Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: I brought home one for repair

  1. #1
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975

    I brought home one for repair

    Someone finally talked me into it. I knew it would happen eventually. Other people have mentioned their machines in hopes I do repair and I have waived them off.

    I was checking out the yard sales yesterday and as usual asking about sewing machines just in case one was hidden from sight. The homeowner said yes! they had a machine but they were having troubles with it, and the conversation continued as I explained I take them working or not if the price is right. Somehow it moved to her wanting me to fix her machine. It felt awkward and I explained I am new to this hobby and generally don't do that but she said if I fix it she'll pay me and if I don't then keep it. Well, ok. When she found the box she'd put it into, I saw it was a Necchi. It had been so long since she had the problem she couldn't remember what it was.

    I got it home and found it missing the bobbin case, the hook and other underpinnings to the bobbin area so I let her know and she is looking for those.

    In the meantime, I cleaned and oiled it and found parts in my stash for it. I had it straight stitching just fine last night so will run the rest of the patterns and see how that goes.

    Since we never talked price and now I am likely adding in parts what would be fair to charge her? This is a first for me. I don't want to go too high and I wouldn't want to go too low in case she tells friends and they want help too.

    Does everyone eventually get asked to repair machines?
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  2. #2
    Super Member mlmack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    1,383
    Around here, the sewing machine shops get around $90 to refurbish a machine, parts not included. That usually includes cleaning, lubricating, and checking timing. Then again, they are professionals.

    What model of Necchi is it?
    Mark

  3. #3
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    I won't be calibrating each and every little part unless something appears to be off kilter. Getting it running smoothly and delivering a good stitch is primary. It's a Necchi 522.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  4. #4
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,838
    Yikes, it's never a good idea to take on a job without a verbal understanding of cost or price. You're kind of stuck in a pickle now..hope you can manage to at least get some $ for your time . At the least, it will be a lesson learned?

  5. #5
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Candace, I am definitely a card carrying member of the learn as you go school. Fortunately, I didn't have to put in tons of time and it appears the issues are already solved. I just ran all the patterns without a problem. Last night when I spoke with her and asked her to look for the missing parts she asked if maybe they could be bought on-line so I am under the impression she is open to paying for parts.

    As it worked out I had parts here that work in the machine. Most of the work was cleaning and oiling with minor adjustment. I'll keep it a few days just to be sure it is working correctly, but at least at this time I don't have a huge investment in time. If she is not open to paying me for MY parts, I could easily remove them.

    I really don't think that is going to be a problem though. I think she just wants to get her machine working again.
    Last edited by Mrs. SewNSew; 06-15-2014 at 10:34 AM.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  6. #6
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Duplicate!
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  7. #7
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. SewNSew View Post
    Candace, I am definitely a card carrying member of the learn as you go school.
    Me too!!!!

  8. #8
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8,097
    I set a charge rate like this.

    $35.00 for a machine that just needs cleaned and serviced with maybe a couple adjustments.
    ~Up to;
    $65.00 for one that needs major cleaning, servicing, and lots of work.
    ~Then;
    $Price Determined On Inspection for one that needs lots of repair and fixing in addition to cleaning and servicing.

    All parts are extra of course.

    I figure I'll make out decent for most of them, and will probably loose my shirt on some. Hopefully it will balance out in the end.

    Joe

  9. #9
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Thanks Joe! That's nice to hear some figures and how you determine them. Because this is the first machine I have agreed to see for repair, I had no idea what to say. Once the machine is ready to return I want to have an idea of what I want for the job.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Delavan
    Posts
    470
    $74.99 for a cleaning here in madison. this is what I paid for my fancy babylock to have it cleaned a couple of months ago. no repairs.
    I like joes answer and his pricing, sounds reasonable. call around to any local shops and see what the going rate is. you may want to undercut a little, due to your inexperience. parts... I would again call or go online and see what they would cost and this is what you would charge her.
    make a couple of bucks. then you can buy another machine. hehehe
    😊 wilburness 😊

  11. #11
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    I am excited for you with having your first (potentially) paying job with machines! Let us know how it ends?
    ​Sheri

  12. #12
    Super Member oldsewnsew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Springfield Oregon
    Posts
    1,481
    I like Joe's rates too. I think if I were to engage in that, it's about where I'd be at. From the viewpoint, that I'm not factory or otherwise trained, don't carry a lot of parts, and would not be comfortable working on some machines. Just getting started, I don't really care if I only made $20/hour. I know a shop charges more, but they also have higher overhead, more of everything I just mentioned. Like comparing apples to oranges.
    Jim

    "What do you mean worrying doesn't help? Everything I ever worried about...never happened!"
    quote by __________ I forget who.

