Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Please help me figure out model of this Dressmaker Deluxe ZigZag machine!

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9

    Please help me figure out model of this Dressmaker Deluxe ZigZag machine!

    I need to find a manual, but I can't identify the model number. Thanks for any help you all can provide!
    Attached Images Attached Images


  2. #2
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,838
    The model # may be underneath the machine.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9

    290a is the model

    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    The model # may be underneath the machine.
    Thanks! Candace, any idea where I could locate a manual for it?

    It's 290a

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    very small town in misssouri, Farber
    Posts
    20
    http://pages.sewing-machine-manuals....smakers+manual check o take a look here i think it has it

  5. #5
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    It does look like a Japanese clone. Is there a stamp or marking anywhere on the machine that says Japan? Love the two tone cream and green paint.
    Sweet Caroline

  6. #6
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,838
    Quote Originally Posted by techmommy View Post
    Thanks! Candace, any idea where I could locate a manual for it?

    It's 290a

    Do you really need a manual? It's a very cute machine but very easy to see what does what...

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Caroline, It says manufactured in Japan by Matsushita on one tag and then Made in Korea on the other. They are in the pic above, although hard to read.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Candace,
    I'm new to sewing. This was my grandmother's machine and I can't even figure out how to wind a bobbin! LOL

    I can't figure out how to disengage the motor from the sewing needle to turn the bobbin wheel.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Thanks, mbailey. Checking out your link now.

  10. #10
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    Thought so, a Japanese clone. I doubt you find a manual for it. The next step would be to determine what machine it was cloned from. I think that if you push down on the chrome lever for the bobbin winder it will disengage from the wheel. Can you take a closeup of the bobbin winder mechanism? That might help.
    Sweet Caroline

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by techmommy View Post
    Thanks, mbailey. Checking out your link now.
    Could not locate my machine, but I did contact the owner.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Well crikey, Caroline! Did these machines not come with a manual. I was surprised not to find one since everything else has been kept neat and some accessories are still in packaging. My grandmother was more of a shopper than a seamstress, so I doubt she used this machine very much at all. God rest her soul! Here are the close ups...one with the lever open and one closed.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    N. Florida
    Posts
    4,609
    Blog Entries
    45
    Is it a Dressmaker Centennial Series 2 machine. I wasn't sure if it matched the picture here: http://www.sewingmachinemanual.net/S...ion_manual.htm

    That is a link to a manual.

  14. #14
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    Quote Originally Posted by techmommy View Post
    Well crikey, Caroline! Did these machines not come with a manual. I was surprised not to find one since everything else has been kept neat and some accessories are still in packaging. My grandmother was more of a shopper than a seamstress, so I doubt she used this machine very much at all. God rest her soul! Here are the close ups...one with the lever open and one closed.
    I am thinking that when the bobbin is full the little lever will pop up and disengage the bobbin winder from the wheel. I don't have a machine like yours so I am just guessing. Have you figured out the threading yet? Meanwhile I will do some more sleuthing for you.
    Sweet Caroline

  15. #15
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    Posts
    3,972
    I am also thinking that your machine is a clone of a White sewing machine. That might help you to find a manual. I also remember reading somewhere that White copied Necchi sewing machines and they were manufactured in Japan.
    Sweet Caroline

  16. #16
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cadillac, MI
    Posts
    6,579
    Blog Entries
    19
    White didn't copy anyone. They were an excellent machine company on their own dating from the late 1800s. In the 1950s, they moved their manufacturing plants to Japan - a Koyo plant in particular. Then White went out of the manufacturing side and became distributors of Whites. The plants who had manufactured for them quickly put out a number of machines under different labels - my Universal for one, probably that Dressmaker and many more similar looking machines.

    With no sewing experience, I'd pay the $10 for the manual annthreecats found for you. Please do not sew on the machine without cleaning and oiling it. For me, I hope I can remember what I need from sewing on my mother's White in the 50s. If not, I'll be looking for a manual, too.

  17. #17
    Junior Member walkerjoanne44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Conroe Texas
    Posts
    149
    It looks a little bit like my moorse

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    I've been looking online again and I think the Centennial #2 is pretty close. I did find online instructions for that machine for winding the bobbin, but I can't get my machine to disengage as the instructions here say...
    http://www.sewusa.com/Threading_Diag...ng_diagram.htm

    I can't get that inner wheel to turn counter clockwise! So frustrated right now. I don't mind paying for the manual, at all. I just want to know it is going to be helpful!

    Thank you all for your helpful replies so far.

    As far as cleaning and oiling, I don't even know how to go about that until I find a manual.

    I have sewn a tiny bit on it thus far, but I will stop until I can figure out how to do those. I certainly don't want to tear it up.

  19. #19
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    So. Fla now, Va orig
    Posts
    1,568
    Dressmaker machines were made by Dressmaker, but they also made a number of private label machines for others. There are many big manufacaturers that make machines TO SPECIFICATION for others. Janome/Kenmore, Brother, New Home, Universal, etc. Just because a machine was made in Japan does not mean it is a clone, I come across a lot of vintage machines since I rescue and repair them. Most of them have similar technology (except the Necchi made in Italy was a true odd ball but wonderful machine.) Your machine may have a little quirk that just isn't releasing the auto pop up bobbin winder. The knob on the handwheel may not be back in a tight setting. Hopefully all the great advice you are getting will solve your problem.
    pat design

  20. #20
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    I like those old machines. They are easy to use and work horses. You don't have to dis-engage the clutch to wind a bobbin but you sure better make sure you take the thread out of the needle. They are easy to clean - much like the clones. I did a tutorial on a 15 clone http://www.quiltingboard.com/vintage...r-t169127.html - your machine has a stitch width selector and a stitch selector different - just be sure to not use a cutting oil on anything plastic - it may well be all metal anyway. Use heat if it is stuck. The bobbin should be very similar, too. If you get stuck get the free clone manual and you can see how to wind a bobbin, how to thread and how to care for the machine. If you turn the knobs make sure the needle is out of the hole. Take your time and you will really like that machine.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Good news! I'm winding bobbins like a champ! Local repair shop used some tools to break the inner wheel lose and replaced the rotted rubber wheel on the bobbin mechanism all for $2! I think the manual I listed before is my machine, or at least really really close. They will clean and oil the entire machine for $70. I know this machine probably isn't worth that, but I love how it looks and it was my Grandmother's, so I will probably be going back next week to have them do that. Will that help the stitch to be more consistent? It could be user error, but it seems like the stitches vary when I'm sewing a long line.

    You have all been so helpful!

    Thanks, Ann for getting me going in the right direction. The Centennial 2 search is what located the link I posted. You rock!!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.