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Thread: small, tabletop handcrank?

  1. #1
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    small, tabletop handcrank?

    Other than a featherweight being converted to handcrank, I would love to see some smaller, portable, tabletop pictures of handcranks. . . . . .

    Oh, another curiosity -- Are many of the older handcranks listed as "children's" really childrens or is it assumed a child's machine because of its tiny size? How to differentiate?

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    My experience, many older machines are listed as "childern's" when being sold because they seller has no clue what they have.

    This is my smallest handcrank.



    To give you an idea of size, this is that model (different machine) next to a Singer 28

    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  3. #3
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    I love mine although I had to revamp it a bit to make it hand crankable.
    aluminum, weighs about 16pounds.

    I had a singer127 but it weighed about 35 pounds. Sent it off with a lady who bought my Janome 6600. that is its case in the background.

    Don't do it on a featherweight, you only get 3 stitches per turn...like watching grass grow

    there is a thread here somewhere with more info on the Bantam. It is 3/4 size by the way.

    A lot of vintage machines can be converted to hand crank or treadle.
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    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    I'm not sure you even get 3 stitches per turn on a featherweight converted to hand crank. When I convert mine it seems like I only get one stitch per turn. The crank is directly attached, no gearing. What makes it acceptable is that I can sit outside with it in my lap and sew without needing a table to set it on.

    I'd love to find a small handcrank machine that gives a reasonable number of stitches per crank.

    Rob
    1955 Singer Featherweight 221/ Late 60's early 70's White Selectronic 970/
    1975 Kenmore 158.1914/ 1981 Brother VX560/ Brother PC420PRW/
    Brother PQ1500s

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    Portable is the debatable aspect. The older portables can be moved around but are heavy. I don't think there are any hand crank models close to the Featherweight when it comes to weight. I guess a hand crank Singer 99 and 128 are good examples of basic smaller portable models.

    They aren't common at all, but I have seen the later aluminium (beige/brown) Singer 201K23 with spoked hand wheel, and I guess they will easily convert to hand crank. Because of the aluminium cast body their weigh less than the 3/4 sized cast iron models, and actually can be carried in one hand. (I just looked it up and the model is 201K29).

    I'm trying to think of something that's a bit lighter than a standard 3/4 size hand crank. There have been a few threads on uncommon cast aluminium 99s, (I think one was in a crinkle finish?). I'm not sure anymore, perhaps others remember something about this? These should convert to a more light weight machine. A 99 is actually rather nice to work on. I use my straight stitchers, but they are all electrical.

    Most of the children's sewing machines on the web seem to be called "toy", and they are childrens machines. Most 99s, 28s and similar on the web are not described as childrens machines luckily at least as far as I have noticed. It would be doing those who are new to vintage machines disservice. Children's machines are often called "toys", most of them are chain stitchers, but the odd lock stitch toy turns up. These really aren't for regular sewing, the presser foot and needle access are shaped to be safe for small hands, making it a bit cumbersome for regular sewing.
    Last edited by Mickey2; 06-18-2017 at 03:03 AM.

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    If it works for you, a chain stitch machine (like Singer 24, Wilcox& Gibbs and it's copies) is very portable.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

  7. #7
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Since I use the featherweight to stitch my "crumbs" into larger fabric to be used in quilts, I think the chain stitch machines would be a no go. Unless I'm misremembering what a chain stitch is.

    Rob
    1955 Singer Featherweight 221/ Late 60's early 70's White Selectronic 970/
    1975 Kenmore 158.1914/ 1981 Brother VX560/ Brother PC420PRW/
    Brother PQ1500s

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    German Kohler? Transverse shuttle with ceramic handcrank https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...653-574918.jpg

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    128 in foreground 99 behindName:  apple fest 99 128  mm  b.jpg
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Size:  453.5 KB

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    That Koehler is adorable! I may regret seeing that photo... ;-)

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    Sewmor also made a 3/4 size aluminum machine. It might be convertible.

    bkay

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    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    Joe's sharing his Sewmore convert to handcrank is what started my search. The full name of mine is Belaire Bantam, there is a full size with just the Belaire name. The joy of the two is they are light weight.

