Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 156

Thread: refinishing sewing machine cabinets

  1. #101
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    I bought a New Home treadle machine last week for $28. The cabinet was painted a light pea green. We are now stripping the paint off. I'm using Citristrip and it's working fine. However, I've run into a problem. After two coats of stripper I still have green. Am I stuck with this? This is my first refinishing project.
    Name:  IMG_1470.JPG
Views: 438
Size:  440.9 KB
    Last edited by Minerva1; 11-08-2012 at 01:56 PM. Reason: forgot to add pic

  2. #102
    Super Member cabbagepatchkid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    1,787
    Wow! It's kind of a pretty green, though. I'll be interested in finding out how to get rid of that color, too.

    How is the Citristrip working on the drawer decorations? I have the same cabinet and it isn't painted but the wood has become extremely dark over the years and I like a lighter colored wood.
    ~~Cathy~~

  3. #103
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,549
    Blog Entries
    1
    The problem is that the paint is in the grain of the oak. Try actetone to remove it. If this does not work use a ligiud stripper for this not Citristrip. Citristrip in not strong enough. You can get it at Lowes ot HD. Just read the label this is strong stuff but will remove the paint.

    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  4. #104
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    Hi Cathy, I haven't gotten to the drawers yet. I wanted to finish the top and we finally figured out this afternoon how to detach the drop-down portions - at least that's what I think they're called. LOL

  5. #105
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    457
    I'm with Glenn - try a better stripper. ZipStrip and the like left on for a few minutes and then agitated with the ends of a bristle brush should pull the remaining paint from the pores of the oak.

  6. #106
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    Thank you. I'll try the acetone in the morning after it warms up a little outside. Then if it doesn't work I'll head up to Ace Hardware or Home Depot for something stronger. I'll let you all know how it goes.

  7. #107
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    The acetone didn't work. I was able to find ZipStrip semi-paste (kind of like a sloppy gel) but it is working wonders. It's even cleaning up the finish the Citristrip left behind. The green is slowly coming off that board. But I'm happy so far.

  8. #108
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    457
    Great! Be sure of your ventilation, though - the fumes act like carbon monoxide (binding very tightly to hemoglobin) so lots of fresh air is important.

  9. #109
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    I'm working outside under a boat cover that's open on three sides with a slight breeze blowing. I put it on the wood and then come inside.

  10. #110
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    Name:  IMG_1472 1.jpg
Views: 401
Size:  1.18 MB

    Much better. I think I may be able to live with this. I'll do the flip side tomorrow.

  11. #111
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    7
    Wow! I'm really impressed that this looks so much different. You can hardly see the water marks from the photo!

  12. #112
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    The paint stripping continues, but is going very well. Had to buy more Zip Strip this morning.

    I'm leaning towards a walnut stain when I get that far. But was wondering about using tung oil instead of shellac or varnish. Any thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Patricia

  13. #113
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,549
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Minerva1 View Post
    The paint stripping continues, but is going very well. Had to buy more Zip Strip this morning.

    I'm leaning towards a walnut stain when I get that far. But was wondering about using tung oil instead of shellac or varnish. Any thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Patricia
    I would recommend shellac not tung oil. Shellac will give you more of the look of the original finish than tung oil which was never used on these old sewing machine cabinets.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  14. #114
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    457
    Tung oil really amounts to a type of varnish (cured rather than evaporated setting process) and has some of the same advantages and drawbacks. It will be better against water and might be tougher than shellac. OTOH, shellac is reparable - new shellac will meld with the existing finish very well - whereas with cured finishes repairs will be separate from the original finish (less any mechanical connection from roughening.) You also don't have to worry about the cloths you use for shellac catching fire on their own

  15. #115
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sparks, NV
    Posts
    1,226
    I bought a Willcox & Gibbs treadle machine a few weeks ago. A repair is needed. The machine gets attached to a board, and the board gets attached to the cabinet. The problem is that the board cannot be attached to the cabinet because the screw holes are not solid. Here are some pictures to show the board and what the hinges look like on the cabinet that this board should attach to with wood screws:

    Top of board (dark marks are an outline of the machine base)
    Name:  1-topOfBoard.JPG
Views: 441
Size:  129.6 KB

    bottom of board
    Name:  2-bottomOfBoard.JPG
Views: 409
Size:  126.7 KB
    hinges on the cabinet (these allow the board to drop down into the cabinet for storing the machine away under the cabinet top)
    Name:  3-hingeInMainCabinetThatTheBoardGetsAttachedTo.JPG
Views: 406
Size:  108.8 KB

    The problem is the the veneer has pulled away and the screws holes are at that exact point. Here is a picture of one of the sides of the board that I fixed by gluing and clamping. I am thinking that will be solid enough to be used now
    Name:  4-howIFixedSideOne.JPG
Views: 394
Size:  143.9 KB
    And, here is the side that I still need to repair. This side has missing veneer:
    Name:  5-showsTheDamageThatNeedsRepaired.JPG
Views: 379
Size:  139.0 KB
    Below, I've tried to explain the idea I have for fixing this.
    Name:  6-explanationOfSolutionIAmThinkingOf.JPG
Views: 369
Size:  156.4 KB
    I am wondering the best way to make this repair? I have no experience in woodworking or wood finishing but I've been around it my whole life.

    Thanks for any suggestions you can give me.

    Judy

  16. #116
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by cabbagepatchkid View Post
    Wow! It's kind of a pretty green, though. I'll be interested in finding out how to get rid of that color, too.