  13. #13
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Quote Originally Posted by oldsewnsew View Post
    I like Joe's rates too. I think if I were to engage in that, it's about where I'd be at. From the viewpoint, that I'm not factory or otherwise trained, don't carry a lot of parts, and would not be comfortable working on some machines. Just getting started, I don't really care if I only made $20/hour. I know a shop charges more, but they also have higher overhead, more of everything I just mentioned. Like comparing apples to oranges.
    I agree with you. I am not the expert for sure! I do have a good sense with these things, some experience but not a lot and am willing to try -on some machines. I would never expect to be paid like an experienced tech, but I do want some compensation for my time. Yeah, any profit will most likely go right back into machines lol!

    I should call the shop in town and see what they charge because now I am getting curious. I've never gone there but have heard they ONLY do the old metal machines.
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  14. #14
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,912
    Last time I took mine in, it was $75.00 just for cleaning, oiling etc. If parts are needed, you pay extra, of course.

  15. #15
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8,097
    Here's some things I've found out about working on other folks machines.

    Bobbins:
    >Put in a supply of the most common bobbins. Class 66, 15, FW and any others you think you might need.
    Buy the best you can find. Lots of machine problems are caused by defective or damaged bobbins.
    >If the customers machine has a filled bobbin in it, either lay it aside and use one of yours, or peal the thread out of theirs and refill it. I have a Singer 328K waiting to be picked up that had 4 layers of thread in the bobbin. I emptied it and put in fresh thread to test it with.

    Needles:
    >Put in a supply of good needles. We all know that dull, bent, rusted, or the wrong type needles will cause many problems. The FW I'm testing right now didn't have a needle in it when it was dropped off.

    Misc Parts:
    >Rubber parts, machine feet, bobbin winding tires, need replaced from time to time too. Sew-Classic is quick on those, I had the machine finished just before the rubber parts were delivered.
    But if you can put in a set or two of each and a couple bobbin winding tires of the most common type you can save yourself time.

    Wiring:
    >For your customers don't rewire cord blocks, they are far easier to replace. Also be very careful when rewiring motors. If your not sure of what you are doing, put in a new motor if available.
    Why? Law suits. The one thing you can be sure of is that if you rewire a machine and anything electrical goes wrong with it, the customer is gonna hammer you in court. Buying and installing new parts will put the burden of guilt on the manufacturer when you show you installed it correctly.
    On the old machines that do not have available wiring or motors, well, go to a lawyer and have a disclaimer form drawn up that the customer has to sign to absolve you of liability should something go wrong. And maybe put in a huge liability insurance policy in addition to that.

    Sorry about the last part. I have no problems with rewiring my machines, but those I sell or fix for others, I avoid it.

    Joe

  16. #16
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Here's some things I've found out about working on other folks machines.

    Bobbins:
    >Put in a supply of the most common bobbins. Class 66, 15, FW and any others you think you might need.
    Buy the best you can find. Lots of machine problems are caused by defective or damaged bobbins.
    >If the customers machine has a filled bobbin in it, either lay it aside and use one of yours, or peal the thread out of theirs and refill it. I have a Singer 328K waiting to be picked up that had 4 layers of thread in the bobbin. I emptied it and put in fresh thread to test it with.

    Needles:
    >Put in a supply of good needles. We all know that dull, bent, rusted, or the wrong type needles will cause many problems. The FW I'm testing right now didn't have a needle in it when it was dropped off.

    Misc Parts:
    >Rubber parts, machine feet, bobbin winding tires, need replaced from time to time too. Sew-Classic is quick on those, I had the machine finished just before the rubber parts were delivered.
    But if you can put in a set or two of each and a couple bobbin winding tires of the most common type you can save yourself time.