    I take mine when we go fishing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kch1983 View Post
    That Koehler is adorable! I may regret seeing that photo... ;-)
    It is adorable! I may regret seeing it, too!
    Patrice S

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    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Those are all gorgeous. I'm just the teensiest bit jealous...
    1955 Singer Featherweight 221/ Late 60's early 70's White Selectronic 970/
    1975 Kenmore 158.1914/ 1981 Brother VX560/ Brother PC420PRW/
    Brother PQ1500s

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    yobrosew, I re-read your post. Sometimes a picture ( especially a fuzzy for sale add) of a machine isn't enough to show you the difference between a toy and a very small serious machine. But the weight is a huge factor. Ask if it is cast iron or pressed tin?

    Found the Kohler on CL. family had had it for 20 years and never used it.

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    Name:  mystery machine  front b.jpg
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Size:  394.1 KBForgot this one.

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    https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...653-573602.jpg


    This Wilcox and Gibbs is small enough to be mistaken for a toy. It will likely end up with a custom hand crank and base on it.

  19. #19
    mim
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    hand crank

    I will have to find a pix I took while I was in St Petersburg Russia. I was staying with a lady for 2 weeks. I didn't know her, she was just earning extra money.

    One night she was sewing curtains on a hand crank sewing machine. She also had a new electric machine, but preferred the hand crank. It had been her mothers -- way back it was originally a treadle -- they treasured it all these years -- even during WW2 when The city was surrounded by the Nazi army for 3 years and there was no food or heat. After WW2 it was electrified and then in 1975 she had someone weld a hand crank to it.

    She liked it because she said it sewed each stitch straight not at an angle like all modern machines.

    It is called the Red Revolution sewing machine

    Mim
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    Last edited by mim; 06-20-2017 at 06:12 PM. Reason: add pix

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    I have both a Singer 28 and 128 HC. Either is certainly portable. I took the 28 on a hunting trip to repair a shirt I did not have time to mend before I left, and it did a great job.

  21. #21
    Junior Member SusanErler's Avatar
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    I have a 1908 Singer 66 that I put a hand-crank on. I bring it outside on the patio. Portable it is, but it's HEAVY. Love it though -- I make a lot of things with it.
    Name:  Sewing-outside.jpg
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  22. #22
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    Mim, thank you for sharing your story
    Susan, I'm headed to the covered deck with mine this afternoon. The only problem with sewing outdoors is if it is windy, have to keep weights on everything, which to me is more trouble than it's worth.

    Sewing on picnic tables when we go fishing is wonderful, but I alsy have a little folding table that just fits in front of my seat, if conditions outside aren't good, conditions inside are just fine And the vew is always delicious

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    Wow, this is a cool machine. Thanks for the pics. I want to get a handcrank for the grandkids when they are over (oldest 5). They all, boys and girls are intrigued with my treadle but it is really too much for them.

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    This machine looks so friendly! And inviting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mim View Post
    I will have to find a pix I took while I was in St Petersburg Russia. I was staying with a lady for 2 weeks. I didn't know her, she was just earning extra money.

    One night she was sewing curtains on a hand crank sewing machine. She also had a new electric machine, but preferred the hand crank. It had been her mothers -- way back it was originally a treadle -- they treasured it all these years -- even during WW2 when The city was surrounded by the Nazi army for 3 years and there was no food or heat. After WW2 it was electrified and then in 1975 she had someone weld a hand crank to it.

    She liked it because she said it sewed each stitch straight not at an angle like all modern machines.

    It is called the Red Revolution sewing machine

    Mim
    So much love and memory in one machine to pass from family member to family member. I do not come from a long line of sewers. I do not think any of my grands or greats even had sewing machines. I got my first sewing machine from my step-father who in his mid-forties decided he wanted to learn.

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