    How is the Citristrip working on the drawer decorations? I have the same cabinet and it isn't painted but the wood has become extremely dark over the years and I like a lighter colored wood.

    I ended up using the Zip Strip on the drawers. I put it on and waited about 20 mins. The majority of the paint wiped off. I put a second coat of the stripper on it and it got the rest off. I did have to gently use a small brass brush, a wooden orange stick, and a wooden skewer to really get the paint out of the crevices.

    I'm almost done with the staining. Only three pieces left to go.

    Patricia

  17. #117
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,549
    Blog Entries
    1
    Judy I would square off the bad veneer and glue new back of the same thickness. The I would dowel in the screw holes hardwood dowels glued of course. then redrill screw holes and attach the hinges and you should be fine. Sorry I did not get cack to you sooner.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  18. #118
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Behind my sewing machine
    Posts
    7,207
    Blog Entries
    4
    I am so thrilled that people are sharing how to restore these and keep them out of the trash!! I get so sad when I see people tear them a part and sell just the drawers in consignment shops.

  19. #119
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sparks, NV
    Posts
    1,226
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    Judy I would square off the bad veneer and glue new back of the same thickness. The I would dowel in the screw holes hardwood dowels glued of course. then redrill screw holes and attach the hinges and you should be fine. Sorry I did not get cack to you sooner.
    Skip
    Perfect! That is what I will do then. I'll post pictures once I am done. Thanks Glenn. I am anxious to use this machine in its cabinet.

  20. #120
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,549
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by JudyTheSewer View Post
    Perfect! That is what I will do then. I'll post pictures once I am done. Thanks Glenn. I am anxious to use this machine in its cabinet.
    I want to give you a tip on the inserting the dowel into the screw hole. Get a dowel a little larger than the screw hole and sharpen it in a pencil sharpener to taper the dowel to fit the hole and glue it in and cut off any excess dowel flush with the side. Be sure to let the glue cure for at least overnight or 24 hours.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  21. #121
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sparks, NV
    Posts
    1,226
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    I want to give you a tip on the inserting the dowel into the screw hole. Get a dowel a little larger than the screw hole and sharpen it in a pencil sharpener to taper the dowel to fit the hole and glue it in and cut off any excess dowel flush with the side. Be sure to let the glue cure for at least overnight or 24 hours.
    Skip
    I bought my supplies (wood glue, hard wood dowel, oak wood board to create the patch). And, here are the results!

    (I ended up not using the dowel even though that is probably the best way to do it. Since my wood patch was 100% oak I thought the repair might be strong enough "as is". If my repair does not last I will have to go back and redo it the "correct" way.)

    1) I cut the patch from the wood using the Dremel. Then I trimmed an area in the sewing machine board to match the patch. I coated both wood surfaces with wood glue and clamped.


    Name:  1 IMG_0319.JPG
Views: 450
Size:  215.8 KB


    Here are some pictures with the clamps removed.

    Name:  2 IMG_0322.JPG
Views: 456
Size:  216.9 KB

    Name:  3 IMG_0323.JPG
Views: 450
Size:  157.7 KB


    2) Attached my repaired board to the hardware on the machine's cabinet

    Name:  4 IMG_0326.JPG
Views: 469
Size:  225.3 KB

    3) Screwed the machine itself back onto the cabinet's board, attached the belt, and treadled away

    Name:  5 IMG_0327.JPG
Views: 463
Size:  174.5 KB


    What a nice stitch this machine makes. I plan on doing some red work using this machine. Here is a closeup of the stitches.

    Name:  6 IMG_0328.JPG
Views: 425
Size:  211.7 KB
    Up until now, I was only able to stitch by manually turning the wheel. This treadling is MUCH nicer!

    Thank you for all of your help Glenn! I really appreciate it.

    Judy

  22. #122
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,549
    Blog Entries
    1
    Judy I am glad you got the repaires done and the machine sews well but I would have rather you inserted the dowels for a stronger repair. It would have held the screws better. You did a good job on this one. I am glad I could help you.

    A sewing friend,
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  23. #123
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    505
    I have just been given a Singer 1917 127K which belonged to my husbands' grandmother. My query here is how I clean...only clean the veneer on the cabinet. I don't want to strip it and re-finish it as it is in good condition and I want to keep it looking "its' life". The veneer isn't cracking or peeling, just seems to have a lot of darkened grain. My question is...could this be how it always looked or is it grime? How do I clean it without stripping? Can I just use detergent and a soft brush...will this damage the veneer or its' finish? Thanking all in anticipation....

  24. #124
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    2,549
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by ruby2shoes View Post
    I have just been given a Singer 1917 127K which belonged to my husbands' grandmother. My query here is how I clean...only clean the veneer on the cabinet. I don't want to strip it and re-finish it as it is in good condition and I want to keep it looking "its' life". The veneer isn't cracking or peeling, just seems to have a lot of darkened grain. My question is...could this be how it always looked or is it grime? How do I clean it without stripping? Can I just use detergent and a soft brush...will this damage the veneer or its' finish? Thanking all in anticipation....
    Ruby2shoes don't use any water on the cabinet it will cause the veneer to come loose. Go to my tut on cleaning and reviving cabinet finishes and there you will see to solutions 1 and 2 Use solution one to clean the cabinet. athen use solution 2 to revive the finish and the wax with a good paste wax I recomend briwax.
    Skip
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  25. #125
    Senior Member ruby2shoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    505
    thanks very much Glenn; I found your tutorial...how did I miss it? sigh...

Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4 5 6 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.