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Thread: Binding Foot for thick layers?

  1. #1
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    Binding Foot for thick layers?

    Hi again everyone! First, thanks so much for all the help with my Singer 301 which I received with a broken part. She's now set up in her cabinet and running beautifully!

    I'm now playing gleefully with the attachments (she came with two boxes of them - part of why I bid on this particular machine).

    I quilt, but also make musical instrument accessories to sell. The most dreaded part of any instrument case is attaching the bias binding to the internal seams at the very end. It's a NIGHTMARE! I've tried doing it the 2-step way and the 1-step. Luckily, it's a bit forgiving because once the case (which is semi-rigid) is flipped right-side out again, these seams are a bit recessed and hidden (what with all that stabilized fabric, foam, etc... in the gusset and main panels). But, I'm a perfectionist so I'd like to get it perfect!

    My question is about the vintage bias binding foot that came with my machine (and was standard for all of these machines, I believe). I haven't been able to figure out a way to use it for my purposes yet as the layers that I have to fold the binding tape around are VERY thick. The two main layers of fabric (the main panel and the gusset) are stabilized with the absolute heaviest craft stabilizer/interfacing so that it's cardboard-thick. The lining is Kona cotton interfaced with light fusible, so not too thick, but still - two layers of that.

    Is there some kind of trick, by chance, to get these through the binder so that I can use that attachment? Or, if not, any ideas on another attachment (such as a hemmer- I have 10 of them!) that might work in a pinch? Obviously another foot wouldn't feed the bias tape through, but anything that could just help to hold everything flush to the right would be fantastic! My biggest issue is with the slippery tape sliding off and, before I know it, I end up sewing the bias binding tape to itself - no raw seams in the middle - and have to rip it out. So frustrating but so common because of the many curves in these cases (especially the ukulele cases - so small and curvy!).

    Any tips at all (not just related to the vintage attachments) would be much appreciated!

  2. #2
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    I bought this for my vintage Bernina:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/JAPAN-SUISEI...item5af2bbd732
    As long as there is two hole right to the needle, it will fit.
    It`s not cheap, but it`s very high quality and well made: you can keep it attached and move it away when you don't need it. I have attached "utility" quilt binding with it, biais tape on garnement, etc. Love, love this tool.
    I have tried the "binding foot" that was coming with my Bernina 730; I was curious to see if it would work. Nope. Wasn't able to do anything with it :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by profannie View Post
    I bought this for my vintage Bernina:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/JAPAN-SUISEI...item5af2bbd732
    Thanks so much! I had actually heard rumors of a Bernina 'Industrial' bias binding attachment but couldn't find it - I bet you this is it! :-) I'll have to do a bit of research and see if they make it in a slant shank or if I can get some sort of adapter to use it with my slant shank machine! And as for its not being cheap...the number of hours it will save me in this final step of constructing my cases will pay for it after just one case! I spend so much TIME on this step!

    Thank you!!! :-)

  4. #4
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBaila View Post
    Any tips at all (not just related to the vintage attachments) would be much appreciated!
    Here is another attachment. I have a similar one made in China. It works. This one looks like it would work better.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/24mm-BIAS-BI...item27c2934088
    Ron in NW MO

  5. #5
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    I did the same research and yes, it's the one. As you can see from the picture, there is two screws on the left that allow the adjustment of how near of the needle you want the binding tool to arrive. It should be ok for a slant shank. But you could ask the seller directly (bought several notions from him, he is nice).
    For me also it was so worth it... I hated to put binding so much that I was always looking for another way to finish many project. Now, I'm putting binding everywhere :-)

  6. #6
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    Like profannie says, this attachment attaches to the BED of the machine, not the foot. So you have to make sure you have screw holes in your bed (like where the seam guide would attach.)

    My husband has been learning how to sew, and making gun and accessory cases - and he is also dealing with putting binding on layers and curves. This might be something that would be a good tool for him too.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vridar View Post
    Here is another attachment. I have a similar one made in China. It works. This one looks like it would work better.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/24mm-BIAS-BI...item27c2934088
    Here is my attachment on my Reliable, but, it is adjustable for most machines.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Ron in NW MO

  8. #8
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Ron,

    Could you post a picture showing the binding being installed?

    Joe

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    Ron's attachement is cheaper but seems to work the same way; the main difference is mine have an articulated "arm" that allow to put the binding tool away if you want to sew. It`s convenient if you are doing several sewing tasks with the same sewing machine and don't want to screw/unscrew it each time. I must admit I'm very lazy ;-)
    The result if very nice; waaaay better of what I can achieve when I'm trying to bind the old fashion way.

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    You folks are great!

    Thanks everyone- so much! And now I see what you mean about the attachment going on the bed of the machine- that's great (particularly since I see that I do indeed have those two screw holes!).

    So, no worries about slant shank, low shank, high shank, etc...

    Can't wait to try one of these! And Macybaby- I'm sure your husband is suffering as much as me in that case! It's a bear to get the binding on there, especially where the layers get even thicker (where straps are attached or the zipper from pockets, etc...). My 301 really powers through the layers though so now it's more an issue of maneuvering and keeping everything in position since pins are impossible right where they would be most useful!

