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Thread: Singer Model 66

  1. #1
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    Singer Model 66

    https://seattle.craigslist.org/tac/f...803878862.html

    I found this forsale. According to the serial #, it's a 1929 Model66. From the pictures it looks to be in good condition. Myknowledge of the 66 is limited, but I thought the early 66s had the rearscrews on the pressure foot. Thepictures show a side screw.

    So my first question is, am I misinformed, or was this possiblya modification?
    Second question, what would you consider a reasonable offer forthis machine and table (assuming everything is in working condition, and inaverage cosmetic condition considering its age)?
    Final question, when I go see the machine, is there anythingparticular that I should look out for?


    Thank you for your insights

  2. #2
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    Model 66 has a drop in bobbin case and it's very easy to use and operate it. Only the very early 66 had back clamp fitting for the presser feet. It was introduced in 1900 and the back clamp version just a couple of years into production before they switched to side clamp. As late as 1929 you can be pretty sure the side clamp presser bar is all original. I think it was considered their top model until the 201 was introduced abit into the 1930s. It's a sturdy, dependable machine, when oiled and clean it runs and sitches very smoothly. It runs lighter than a 201 for some reason. The machine and cabinet in the add is what I call very nice condition. All the gold decals are there, a few signs of wear, but it looks clean and generally intact. The wood has a few stains on the top and I assume it can easily be improved up on with the right polish. If you work a bit on it you can get the finish nearly flawless.

    I payed $80 dollar for my 201 in the simplest cabinet, not nearly as nice as the 66 in question. The machine needed quite a bit of cleaning and a few replacement parts to run again. Treadles go for anything from give away and up to about $180 in my area. Much more than that and it has to be something special. If you can thread up the machine and make a stitch sample that is enough to take a chance on this machine. ame sure the bobbin case is there, any thing on a 66 can be sorted out with out spending much money and this 66, at least when it's in reasonable condition. In this case everything looks very good. You can probably get the threadle part running again. It looks like some parts are missing, probably removed when converted to electric. I have to admit I like motor and light, I'm only used to electrical machines. A cast iron straight stitcher is my favorite machine to work on.
    Last edited by Mickey2; 01-29-2019 at 11:13 AM.

  3. #3
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    I would also ask if they have/are including the treadle pedal, which was removed. Reasonable is subjective. Depending on sewing condition, market, length of time listed, here, $50-80.
    At $75 and up similar models and condition tend to be relisted again and again.

  4. #4
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    Side clamp would have the red eye decals. My 66 was converted from a back clamp to a side clamp. I have the original back clamp and feet as well as side clamp feet.
    Singer 66 treadle, Singer 15-91, JC Penney 6923, Kenmore 50, White 2334, Brother 920D serger. RIP Singer 1036

  5. #5
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    I have noticed treadle irons turn up now and then, it's not impossible to identify cabinet number and the parts needed. It probably requires a bit of time and search, but the parts are out there some where.

  6. #6
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    The listing is gone, and I missed seeing it. Did you get it? Care to post pictures?
    ďYou canít use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.Ē ~Maya Angelou.
    One's mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions. ~Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose_P View Post
    The listing is gone, and I missed seeing it. Did you get it? Care to post pictures?
    I did get it, and no I donít have pictures yet.
    I need to give it a thorough cleaning, lots of lint &fuzz in the bobbin area and I assume in the feed dogs too, and it definitelyneeds to be oiled.The wood on the cabinet is in pretty goodshape, again a little cleaning and furniture polish will spruce it upnicely.The decals are in amazing conditionconsidering the age of the machine (almost 100 years old).Most of the decal wear is actually the Singername across the top of the machine (probably from lifting it out of the cabinetand back in).

    The missing iron work parts (foot petal, fly wheel andguard, and the bar that connects the petal & wheel) are the down side. But since this machine is electric, that isonly cosmetic, and doesnít affect the functioning of the machine, just the $value.So Iím not displeased, especiallysince it did help with the price negotiations!
    I did do a little research, and if I wanted to replace the missingiron work, I found complete sets for $100 and under, and individual parts forquite a bit less. Not something Iíll doanytime soon though, but itís nice to know I have that option.
    Thank you all for your insights and advice. It served me well.

  8. #8
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
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    hooray for you. don't forget to de-fuzz under the bed also, and oil everything that moves, or should Stitch length selectors often need oil. Patience can get you some irons, likely under $50 for a set.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

  9. #9
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    There is a couple of things it took me a while before I became aware of on the 66. There is a roller like cam part under the feed dogs. The round roller bit inside is suppose to turn and it makes a difference when it comes to noise and wear of the machine, it's worth making sure it's freed up and turns again. Another thing that can be a bit tricky is the bracket that holds the bobbin case in place. The bobbin case comes out by sliding the bobbin cover completely off and the bobbin case comes out by lifting the lever up and towards you. So far very easy, the bobbin case comes out with a bit of wiggeling of the hand wheel.

    The tricky bit is if you loosen the screw in center there just in front of the bobbin case. When you loosen it, the whole hook and race under the bobibn case will start floating about and it has to be adjusted very accurately when put back together. Too tight it will affect the bobbin thread tension; too loose and the bobbin case will make a lot of noise. A 66 is a smooth running, low noise machine, I promise. If not something needs to be sorted out.
    Last edited by Mickey2; 01-31-2019 at 04:45 PM.

  10. #10
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    66-16 Red Eye

    Just joined quilting board. Purchased a model 66-16 just yesterday. Fair Condition. My hubby says it will be a fun project! He has started tearing it down. He is watching lots of YouTube videos about the workings of it, I also am doing same. Cabinet needs some cleaning up, it is a 6 drawer cabinet. Always wanted a Singer treadle machine. Love it! Looks like an informative board to be part of.

  11. #11
    Super Member leonf's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard Gloria. They will last forever. Have a great time with it.
    "Sacrifices must be made." Otto Lilienthal

  12. #12
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    Keep water away from the decals when cleaning; it will "silver" (ruin) them. (Ask me how I know.) The safest way to clean painted and decaled surfaces is with machine oil.

    The 66, and its little brother, the 3/4-sized 99, were massively popular machines and for a good reason. Keep them oiled and they'll go on forever.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manalto View Post
    Keep water away from the decals when cleaning; it will "silver" (ruin) them. (Ask me how I know.) The safest way to clean painted and decaled surfaces is with machine oil.

    The 66, and its little brother, the 3/4-sized 99, were massively popular machines and for a good reason. Keep them oiled and they'll go on forever.
    Thank you for the advice, I passed it on to my hubby.

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