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Hopefully bringing a Singer 401g back from a long sleep

Hopefully bringing a Singer 401g back from a long sleep

Old 09-13-2020, 04:13 AM
  #21  
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Wow! That's coming along nicely.
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Old 09-13-2020, 04:15 AM
  #22  
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Great job!, it looks perfect. The treadle irons looks like they are in very nice condition too.

The knob is notorious for needing exasperating repetitions of oiling, ...daily, for weeks on end in the worst of cases. You machine probably is probably on the easy side. It looks like it's in very nice condition, no excess oil or grime mess. There are tutorials for taking off the knob, as well as the cam stack, but unless there's rust or lots of dried up grease, regular oiling should do the job.

Best of luck
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Old 09-13-2020, 05:05 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by QuiltMom2 View Post
Wow! That's coming along nicely.
Thank you!

Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
Great job!, it looks perfect. The treadle irons looks like they are in very nice condition too.

The knob is notorious for needing exasperating repetitions of oiling, ...daily, for weeks on end in the worst of cases. You machine probably is probably on the easy side. It looks like it's in very nice condition, no excess oil or grime mess. There are tutorials for taking off the knob, as well as the cam stack, but unless there's rust or lots of dried up grease, regular oiling should do the job.

Best of luck
Thank you so much.

​​​​​​The treadle is in great shape just in need of a cleaning.
​​​​​
I've read here about that knob being difficult.
I'm trying to avoid removing it for now, but I'm seriously tempted to do it. Would make things definitely easier

Do you have any tips on how to remove old dissolved oil that's collecting on the bottom of the machine? I've been using paper towels to absorb it, but it's time consuming and I'm always afraid of the paper ripping and leaving some behind. Is it ok to flip the machine upside down? In order to drain it.
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Old 09-13-2020, 05:32 AM
  #24  
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Personally I have used paper towels, strips of old rags twisted around a wooden skewers. I have sometimes come across extra large cotton swabs, those are good. I tend to use heaps of cotton swabs on a machine. I guess you just have to get inventive. It is time consuming, I don't think there are any way about it. Having the machine on the side or up side down should not be a problem in my mind, it is harder to poke around in there though and be carefull not to damage knobs or hinges that can't take the weight of the machine. Compressed air? I know you often have to look far and wide to find a repair guy who does a thorough cleaning and service on these machines.

Last edited by Mickey2; 09-13-2020 at 05:34 AM.
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Old 09-13-2020, 06:35 AM
  #25  
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Look at that baby...it's beautiful!
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Old 09-13-2020, 08:47 AM
  #26  
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Get some 90% rubbing alcohol or kerosene to get those last bits. Soak up the excess with anything absorbent that suits you. What remains will evaporate. Don't get the alcohol on the red lever, as it will take off the paint.

Looks like a great machine in really nice shape. You are doing a great job.

bkay

edit: unscented lamp oil is just plain kerosene, available from Walmart

Last edited by bkay; 09-13-2020 at 08:48 AM. Reason: adding lamp oil
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Old 09-13-2020, 10:55 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by tropit View Post
Look at that baby...it's beautiful!
Isn't it? Time well spent bringing it back.
Tomorrow is back to cleaning and oiling and starting on the treadle.

Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
Personally I have used paper towels, strips of old rags twisted around a wooden skewers. I have sometimes come across extra large cotton swabs, those are good. I tend to use heaps of cotton swabs on a machine. I guess you just have to get inventive. It is time consuming, I don't think there are any way about it. Having the machine on the side or up side down should not be a problem in my mind.
(...)
Compressed air? I know you often have to look far and wide to find a repair guy who does a thorough cleaning and service on these machines.
Good call on the skeewers+rags, thank you. Those extra long cotton swabs would be sweet, but no such thing around here.
I've found myself wishing I had a compressor way to many times.


Originally Posted by bkay View Post
Get some 90% rubbing alcohol or kerosene to get those last bits.
Thank you! I was afraid of the rubbing alcohol and the paint on the dials good to know the only problem is the red lever.

I also would love the polish up the badges but I'm afraid steel wool might remove the markings on them. Do you have any experience with this?

​​​​​
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Old 09-13-2020, 02:40 PM
  #28  
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Never steel wool on anything, exception would be bare rusted metal. Chromed parts don't need it. You could try gentle polishing on the oval badge, I would not use anything more abrasive than liquid car polish, and test a tiny spot with cotton swab first. The whitish part is gritty, and lifts up grime. The numbers and decor on the stitch lenght lever back plate is usually delicate, I can't remember exactly how the paint is on the 401. I expect gold trims to be delciat, the beige paint is rather tough. If a badge is a bit dull, it might be wear, not grime, best leave it alone, just the gentlest of cleaning. Badges on some machines are soft metal and would scratch, the paint is often even softer, unlike the chromed parts.
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Old 09-13-2020, 03:27 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Jay401 View Post
Isn't it? Time well spent bringing it back.
Tomorrow is back to cleaning and oiling and starting on the treadle.



Good call on the skeewers+rags, thank you. Those extra long cotton swabs would be sweet, but no such thing around here.
I've found myself wishing I had a compressor way to many times.




Thank you! I was afraid of the rubbing alcohol and the paint on the dials good to know the only problem is the red lever.

I also would love the polish up the badges but I'm afraid steel wool might remove the markings on them. Do you have any experience with this?

​​​​​
I think I would try metal polish. I've used it extensively on sewing machines, but not on the badge. That would still be my first choice.

I have to admit that I am afraid of the auto polish, although everyone says to use it. I have a black 301 that needs that, but it's still sitting there.

bkay
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Old 09-14-2020, 01:48 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Mickey2 View Post
Never steel wool on anything, exception would be bare rusted metal. Chromed parts don't need it. You could try gentle polishing on the oval badge, I would not use anything more abrasive than liquid car polish, and test a tiny spot with cotton swab first.
[...]
Badges on some machines are soft metal and would scratch, the paint is often even softer, unlike the chromed parts.
Thank you. Liquid car polish worked. It didn't make brand new, but that's not what I wanted either. It's an old machine and despite the good condition you can tell it has a few years on it, badges being too shiny would look wrong. It cleaned them up and increased contrast which is what I wanted.

The badges on this machine appear to be brass that's etched and painted, the painting makes me weary of anything abrassive.

Originally Posted by bkay View Post
I think I would try metal polish. I've used it extensively on sewing machines, but not on the badge. That would still be my first choice.

I have to admit that I am afraid of the auto polish, although everyone says to use it. I have a black 301 that needs that, but it's still sitting there.

bkay
Metal polish should work well too.
I used liquid polishing on the whole machine without any problem or scratches, mine is a very delicate polish. I've use it on musical instruments without issues. So I felt more comfortable using it. However it's always a bit scary.
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