    Quote Originally Posted by Macybaby View Post
    Like profannie says, this attachment attaches to the BED of the machine, not the foot. So you have to make sure you have screw holes in your bed (like where the seam guide would attach.)

    My husband has been learning how to sew, and making gun and accessory cases - and he is also dealing with putting binding on layers and curves. This might be something that would be a good tool for him too.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Ron,

    Could you post a picture showing the binding being installed?

    Joe
    Joe, 1st photo is a setup of 1 inch binding on a scrap of lawn chair sling material. The second is a photo of the stitch. Notice I started the stitching with the needle centered. Then switched to needle left making a better balance of margins. If I was seriously setting it up, I'd probably adjust the attachment to use needle center stitching. This was a quick setup for demonstration. If I was joining materials the lower material would be entering stitch area from below the attachment's plate.
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    Last edited by Vridar; 09-18-2013 at 12:40 PM. Reason: Better explanation.
    Ron in NW MO

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    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Ron,

    Thanks, those pics say a lot. How thick can you go with the material that you bind. I'm thinking of quilts.

    Joe

  13. #13
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Ron,

    Thanks, those pics say a lot. How thick can you go with the material that you bind. I'm thinking of quilts.

    Joe
    The metal is maliable so I assume one can open the throat of the attachment and feed as much material as the SM can handle.
    Ron in NW MO

  14. #14
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by profannie View Post
    Ron's attachement is cheaper but seems to work the same way; the main difference is mine have an articulated "arm" that allow to put the binding tool away if you want to sew. It`s convenient if you are doing several sewing tasks with the same sewing machine and don't want to screw/unscrew it each time. I must admit I'm very lazy ;-)
    The result if very nice; waaaay better of what I can achieve when I'm trying to bind the old fashion way.
    Yes, Sailrite.com has the swinging arm type to fit my machine. It would be a must if one was using the attachment a lot. Mine is time consuming and a little frustrating to get set. Consequently, it doesn't get used much. It's easier to eye ball no more binding than I do.
    Ron in NW MO

  15. #15
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Or .......... If one has multiple machines one could set one up with the binder and leave it. I think that's what I'd do.

    Ron, is your machine a ZZ or SS? And is that a walking foot I see?

    Joe

  16. #16
    Senior Member Vridar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Or .......... If one has multiple machines one could set one up with the binder and leave it. I think that's what I'd do.

    Ron, is your machine a ZZ or SS? And is that a walking foot I see?

    Joe
    Joe, it's a ZZ, but if I had it to do over, I'd get the SS. However, it was my entry into the world of sewing. If I knew what I know now, I'd have bought a 403 or 15. They will do everything I need. I do some contract marina sewing with the Reliable which can be done with a Vtg Singer. But, it's more impressive to show up with a heavy monster that probably doesn't do as fine a job as a 201. Can one imagine the chuckles I'd get showing up at the marina with a 75-80 year old machine?

    It is a walking foot. So, I can do special jobs such as multi-layered webbing sewing.
    Last edited by Vridar; 09-18-2013 at 04:16 PM.
    Ron in NW MO

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    Thank you again everyone!

    I ended up ordering the Sailrite swing-away, 1" binding attachment. Definitely not the cheapest, but with the time and effort it will save me (not to mention what I hope will be a superior result!), it will be well worth it! I can't tell you how many hours I've spent and how many tears I've shed in abject frustration in trying to bind the inner seams of these instrument cases! (Though I do still expect to have a bit of trouble with the concave curves...)

    Since I have to do these on every single thing I sell, I decided to go with the swing-away version for just $10 more than the stationary one.

    Fingers crossed!!! And Macy- I'll let you know how this works for the cardboard-thick layers of a 3-dimensional case if you'd like! Maybe we can help save your husband some time and suffering!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBaila View Post
    Thank you again everyone!

    I ended up ordering the Sailrite swing-away, 1" binding attachment. Definitely not the cheapest, but with the time and effort it will save me (not to mention what I hope will be a superior result!), it will be well worth it! I can't tell you how many hours I've spent and how many tears I've shed in abject frustration in trying to bind the inner seams of these instrument cases! (Though I do still expect to have a bit of trouble with the concave curves...)

    Since I have to do these on every single thing I sell, I decided to go with the swing-away version for just $10 more than the stationary one.

    Fingers crossed!!! And Macy- I'll let you know how this works for the cardboard-thick layers of a 3-dimensional case if you'd like! Maybe we can help save your husband some time and suffering!
    Of course there is a learning curve. I struggled with mine yesterday, because I was binding a cotton/minky blanket for my son. After an hour of ripping, I suddlendly remember that minky is always the responsable for anything going wrong; I turned the blanket and sewed with the minky up side. Bingo. So anything slippery should go up! It don't really matter because the binding make a perfect nice stitch on each side.

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    I'm waiting until my husband is home this weekend to look over them and decide what to get. I'm looking at a set for the Bernina - I expect they will fit any machine, but if not, Dh's Bernina can always be used for all binding.

  21. #21
    Super Member deplaylady's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for all the info!

  22. #22
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Bringing this thread back up to ask another question. Checked Sailrite and really can't afford their prices. Still don't have PayPal so eBay is out.

    So the question is; Is there any other on-line stores besides eBay where one can buy these binders?
    If so please share the links as my google-fu is exhausted.

    Thanks
    Joe

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