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  • Does anyone know this model number

    Old 12-01-2016, 03:25 PM
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    Default Does anyone know this model number

    I bought this several months ago at an auction (the same auction I bought 5 touch and sews) and put it in my storeroom. I had forgotten what kind of machine it was. I thought it might be an elna, but it's obviously not. I don't know if it works or not. Any idea of what the model number might be?

    bkay
    Attached Thumbnails viking.jpg  

    Last edited by bkay; 12-01-2016 at 03:27 PM. Reason: forgot photos
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    Old 12-01-2016, 03:27 PM
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    Originally Posted by bkay
    I bought this several months ago at an auction (the same auction I bought 5 touch and sews) and put it in my storeroom. I had forgotten what kind of machine it was. I thought it might be an elna, but it's obviously not. I don't know if it works or not. Any idea of what the model number might be?

    bkay
    There is no picture in your thread. Perhaps you are editing your post as I type? Hope so!

    ok... there it is. I can't help with model number but I like it!

    Last edited by ibex94; 12-01-2016 at 03:31 PM.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 07:35 AM
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    It's a 6370 or thereabouts. I found it on Google images. It's bad to freeze up. It also has a camstack that is prone to cracking. I found a youtube video where the guy shows where to look for the cracked camstack and another piece that I don't remember right now.

    I'm beginning to think that I may have about 10 parts machines of assorted brands. I may have to learn about parting out sewing machines. Wonder if there is a youtube video on that?

    bkay
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    Old 12-02-2016, 07:48 AM
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    They usually have a Model No. on the front. Check down where it says Made in Sweden.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 08:02 AM
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    I had a 6430 for a while, almost identical to yours, maybe the same. It was a nice machine, I sold it to someone who at the time needed a sewing machine asap (I don't usually sell anything, just pass things on). I regretted it after but I'm happy with my Elna now. It came with several cam sets, (sort of individual cam assembeled into knob shaped units) and did all sorts of nice stretchy stitches. I don't think any of them were cracked, and the mashine had been used a lot. In nice condition, complete with case Husqvarnas easily goes for $100 here (as in sold the next day).

    If you take on 60s and 70 models you have to expect tending to a few plastic parts. By the 1950s most brands used a few plastic gears, by the 60s all metal machines are few and far between. These machines can be very nice and worth it, but only to someone who fix them up to use them. It's not easy to sell them on for much more than it took to fix them up.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 09:17 AM
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    Check antique Husqvarnas. I think they started in Sweden but I do know they own Viking now.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 09:23 AM
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    I think Husqvarna and Viking always were the same company, but they branded machines in sold in US Viking and Husqvarna for machines sold in Scandinavia (perhaps even Europe). I couldn't find any info on the details, but at some point they started to brand machines with both names. The last Swedish made Husqvarna was some times in the 1980s. I swear by the 19E, 21E and the flat bed version of them. They can need a bit of sorting out though. The older straight stitchers are nice too.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 12:57 PM
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    [ATTACH=CONFIG]563044[/ATTACH] This is what I have been sewing on since 1978. It is a Viking model 5560. It has one plastic part that I had to replace about 5 years ago but has been a workhorse for me. I had it upgraded to the cams at some point, that's why it has the aftermarket stitch panel attached to the front.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 01:00 PM
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    Originally Posted by Mickey2
    These machines can be very nice and worth it, but only to someone who fix them up to use them. It's not easy to sell them on for much more than it took to fix them up.
    The problem is that you can only use so many - and they do take up some room.

    I don't know enough about fixing them up to do it in a reasonable amount of time. Given I'm not 16 anymore, I don't want to spend my time repairing sewing machines. That does not sound like something pleasant to do. (I'd rather be quilting.) I like cleaning them up, oiling them and fiddling with them, but not much past that. When I bought these machines, I thought they were probably someone's collection. They weren't. They were in the storeroom for a sewing machine dealer, who apparently stopped paying the rent. The photos were a lot better than the reality, also. (Bidding on something without actually seeing it is not a good idea.) They were either returns, trade-ins or parts machines. Fortunately, I don't have enough invested that trashing them all would be a big deal. I just hate to totally waste them. Some of them are pretty neat machines. I just don't want to learn to repair them.
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    Old 12-02-2016, 01:47 PM
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    Originally Posted by bkay
    ...Given I'm not 16 anymore, I don't want to spend my time repairing sewing machines. That does not sound like something pleasant to do. (I'd rather be quilting.)...
    ...I just don't want to learn to repair them...
    Yeah, old age will do that for you (...sorry I just couldn't resist ).

    I have no plans to take classes to become a sewing repair guy either, but I take on machines and fix them up if I like them or find them interesting for some reason. I replace plastic gears, have new motor pulleys made, spend time tracking down timing belts. I take my time, it has taken anything from a couple of weeks to 18 months before I sorted out everything. I spent and hour here and and a couple of hours there, parts can take time to track down in some cases. When I find a machine worthy I don't give up easily :- )

    Last edited by Mickey2; 12-02-2016 at 01:50 PM.
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