to a sewing machine shop and said she wanted a machine she could quilt her tops on. She did not want a long arm, already had other machines with all the bells and whistles, just the best and most reliable domestic machine for quilting. She came home with a fully serviced electric Singer 15-91 with accessories.

    You did say Treadle. Take a look at the sticky titled "Quilts made using Vintage Machines". They love to tell you about their treadle machines and show the beautiful work turned out.
    I guess since most vintage electrics can be made into a treadle......I am limiting the question with "treadle", huh? What got me thinking is I was looking across the room at my vintage Elna that is known for its quilting and also at my White Rotary (treadle but White made for years also as electric) and noticed how small the Elna opening is compared to White Rotary. That led me to wonder what the biggest of the oldies was.
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    Old 06-19-2015, 11:59 AM
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    Here is the W&W #10 with a typical New Home next to it.
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]522828[/ATTACH]
    Attached Thumbnails 2013-06-18-20.44.20.jpg  
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    Old 06-19-2015, 12:30 PM
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    Pretty much all older treadles have a good harp size. Maybe it is not wide but there is a lot of height. I am only familiar with singers and I think the Singer 201 might have a slightly wider harp.
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    Old 06-19-2015, 01:31 PM
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    Originally Posted by SteveH
    Here is the W&W #10 with a typical New Home next to it.
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]522828[/ATTACH]
    Gorgeous machine! Thanks for the eye-candy.

    Cobbler's machines oftain where used with a removable bed, much like the ones used with modern day free-arm machines, so they could do other kinds of work that need a flat bed. Some of those machines have astonishingly long harps.
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    Old 06-19-2015, 01:52 PM
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    From what I've seen unless you're buying a modern machine designed especially for quilting most modern domestic machines will have a smaller harp than an older straight stitch domestic machine. It's a combination of changes in style and the fact that zigzag machines have a lot more going on in the upper arm than straight stitch machines.
    Rodney
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    Old 06-19-2015, 01:57 PM
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    I think on more common machines the Singer 66 has more area under the harp than a Singer 15. Old White rotaries may be even larger and Singer 27s have a good sized harp.
    Rodney
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