    Wiring:
    >For your customers don't rewire cord blocks, they are far easier to replace. Also be very careful when rewiring motors. If your not sure of what you are doing, put in a new motor if available.
    Why? Law suits. The one thing you can be sure of is that if you rewire a machine and anything electrical goes wrong with it, the customer is gonna hammer you in court. Buying and installing new parts will put the burden of guilt on the manufacturer when you show you installed it correctly.
    On the old machines that do not have available wiring or motors, well, go to a lawyer and have a disclaimer form drawn up that the customer has to sign to absolve you of liability should something go wrong. And maybe put in a huge liability insurance policy in addition to that.

    Sorry about the last part. I have no problems with rewiring my machines, but those I sell or fix for others, I avoid it.

    Joe
    Good advice Joe. I have no problems re-wiring motors on my own machines either but you make an excellent point about others and how they sometimes deal with things. (cords too!)

    Funny about the needles and bobbins..I just placed an order with Sew Classic on Saturday for a supply. * I like to have them for myself as well as any machines I am working on. The hoard came in with lots of spare needles and bobbins but as I have sorted through things I find there is plenty of rust and damaged stuff that either needs to be thrown away or saved only as display. When it comes to actual usage, new ones are best!
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  17. #17
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Well, I returned the machine last night and got paid. It had been missing a few things and the owner was able to find most of them but it still needed a retaining ring for the shuttle. Once I cleaned and oiled and had parts for it the rest was just getting it dialed in. The owner paid me 50 for fixing it which can go into the SM money stash! Ha, who am I kidding? There is no sewing machine money stashed away, only sewing machines!
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

  18. #18
    Senior Member sdhaevrsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    343
    Woo-hoo, Christy! And you made me laugh with your last few sentences! :-D
    ​Sheri

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Southeastern Michigan
    Posts
    136
    Christy, you did a good thing and I am sure the owner appreciated it. That is worth something besides money.
    Gail, Queen of Procrastination

  20. #20
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wi
    Posts
    9,990
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltFaerie View Post
    Christy, you did a good thing and I am sure the owner appreciated it. That is worth something besides money.
    that is a win win
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  21. #21
    Super Member quiltedsunshine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,249
    My boss is honest to a fault. We only charge $49.95 for a service where I work. And that generally includes everything but parts. I generally service my neighbors' machines for free -- we're like family.
    Annette in Utah

  22. #22
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8,097
    The last two "paying" jobs I did, I got:

    $50.00 cash for the Singer 327, that covered parts and labor. That one didn't need much at all.
    $22.00 cash for parts and 4 machines (a Morse 15 clone, Brother 920D serger, Singer 237 and 347) in trade for my labor, for the FW I worked over. That one was abused by someone and needed lots of time to fix.

    $50.00 went to the bank, and $20.00 went to parts for the two Singers. The blue 347 will be flipped although it's turning out to be a nice machine. All metal inside. And the 237 is going into a treadle cabinet for an experiment. It too is all metal inside with plastic outside panels.

    So I figure I did make a profit even though I'm still cash challenged.

    Hmmm, I'm not sure I'm doing it right.


    Joe
    I love the old iron and wood machines. They're solid and reliable.
    Founder of IAAA - I Am An Anachronism .

  23. #23
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mendocino County CA
    Posts
    1,975
    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    The last two "paying" jobs I did, I got:

    $50.00 cash for the Singer 327, that covered parts and labor. That one didn't need much at all.
    $22.00 cash for parts and 4 machines (a Morse 15 clone, Brother 920D serger, Singer 237 and 347) in trade for my labor, for the FW I worked over. That one was abused by someone and needed lots of time to fix.

    $50.00 went to the bank, and $20.00 went to parts for the two Singers. The blue 347 will be flipped although it's turning out to be a nice machine. All metal inside. And the 237 is going into a treadle cabinet for an experiment. It too is all metal inside with plastic outside panels.

    So I figure I did make a profit even though I'm still cash challenged.

    Hmmm, I'm not sure I'm doing it right.


    Joe
    LOL! I think we are all doomed to be cash challenged! The 50.00 went to buy pizza for the family. Hubby said I should save it for sewing machine stuff, but I had to ask him, "do you think I don't spend "your" money on sewing machine stuff? Never will understand the "your money" "my money" thing. It's our money. *But they are MY sewing machines ahahahahaha!
    Christy
    Starting the year out fresh

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.